Pretentious Snobby Bastard Fly Fishing!!!!

General: Fly Fishing BS => The bar is open.... => Topic started by: Woolly Bugger on September 13, 2020, 08:28:51 AM

Title: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 13, 2020, 08:28:51 AM
Alligator grows at alarming rate; officials think they know why

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>>>The hunters caught the 12-foot, 1-inch alligator in Forest Home Chute off the Mississippi River south of Eagle Lake last week and turned in the tag, as reported this week by the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks.

When first tagged, the alligator measured 6.4 feet, meaning it grew an average of 8.6 inches each year over nine years.

"It is rare to document alligators of this size class with annual growth rates of this magnitude," the MWDFP stated on Facebook

https://ftw.usatoday.com/2020/09/alligator-grows-at-alarming-rate-officials-think-they-know-why


So what is the explanation given by experts? Asian carp.

"Since the time 2003-2005, this area of the Mississippi Delta has seen a tremendous increase in the Asian carp population," the MWDFP stated. "The MWDFP Wildlife Bureau has documented alligators feeding on the Asian carp on many occasions.


Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Phil on September 13, 2020, 18:38:24 PM
Interesting. Thanks for posting, Bossman.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 15, 2020, 08:26:27 AM
Happy 85th Birthday, Blue Ridge Parkway!


>>>September 11 marks the 85th birthday of the Blue Ridge Parkway! On that day in 1935, construction began at Cumberland Knob, on the border between Virginia and North Carolina, which became the first recreation area in the new national park unit. The monumental task of building the Parkway started as a New Deal-era project under President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Travelers were finally able to drive the entire route in 1987 with the opening of the final section, the Linn Cove Viaduct. That's right, for 52 years of its history, the Parkway was under construction!

We are grateful for those who worked to complete all 469 miles of the scenic route and those members of the National Park Service who protect it today.

We'd like to thank you for playing an important role in the story of this amazing national park unit. For more than 20 years, donors have made so much possible—renovations of historic landmarks, wildlife studies, overlook clearing, trail repairs, and so much more. Your commitment to the Parkway makes it a better place today, tomorrow, and for the decades to come!


https://www.brpfoundation.org/blog/happy-85th-birthday-blue-ridge-parkway?fbclid=IwAR3I5ZkBmLicIldvyK-bQ6WTUfH7rgBGQZV3iVhaLtJCcwlLzHrE4f3gEKM
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Dougfish on September 15, 2020, 13:49:45 PM
23.5 miles have been closed near Roanoke since April 2. Slope failures due to heavy rain.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on September 16, 2020, 07:23:57 AM
Breaking 175-year tradition.

>>>In an urgent and impassioned editorial first published online Tuesday, the editorial board endorsed former vice president Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee, calling him the candidate "who is offering fact-based plans to protect our health, our economy and the environment."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/elections-2020/scientific-american-backs-biden-for-its-first-presidential-endorsement-in-175-years/ar-BB194NvS?ocid=msedgntp
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: troutrus on September 16, 2020, 08:48:42 AM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on September 16, 2020, 07:23:57 AMBreaking 175-year tradition.

>>>In an urgent and impassioned editorial first published online Tuesday, the editorial board endorsed former vice president Joe Biden, the Democratic nominee, calling him the candidate "who is offering fact-based plans to protect our health, our economy and the environment."

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/elections-2020/scientific-american-backs-biden-for-its-first-presidential-endorsement-in-175-years/ar-BB194NvS?ocid=msedgntp

Not much risk of  losing many subscribers, as it's doubtful many in the trump base read a science publication.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on September 16, 2020, 08:58:37 AM
Here's the editorial.  Interesting.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/scientific-american-endorses-joe-biden/

>>>The evidence and the science show that Donald Trump has badly damaged the U.S. and its people—because he rejects evidence and science. The most devastating example is his dishonest and inept response to the COVID-19 pandemic, which cost more than 190,000 Americans their lives by the middle of September. He has also attacked environmental protections, medical care, and the researchers and public science agencies that help this country prepare for its greatest challenges. That is why we urge you to vote for Joe Biden, who is offering fact-based plans to protect our health, our economy and the environment. These and other proposals he has put forth can set the country back on course for a safer, more prosperous and more equitable future.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 21, 2020, 09:56:05 AM
2 Men Working to Map World War II Bombs Are Killed by One

>>>Unexploded world war-era munitions are still a problem in many parts of Europe — dozens of devices, including grenades, are removed each year from backyards, fields and construction sites in Britain, France and Germany. But while the discoveries, which happen with surprising regularity, often prompt evacuations, damage is uncommon.

But in the Solomon Islands, a country where more than 75 percent of the population works as agricultural laborers, the buried munitions can make farming a fatal occupation. "They are scared of their land," Mr. Rodsted said.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/2-men-working-to-map-world-war-ii-bombs-are-killed-by-one/ar-BB19glz1?ocid=msedgntp


Crazy world... I read Aftermath: The Remnants of War: From Landmines to Chemical Warfare--The Devastating Effects of Modern Combat a few years back and it's fascinating and disturbing that there is so much UXO all over the world...

Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Yallerhammer on September 23, 2020, 17:05:25 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on September 21, 2020, 09:56:05 AM2 Men Working to Map World War II Bombs Are Killed by One

>>>Unexploded world war-era munitions are still a problem in many parts of Europe — dozens of devices, including grenades, are removed each year from backyards, fields and construction sites in Britain, France and Germany. But while the discoveries, which happen with surprising regularity, often prompt evacuations, damage is uncommon.

But in the Solomon Islands, a country where more than 75 percent of the population works as agricultural laborers, the buried munitions can make farming a fatal occupation. "They are scared of their land," Mr. Rodsted said.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/2-men-working-to-map-world-war-ii-bombs-are-killed-by-one/ar-BB19glz1?ocid=msedgntp


Crazy world... I read Aftermath: The Remnants of War: From Landmines to Chemical Warfare--The Devastating Effects of Modern Combat a few years back and it's fascinating and disturbing that there is so much UXO all over the world...



That is screwed up. Our tendency to kill each other never ceases to amaze me.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 24, 2020, 10:50:13 AM
Why are there unexploded bombs in the Pacific islands?

The death of two bomb-disposal experts in the Solomon Islands has put the spotlight on a decades-old problem in the Pacific. Why are the islands dotted with bombs? And why is the danger increasing?

>>>When Australians think about our Pacific Island neighbours, we picture pristine beaches, verdant jungles and delicious fresh seafood.

At least, that's the cliche.

But in a year in which a global pandemic has killed nearly a million people, the deaths of two people – Newcastle man Trent Lee, 40, and British national Luke Atkinson, 57 –in a bomb blast captured headlines and left many shocked. Lee and Atkinson were working for Norwegian People's Aid, an organisation that operates in 19 countries to remove undetonated wartime explosives.

How on Earth was a piece of unexploded ordnance (known as UXO) from World War II discovered in suburban Honiara, the capital of the Solomon Islands – 75 years after the war ended? Was this unusual? And what is being done about this lethal legacy?

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An explosive ordnance disposal technician clears one of the 600 caves that contain grenades and other explosives on the island of Peleliu in the Republic of Palau.CREDIT:JOHN RODSTED

https://www.smh.com.au/world/oceania/why-are-there-unexploded-bombs-in-the-pacific-islands-20200922-p55xzl.html
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 25, 2020, 09:01:34 AM
Arrest made after park ranger assaulted at Hanging Rock State Park

https://myfox8.com/news/arrest-made-after-park-ranger-assaulted-at-hanging-rock-state-park/?anvplayer-autoplay=0
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 25, 2020, 11:33:25 AM
https://youtu.be/IWtme-aGgf0

this org came up in my interwebnews


https://halousa.quorum.us/

sent a letter to the politicians in D.C.

Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 25, 2020, 11:51:45 AM
https://youtu.be/jw_oFPBiHIs
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 29, 2020, 09:07:13 AM
https://wr.al/1J1gr

You cannot see attachments on this board.

 <-;:  :cheers  :wave

Driver having a party?
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 29, 2020, 09:32:38 AM
https://www.porkbusiness.com/article/feral-swine-aerial-eradication-begins-havasu-refuge

>>> Portions of the 37,515-acre Havasu National Wildlife Refuge (HNWR) located on the lower Colorado River in Arizona and California will be temporarily closed to allow for the aerial eradication of feral swine. This marks the seventh aerial operation to eradicate feral swine from the refuge.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: driver on September 29, 2020, 20:44:54 PM
been spending to much time on porkbusiness.com again? I guess its better that PorkHub.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 01, 2020, 14:41:00 PM

TOM EARNHARDT: Following the quiet voices and science

>>>This week I repeated a ritual that has been part of my life for almost six decades. With friends, I stood on the rim of Linville Gorge in Burke County and looked down 1,500 feet to the Linville River below and back at least 300 million years in geological and biological time. Around us there were sheer cliffs covered with lichen, moss and mountain laurel. Below us were unseen black bear, ruffed grouse and bobcat hidden by the canopy of one of the last remaining old-growth forests in eastern America. When loggers came to the Appalachians in the 19th and early 20th centuries, they found the Gorge too rugged and too steep to build roads and extract timber.

https://www.wral.com/coronavirus/tom-earnhardt-following-the-quiet-voices-and-science/19307286/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 01, 2020, 14:53:32 PM
4,500-acre Priday Ranch north of Madras sold to Deschutes Land Trust



>>>BEND, Ore. (KTVZ) — The Deschutes Land Trust announced Wednesday the acquisition of Priday Ranch, its newest conservation project, on 4,500 acres north of Madras.

NewsChannel 21 spoke with Brad Nye, the conservation director of the Deschutes Land Trust, who said the property comes with significant cultural value.

https://ktvz.com/news/jefferson-county/2020/09/30/deschutes-land-trust-acquires-4500-acre-priday-ranch-north-of-madras/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 17, 2020, 09:12:28 AM
The invading Americans found that the Japanese had withdrawn already, so there was no fight, but it left Lahr with an indelible memory.

"The boats landed somewhere in Alaska, in one of the coves," he recalls with a laugh. "We were on regular army rations so there was a pretty good size creek coming off the island and there were these salmon in there. We had some of our grenades. We dropped them in there, they come floating up and we skinned them out and had salmon dinner."

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Howard Lahr
Five generations gather for a photo in July of 2015. They are (back row from left), Marvin Lahr, Howard Lahr, Julie Toral, (front) Erika Abrams, and, smallest of all, Alayla Abrams.

Submitted photo

Problem is, such living off the land was against regulations.

"Most of the guys had salmon for dinner and one of the officers found out we were having salmon," he said, shaking his head. "I just about got (demoted)."

Lahr never saw direct combat, but his regiment took part in some of the most challenging campaigns of World War II, including the icy effort to evict the Japanese from the Aleutian Islands, the only part of North America occupied by Japan. The unit went on to take part in the textbook-defining amphibious invasion of Kwajalien Atoll in the Marshall Islands, the Battle of Leyte, and finally the fighting on the Japanese island of Okinawa.


https://napavalleyregister.com/news/local/on-the-cusp-of-100-a-napa-world-war-ii-vet-recalls-his-service/article_ac8b8cfa-1a80-5085-b562-182beb62e40e.html


Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 18, 2020, 09:04:08 AM
Scientists will take the next 2 years to study life in Henry County more than 10,000 years ago

>>>The Virginia Museum of Natural History soon will embark on a 2-year archaeological endeavor to reveal the details of the beginning of civilization, covering more than 10,000 years, in Martinsville and Henry County.

The area is rich in history already, thanks largely to archaeological excavations conducted more than 50 years ago under the direction of Richard P. Gravely Jr. of Martinsville, whose work was donated to the Research Laboratories of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Modern methods and new technology allows today's archaeologists to expose new details in ways that never have been possible.

https://martinsvillebulletin.com/news/local/scientists-will-take-the-next-2-years-to-study-life-in-henry-county-more-than/article_1ccabf0c-2851-11eb-baae-433d1c3bedae.html


Bassett said their incentive for moving was to hunt for big game when the mastodon, giant ground sloths, 400-pound beavers*, wolves and mountain lions roamed the hills and valleys of Henry County.


*that's a whole lotta beaver!
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 26, 2020, 10:13:57 AM
Coast Guard saves 3 stranded on island of NC coast after boat drifts off
https://myfox8.com/news/coast-guard-saves-3-stranded-on-island-of-nc-coast-after-boat-drifts-off

>>Three people were stranded on a near-deserted island off the coast of North Carolina on Tuesday when their boat drifted off, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

All three were hunting on Raccoon Island at the time, the Coast Guard said in a news release Wednesday.

Raccoon Island is in a secluded area of the Pamlico Sound near the Outer Banks. The National Audubon Society describes it as a "high marsh island" that is "remote and not easily accessible."

https://www.newsobserver.com/news/state/north-carolina/article247431720.html

SeaTow to the rescues: boat recovered...
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Phil on November 26, 2020, 10:39:36 AM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on November 26, 2020, 10:13:57 AMCoast Guard saves 3 stranded on island of NC coast after boat drifts off
https://myfox8.com/news/coast-guard-saves-3-stranded-on-island-of-nc-coast-after-boat-drifts-off

>>Three people were stranded on a near-deserted island off the coast of North Carolina on Tuesday when their boat drifted off, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

All three were hunting on Raccoon Island at the time, the Coast Guard said in a news release Wednesday.

Raccoon Island is in a secluded area of the Pamlico Sound near the Outer Banks. The National Audubon Society describes it as a "high marsh island" that is "remote and not easily accessible."

https://www.newsobserver.com/news/state/north-carolina/article247431720.html

SeaTow to the rescues: boat recovered...

OOOPS!! The dang boat's gone!
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 26, 2020, 10:49:48 AM
I knew about the 1940s flood at Mortimer. But until yesterday wasn't aware of the Great NC Flood of 1916 which ravaged mountains of NC when two back to back hurricanes hit the region.

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Debris collected near the Asheville concrete bridge at the height of the Great Flood of 1916. Credit: NOAA Photo Library

>>>The flood destroyed hundreds of homes in the area and engulfed industrial plants, warehouses, and businesses along the French Broad. It damaged or washed away railroad tracks and demolished all three bridges across the river in Asheville. Riverside Park, a popular amusement park and gathering place on the French Broad, also perished under the floodwaters.

Upstream from Asheville, the waters breached or destroyed all the dams that supplied hydropower to the city. At the entrance to the Biltmore Estate, water reportedly reached 9 feet deep during the flood. Overall, the damage totaled an estimated $21 million—the equivalent of $500 million in today's dollars.

https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/news/investigating-the-great-flood-of-1916#:~:text=This%20year%20marks%20the%20centennial%20of%20the%20worst,banks%20after%20heavy%20rain%20fell%20over%20the%20area.

This is the flood that took out the Famon Caudill cabin on Basin Creek and killed his pregnant wife, Alice (1901-1916) of 6 months while he was away working for the railroad in Green Cove VA.

Read more at Our State Magazine (https://www.ourstate.com/flood-of-1916/)
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Onslow on November 26, 2020, 11:51:50 AM
We all should be keep the flood risk thoughts in our minds. The Yadkin @ Elkin floods buildings at 30,000 cfs.  In 1940, the river reached 160,000 cfs in Wilkesboro where the watershed is about 500 sq. miles.  It is over 800 in Elkin.

I cannot imagine the destruction would be caused if this river rose to 150-200K cfs in Elkin. It reached 28k about a month ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2NK-XYAuvY

Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on November 27, 2020, 12:18:45 PM
I always questioned why shaking hands with the wife's relatives felt weird.  Now I know.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/neanderthals-may-have-used-their-hands-differently-from-humans/ar-BB1bpol3?ocid=msedgntp
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 28, 2020, 01:00:15 AM
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BERLIN — The Danish Mayfly was selected Friday by an international group of entomologists and others as the Insect of the Year for 2021, but it won't have long to celebrate its 15 minutes of fame.
https://wr.al/1JPsm
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 03, 2020, 10:32:07 AM
Tongass National Forest is 'America's Last Climate Sanctuary'
Opening up the Tongass National Forest to additional logging and development could have serious implications for both the environment and the Alaska Native communities that depend on it.Guests are not allowed to view images in posts, please Register or Login


>>>When you walk into the temperate rainforest of the Tongass, a peaceful stillness greets you. The dense canopy of this misty Alaskan wilderness is made up of towering western hemlock, red and yellow cedar, and Sitka spruce trees, some of which are between 300 and 1,000 years old. Lichens adorn the trees with a mosaic of colors and textures, moss and ferns carpet the forest floor in lush green hues, and crystal-clear streams carve their way toward the Pacific Ocean.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/tongass-national-forest-americas-last-climate-sanctuary/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 04, 2020, 10:06:03 AM
Olympic Peninsula fishing guide groups alarmed by steelhead proposals

>>>FISHING GUIDES UP and down the Olympic Peninsula have come together to alternately express concern over what they see as overreaching restrictions on in-progress steelheading seasons on coastal rivers offered by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife and provide liveable options for this season.

Opposed to potential changes that could outlaw fishing from a floating device or even potentially close down winter steelhead fishing in the near future, members of the Northwest Olympic Peninsula Sportfishing Coalition, the Olympic Peninsula Guides Association, the Grays Harbor Sport Fishing Coalition and the Grays Harbor Guide Association have reached out to Fish and Wildlife and state lawmakers, hoping to have their voices heard.

>>>Kratzer estimated he would lose 85 percent of his guiding business if a floating device prohibition was implemented.

"A lot of my clientele has been fishing with me for decades and are in their 60s and 70s," Kratzer said. "They aren't disabled, but they are up in years, and they don't have the stability to wade rivers or fight currents." 


https://www.peninsuladailynews.com/sports/outdoors-peninsula-fishing-guide-groups-alarmed-by-steelhead-proposals/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 04, 2020, 12:40:41 PM
up your game!

16 Of The Very Greatest, Sweariest Scottish Insults Of All Time
Even Shakespeare couldn't have come up with "lavvy-heided wankstain

1)

"Awa' you and chew mah banger."

"Piss off and eat my dick."


https://youtu.be/NEDduUAKWSc

2)

"Shut yer puss fannybaws."

Be quiet, viginabollocks."

3)

"Bolt, ya mangled fud."

Go away, you misshapen vigina.

4)

"Ye've go a face lit a melted welly."

You look fucking miserable.

5)

"Yer bum's oot the windae, ye fuckin' bampot"

You're talking rubbish, you unhinged tit.

read the rest at...


https://www.buzzfeed.com/hilarywardle/chew-mah-banger

Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Onslow on December 04, 2020, 21:04:36 PM
Google must've sold old GPS data to Facebook.  Getting FB friend recommendations from 2012-2014 customers. I'm not a person of consequence therefore there is no reason for these people to even remember me. This is just damned weird.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 11, 2020, 09:07:08 AM
Illegal Wild Steelhead catch costs Campbell River angler $1,501

Campbell River court charged fisher under B.C. Sport Fishing Regulations

>>>B.C.'s Conservation Officer Service fined a Campbell River angler for killing a Wild Steelhead on the Quinsam River in 2019.

The species is protected from being harvested by closures throughout the province. The incident was reported to the service and to Fisheries and Oceans Canada, who started an investigation into the matter. The investigation led to charges under the B.C. Sport Fishing Regulations.

The angler was fined $1,501 in November, 2020 in Campbell River court for catching and retaining more than the daily quota. The majority ($1,500) of that fine will go to the Oyster River Enhancement society.


https://www.campbellrivermirror.com/news/illegal-wild-steelhead-catch-costs-campbell-river-angler-1501/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: troutrus on December 17, 2020, 18:06:51 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on December 03, 2020, 10:32:07 AMTongass National Forest is 'America's Last Climate Sanctuary'
Opening up the Tongass National Forest to additional logging and development could have serious implications for both the environment and the Alaska Native communities that depend on it.Guests are not allowed to view images in posts, please Register or Login


>>>When you walk into the temperate rainforest of the Tongass, a peaceful stillness greets you. The dense canopy of this misty Alaskan wilderness is made up of towering western hemlock, red and yellow cedar, and Sitka spruce trees, some of which are between 300 and 1,000 years old. Lichens adorn the trees with a mosaic of colors and textures, moss and ferns carpet the forest floor in lush green hues, and crystal-clear streams carve their way toward the Pacific Ocean.

https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/tongass-national-forest-americas-last-climate-sanctuary/

Spent some time in that forest on Prince of Whales Island. Though it was sad to see some of the areas being clear cut, the logging roads opened up many areas to fishing that would otherwise have been inaccessible.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Onslow on December 20, 2020, 19:36:09 PM
https://climate.ncsu.edu/climateblog?id=329

Quotefew drenched days from the tropics' parting shot to the Southeast amounted to a wet month in North Carolina that also featured sustained warmth. That vaulted us closer to potential new annual temperature and precipitation records.

Eta's Moisture Drives Wet Weather
Capping off the hurricane season, tropical moisture from one storm almost single-handedly made it one of the wettest Novembers on record in North Carolina. According to the National Centers for Environmental Information, the preliminary statewide average precipitation of 5.93 inches ranks as our 10th-wettest November since 1895.

Among our rain events during the month, none was as heavy or as impactful as the system on November 10-12 that saw moisture from Tropical Storm Eta pulled northward ahead of a cold front. During that three-day event, totals exceeded 8 inches across the western Piedmont and northern Coastal Plain.

More rain fell on Thanksgiving from another cold front crossing the state. Totals were much lower in this event, with a maximum of about an inch-and-a-half in the southern Mountains.



The month then ended with a final frontal passage on November 30 that brought more than two inches of rain along the coast and an inch or more elsewhere.

Our Taylorsville ECONet station measured 11.31 inches of precipitation during the month, and Rocky Mount also topped the 10-inch mark with 11.69 inches total. Among that amount, 9.86 inches -- or 84% of the monthly rainfall -- fell during the Eta event.

The only part of the state that missed out on the heaviest rain last month was the far western Mountains. Murphy finished the month 2.2 inches below its normal precipitation, while Marshall received only 1.77 inches, about an inch below normal.

However, those sites still ended the climatological fall more than an inch above their normal seasonal precipitation, and parts of the western Piedmont including Hickory and Marion were more than 10 inches above normal from September through November.

Temperatures Set to Simmer
While heavy rain may have been the most noticeable part of our November weather, it was also an especially warm month across the state. NCEI's preliminary data shows the statewide average temperature of 55.2°F ranks as our 3rd-warmest November out of the past 126 years.

The warmth blanketed the entire state, from a tie for the 4th-warmest November since 1907 in Banner Elk to the 5th-warmest in both Charlotte and Raleigh to the 2nd-warmest in Elizabeth City, which recorded the highest temperature in the state last month with an 85°F high on November 11.

One main source of those September-like temperatures was high pressure over the Southeast coastline that ensured a continuing feed of warm air from the south and southwest, even after the firehose from Eta had shut off.



Wilmington recorded 20 days with high temperatures at or above 70°F -- the most there since 2001, and tied for the fourth-most in any November dating back to 1874. Laurinburg hit 70°F or higher on 21 days, which was tied for the second-most November days that warm in the past 74 years.

During the Eta-assisted rain event in the middle of the month, elevated dew points and a saturated air mass even kept the nighttime lows across the southern Piedmont and Coastal Plain in the upper 60s or low 70s -- not far from the average daytime highs for that time of the year!

While cool nights were generally hard to come by, sub-freezing temperatures on the morning of November 19 finally ended the growing season across most of eastern North Carolina except for the extreme southern coastline and the Outer Banks.

A Race for the Records?
In 2018, we wrung out North Carolina's wettest year on record. Last year, we sweated through the state's warmest year on record. Now, amid the craziness of 2020, we have a shot at breaking both records in the same year!

Through the end of November, our year-to-date statewide average precipitation total of 61.69 inches ranks as the wettest on record, a scant 0.40 inches ahead of the pace set by 2018.

The statewide average temperature through the first 11 months of the year is 62.65°F, which is the 3rd-warmest dating back to 1895, and narrowly behind 2017 (62.69°F) and 2019 (62.66°F).

So how extreme does December need to be to break both records? The answer is fairly warm and very wet. The year in 2018 ended with our 3rd-wettest December on record totaling 7.06 inches, so we need a statewide average of at least 6.67 inches this month to break the record. Only six Decembers historically -- 2018, 2015, 2009, 1983, 1973, and 1905 -- have been that wet.

With the sort of La Niña event currently in place that has historically produced drier winter weather in North Carolina, accumulating enough precipitation in the final weeks of the year to stay atop the precipitation rankings could be a tough task.


Monthly mean temperature and precipitation departures from the 1981-2010 average. Based on data from the National Centers for Environmental Information.

Our monthly temperatures need to be slightly warmer than last December, which was the state's 17th-warmest at 5.0°F above the long-term average, in order to break that record. While La Niña winters are often warmer than normal in North Carolina, the current forecast shows temperatures at or below normal over the next week, including highs in the 40s, so we may need to channel some decidedly un-December-like warmth by the holidays in order to contend for the warmest temperature title.

While two new records this year may be tough to achieve, the notion that this year is even in the same ballpark as the current record-holders is a testament to how consistently warm and wet it has been so far in 2020.

Recall that 2018 included up to three feet of rain in parts of southeastern North Carolina from Hurricane Florence, and in 2019, hundred-degree heat lasted all the way into October en route to a record-setting annual average temperature.

That's some elite company when you consider the substantial impacts in those years from flooding and heat stress, and in 2020, it has been tough to distance ourselves from them among our state's climate history.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 31, 2020, 17:01:19 PM
Funny rant from the interwebs


https://www.instagram.com/p/CJelzJlhy9v/?igshid=1lg3a02dbseq
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Onslow on December 31, 2020, 17:50:24 PM
So someone wants unabated harvest?
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 07, 2021, 09:14:02 AM
820 acres supporting old-growth forest protected in Giles, Bland counties

>>>More than 800 acres, mostly in Giles County, have been purchased by the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, protecting many forest species, including chestnut oaks that are over 300 years old, and expanding an existing natural area preserve within an important ecological forest core.

The land will be managed to protect old-growth trees and to promote nature-based carbon sequestration through proforestation — a practice of growing existing forests to their ecological potential — with the possibility of reintroducing the once dominant American chestnut (Castanea dentata) and another decimated species, the butternut tree (Juglans cinerea).

The acquisition expands the 233-acre Chestnut Ridge Natural Area Preserve by 587 acres and brings the privately owned preserve under DCR ownership.

Most of the acreage is in far western Giles County with a small section located in neighboring Bland County


https://augustafreepress.com/820-acres-supporting-old-growth-forest-protected-in-giles-bland-counties/


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Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Onslow on January 08, 2021, 16:12:48 PM
The BRP has requested that the BRP sections of Big Pine Creek and in Allegheny County no longer be stocked by the NCWRC.  Apparently the NPS prohibits the stocking of fish on their property.

Perhaps we could add our comments to the public hearing page, and lobby for a catch & release designation.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 11, 2021, 09:51:46 AM
Flagstaff History: Doney made key discoveries near cave dwellings area

>>>125 years ago
1896: B. F. Doney this week discovered a new lot of cave and cliff dwellings.]

>>>Some months ago he went into the Canyon north of Flagstaff with several burros on a prospecting trip. After about 100 miles of prospecting and finding nothing of note, he ran short of provisions and concluded he would strike out for civilization. Being unable to climb out of the Canyon at that point, he built a raft and started on down river until he reached the dangerous rapids too perilous for his raft. He then managed to climb out and reached Aubury Valley and the railroad, foot sore and half starved.

https://azdailysun.com/news/local/history/flagstaff-history-doney-made-key-discoveries-near-cave-dwellings-area/article_bcdadf88-891c-58ee-9aab-63adad8bdfac.html
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 12, 2021, 09:49:42 AM
SC stocks remote Upstate river with trout via helicopter

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>>>WALHALLA — Every year, the S.C. Department of Natural Resources stocks a remote Upstate river with trout: rainbow, brown and eastern brook.

But the Chattooga River, which comprises more than 20 miles of the northernmost border between South Carolina and Georgia, isn't an easy place to reach. It was declared a "wild and scenic" river by the U.S. Forest Service decades ago and after that happened, several accesses to the waterway via old logging roads were closed.

That's where helicopters come in.

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https://www.postandcourier.com/news/sc-stocks-remote-upstate-river-with-trout-via-helicopter/article_b856dc22-396c-11eb-8b47-2f1a877600ae.html
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: rbphoto on January 13, 2021, 07:09:48 AM
They've been doing helicopter stocking for several years.

I've fished as much of that river as is accessible by foot and some that probably won't be accessible unless we experience another significant drought. 

The fishing can be stellar or it can be miserable, but the river is a beautiful place to which to retreat and seek solitude.

Raymond
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 13, 2021, 10:03:04 AM
Nonnative fish are taking over Maine's lakes and rivers

>>>Nonnative muskies, a species more invasive than bass, can now be found throughout the St. John River system, as well as the Allagash River below Allagash Falls. By most accounts, the wild native brook trout in the St. John River and headwater lakes have all but disappeared. Once the muskies get above Allagash Falls, and they unfortunately likely will, the fabled Allagash River and some of the last large lake brook trout populations in the country will be compromised, or worse, lost.

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>>>The wild native landlocked salmon in West Grand Lake and Grand Lake Stream, one of just four native populations, have been displaced by nonnative smallmouth bass. Most of the salmon now caught are stocked, due to the wild fish being unable to compete with the introduced bass. Sebago Lake, the namesake water of landlocked salmon, Salmo solar sebago, Maine's official State Fish, now has nonnative lake trout, pike, black crappie and largemouth and smallmouth bass.

https://bangordailynews.com/2021/01/12/outdoors/nonnative-fish-are-taking-over-maines-lakes-and-rivers/

Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: jwgnc on January 13, 2021, 23:02:35 PM
Native vs Wild
https://mountainjournal.org/the-debate-over-wild-versus-native-trout?fbclid=IwAR2q87tlzRXuQ2uGuAsiDTZbmfhrCjpSp3snJA7hCTry1m7HW0S397Up8T8 (https://mountainjournal.org/the-debate-over-wild-versus-native-trout?fbclid=IwAR2q87tlzRXuQ2uGuAsiDTZbmfhrCjpSp3snJA7hCTry1m7HW0S397Up8T8)
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 14, 2021, 06:56:06 AM
Quote from: jwgnc on January 13, 2021, 23:02:35 PMNative vs Wild
https://mountainjournal.org/the-debate-over-wild-versus-native-trout?fbclid=IwAR2q87tlzRXuQ2uGuAsiDTZbmfhrCjpSp3snJA7hCTry1m7HW0S397Up8T8 (https://mountainjournal.org/the-debate-over-wild-versus-native-trout?fbclid=IwAR2q87tlzRXuQ2uGuAsiDTZbmfhrCjpSp3snJA7hCTry1m7HW0S397Up8T8)

"More than a century ago, America's government leaders wanted to encourage men to get back in touch with their primal abilities because they thought industrialization had diminished their masculinity, according to a new book written by a University of Colorado professor.

Their cure was to give them something to capture and kill. And so America's waterways were stocked with a fish that fought the line and gave anglers just enough of a challenge: the rainbow trout"

An Entirely Synthetic Dish




I lament the decline of native fish everywhere


Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: troutrus on January 14, 2021, 08:17:13 AM
For the most part, unless you're young and spry enough to climb like a Billy goat, the best  most of us can hope for in the way of trout is wild fish.
One reason I used to enjoy saltwater was due to the thought of wild, native fish that had been around for thousands of years. Now the masses are unhappy with reduced creel limits and many are calling for increased supplemental stocking of flounder, drum, trout, etc. South Carolina has been stocking drum since the eighties. The vast majority of anglers are pleased with that, so that's the way it will be. 'Cause in the end it's all about $$$$$$$.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 23, 2021, 09:20:44 AM
Nice little video story about the Streamwalker net builder.

https://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/rochester/human-interest/2021/01/22/honeoye-man-s-homemade-fishing-nets-are-a-hit-with-sportsmen#

>>>Getting away from it all isn't easy these days.

Leif Mermagen just makes it look like it is.

"Here we are in nature. One thing I say, 'trout don't live in ugly places,'" he said.

"I've been a salesman for as long as I can remember. And I'm good at it but it's worn me a little thin."

Leif fell for fly fishing and found a new groove.

"Just come in here. Relax. Do my thing. Make things I dig."

"My father was one of those guys who figured, 'why buy it when you can make it yourself?'"

Leaf builds every one of his "Streamwalker" nets. The kind of handcrafted outdoor gear sportsmen take everywhere.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 23, 2021, 09:26:56 AM
all you need to know about the Salmon Sausage Market

https://reviewindependent.com/uncategorized/35017/salmon-sausage-market-detailed-report-2020-and-expects-to-see-growth-in-future-till-2026-alaska-sausage-company-salmons-meat-products/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 29, 2021, 09:11:39 AM
Floating in John W. Powell's Wake
A prominent Utah historian sets out to untangle the legend of John W. Powell's explorations

In the 1800s, humans were busy scurrying across the globe prying into the blank spots on the map, why? Because, of course, they were there. From the frozen poles of the Earth to its darkest jungles, we had a guy on it. Here in the United States, the transcontinental railroad had opened up the nation. But, despite nearly a century of poking around by native peoples, Spanish padres, men military, mountain and Mormon, there remained one big question mark over the terrain through which flowed the Green and the Colorado Rivers.

On then-existing maps of the area between Green River Wyoming and St. Thomas, Nevada, there might as well have been a label, in all-caps, bolded, italicized, underlined and with exclamation points: "DO NOT GO!!!!!" No one, at least no one who lived to tell the tale, had ever navigated these rivers. Why? Because it was a really dangerously dumb idea. Still, it was there. So. We put a guy on it. A one-armed Civil War veteran by the name of Major John W. Powell who said (not really) whatever was the 19th Century equivalent of "Hey, man hold my beer, while I try this" and set off to see just exactly what was there. The answer? Hell.




https://www.saltlakemagazine.com/floating-in-john-w-powells-wake/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 29, 2021, 09:36:13 AM
The Ocean's Mysterious Vitamin Deficiency

A puzzling lack of thiamine is disrupting some marine ecosystems.

>>>Disoriented little fish caught the attention of staff members at the Coleman National Fish Hatchery in Red Bluff, California, in early January 2020. Looking down into the outdoor tanks, called raceways, the facility's employees noticed that among the dark, olive-colored clouds of live fish, there were occasional slivers of silver from the undersides of tiny fry that were struggling to swim. The fish would roll onto their sides, sink to the bottom for a moment, spring back upright, swim a few strokes, and then roll over again.

Many were dying, too. While a few hundred mortalities daily in a facility containing millions of fish is normal, something was definitely amiss.

"[Mortality] was in the thousands, and it didn't go down," says Brett Galyean, project leader at the hatchery.

Galyean and his team had already hatched and released into the raceways between six and seven million fish—about half of Coleman's annual production—and the prospect of losing many or most of them began to seem very real.


>>>California researchers now investigating the source of the salmon's nutritional problems find themselves contributing to an international effort to understand thiamine deficiency, a disorder that seems to be on the rise in marine ecosystems across much of the planet. It's causing illness and death in birds, fish, invertebrates, and possibly mammals, leading scientists from Seattle to Scandinavia to suspect some unexplained process is compromising the foundation of the Earth's food web by depleting ecosystems of this critical nutrient.


https://www.hakaimagazine.com/features/the-oceans-mysterious-vitamin-deficiency/

further reading;

https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/feature-story/researchers-probe-deaths-central-valley-chinook-possible-ties-ocean-changes


Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Phil on January 29, 2021, 14:28:39 PM
More depressing news. Thanks Woolly.  :'(
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 02, 2021, 09:05:53 AM
I sure @Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 will find this exciting...

LIZARD LOVER World's tiniest reptile 'with HUGE genitals' found – and it's small enough to fit on your fingertip

>>>THE world's smallest reptile is so tiny it could fit on your fingertip but has genitals so big they're about 20% of its overall size.

The Brookesia nana species of chameleon has been described in a recent study by scientists who were shocked by just how minuscule it is.

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https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/13910614/smallest-reptile-in-the-world/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 03, 2021, 09:09:53 AM
We're number three!!  :Dance



Great Smoky Mountains ranked third-most dangerous national park


>>>GATLINBURG, Tenn. (WATE) — The Great Smoky Mountains National Park was listed the third-most dangerous national park, according to Outforia.

Outforia, a guide for outdoor travels, ranked the most dangerous national parks by the number of deaths between 2010 and 2020, based on data requested from the National Park Service.

According to the data, GSMNP had at least 92 deaths in that 10-year span.

The GSMNP came after the Grand Canyon (No.1) and Yosemite (No.2).
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 04, 2021, 09:03:59 AM
Is fly fishing going to "implode" as a result of the pandemic?

>>>By Kirk Deeter, Editor, Angling Trade Media

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity..." Charles Dickens, from A Tale of Two Cities.

 We all saw what happened.  Last March, we all wondered how the heck we might survive (literally, and in a business sense) the pandemic. Sadly, some did not. Brick-and-mortar-based shopping got hammered. Travel took it on the chin even worse. But (as AT predicted), in the absence of T-ball leagues, and malls, and movie theaters, and all that, people had fewer other recreational options to tap.  And that sent a lot of folks straight to the river (or lake, or ocean), all over the nation.  Some to fish, some to float, some to boat, some to swim and others to merely be there. How many? The Recreational Boating and Fishing Foundation just estimated somewhere around 17 million people.

The " A River Runs Through It" phenomenon that transformed fly-fishing in 1992 is now small potatoes in comparison to what happened in 2020.

https://www.anglingtrade.com/2021/02/03/is-fly-fishing-going-to-implode-as-a-result-of-the-pandemic/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 04, 2021, 09:13:26 AM
Online smelt talk is Feb. 10


>>>An online lecture, "Searching for Smelt: Citizen Science & Maine's Sea Run Fishes," will feature Claire Enterline and Danielle Frechette, research biologists with Maine's Department of Marine Resources. It will take place online at 7 p.m. Feb. 10.

The talk is part of Friends of Merrymeeting Bay's Winter Speaker Series and will be conducted over Zoom, via a link at www.fomb.org.

The Nature Conservancy, Gulf of Maine Research Institute, Downeast Salmon Federation and Maine Department of Marine Resources are collaborating on a project to train and motivate volunteers to help determine where rainbow smelt are spawning each year.

Enterline provides technical leadership regarding sampling methodology, data analysis and development of scientific papers, and also works with coastal managers at the local, state, regional, and federal level to translate scientific analysis into best management practices and management plans.

From 2007-2015, Enterline's research focused on the abundance, population dynamics, habitat, and behavior of rainbow smelt. As part of this work, she was the lead author on the Regional Conservation Plan for Rainbow Smelt, and carried out the first smelt population assessments in Maine since the 1970s.


https://www.pressherald.com/2021/02/03/online-smelt-talk-is-feb-10/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 04, 2021, 10:42:00 AM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on February 04, 2021, 09:03:59 AMIs fly fishing going to "implode" as a result of the pandemic?

https://www.anglingtrade.com/2021/02/03/is-fly-fishing-going-to-implode-as-a-result-of-the-pandemic/

Interesting.  A fishing pal that lives in Blacksburg mentioned this "boom" to me just this week during our phone conversation. 

I even see the surge here in the hills.

Funny, after The Movie, I, and those I fished with, were convinced in a few years we'd see dirt cheap fly angling gear at yard sales and flea markets.  Obviously, that did not materialize.   

My biggest concern is all this hubbub will result in more privatization of waters, and much of the sport will hinge on the almighty dollar.  Perhaps it is inevitable. 

Our only hope, perhaps, is developing a drug for males, guaranteeing huge genitals like the Brookesia nana species of chameleon.  Sporting a unit 20% of a males body size might take care of the masculine desire to learn fly fishing.  All kinds of distracting aspects could emerge (new but unattainable wader design, displayed bravado, explosion in the porn industry, etc.).  I have no idea if this might curtail the developing female interest in the sport of angling, since the wife has been telling me for years that size does not matter.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 04, 2021, 10:50:33 AM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 04, 2021, 10:42:00 AM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on February 04, 2021, 09:03:59 AMIs fly fishing going to "implode" as a result of the pandemic?

https://www.anglingtrade.com/2021/02/03/is-fly-fishing-going-to-implode-as-a-result-of-the-pandemic/

Interesting.  A fishing pal that lives in Blacksburg mentioned this "boom" to me just this week during our phone conversation. 

I even see the surge here in the hills.

Funny, after The Movie, I, and those I fished with, were convinced in a few years we'd see dirt cheap fly angling gear at yard sales and flea markets.  Obviously, that did not materialize.   

My biggest concern is all this hubbub will result in more privatization of waters, and much of the sport will hinge on the almighty dollar.  Perhaps it is inevitable. 

Our only hope, perhaps, is developing a drug for males, guaranteeing huge genitals like the Brookesia nana species of chameleon.  Sporting a unit 20% of a males body size might take care of the masculine desire to learn fly fishing.  All kinds of distracting aspects could emerge (new but unattainable wader design, displayed bravado, explosion in the porn industry, etc.).  I have no idea if this might curtail the developing female interest in the sport of angling, since the wife has been telling me for years that size does not matter.

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Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 06, 2021, 10:18:58 AM
Weather babe, Kate Garner, gives a chilly forecast..

Winter weather advisories issued for parts of Piedmont; snow possible Saturday night, Sunday morning: A winter weather advisory has been issued for parts of the Piedmont Triad. The advisories are in place from 7 p.m. Saturday through 10 a.m. Sunday. Rain will move into the area Saturday evening, wi...






https://myfox8.com/weather-stories/1-2-inches-of-snow-possible-in-parts-of-the-piedmont-saturday-night-sunday-morning/
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 07, 2021, 11:55:32 AM
Highway robbery, $7000 worth of camera equipment and a drone grabbed out of the backseat after smashing the rear window!

https://twitter.com/amegregan5/status/1357950023829360646
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 15, 2021, 13:01:54 PM
rare footage of the woolly bugger, previously know as SK, ski kid, in 1970 waterskiing and swimming back from the ski dock, Kwajalein, Marshall Islands

https://vimeo.com/512606149
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: jwgnc on February 15, 2021, 13:23:55 PM
Recent photo of Woolly Bugger swimming back to the dock
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Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Onslow on February 15, 2021, 17:04:04 PM
My parents and two of my sisters live in the Texas. My eldest lives about 20 miles north of Lampassas. It was 3 degrees this morning, and it has topped out about 16.  I wonder how may cattle will die from dehydration.

Another sis lives in Tyler.  Facebook posts suggest snow over a foot deep.  It appears snowplows exist down there.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Onslow on February 15, 2021, 20:22:31 PM
Looks like some of the mountain communities will see catastrophic icing Wed. night into Thursday.  Meadows of Dan forecast looks rather hellish.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Dougfish on February 15, 2021, 21:05:40 PM
Generator will be ready, gas cans full. I was surprised we did not lose power Friday nite/Saturday morn. Old neighborhood. Overhead lines + lots of big shitty trees.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: bmadd on February 16, 2021, 12:18:13 PM
Roads were funny this morning
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: jwgnc on February 16, 2021, 13:01:13 PM
Quote from: bmadd on February 16, 2021, 12:18:13 PMRoads were funny this morning
Yikes.  NC or VA?  Looks like my home state of Michigan.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: bmadd on February 16, 2021, 14:26:29 PM
Quote from: jwgnc on February 16, 2021, 13:01:13 PM
Quote from: bmadd on February 16, 2021, 12:18:13 PMRoads were funny this morning
Yikes.  NC or VA?  Looks like my home state of Michigan.
West Tennessee
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Phil on February 16, 2021, 15:16:51 PM
We're supposed to get ice Wed night, Thursday, and again Friday morning. My appt for my 2nd Phizer vaccine is Fri. 9:30 a.m. -- 25 miles down highway 321 in Lenoir. Aaack. Hope this doesn't get screwy.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: jwgnc on February 16, 2021, 15:55:55 PM
Quote from: Phil on February 16, 2021, 15:16:51 PM
Quote from: Phil on February 16, 2021, 15:16:51 PMWe're supposed to get ice Wed night, Thursday, and again Friday morning. My appt for my 2nd Phizer vaccine is Fri. 9:30 a.m. -- 25 miles down highway 321 in Lenoir. Aaack. Hope this doesn't get screwy.

I had a similar situation for my first Moderna in Madison County.  Health Department opened up the schedule and said "get here when you can" - found out about it on their Facebook page.  Caldwell's is at https://www.facebook.com/CaldwellCountyHealthDepartmentNC (https://www.facebook.com/CaldwellCountyHealthDepartmentNC).

Good luck.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 16, 2021, 16:21:21 PM
Quote from: Phil on February 16, 2021, 15:16:51 PMWe're supposed to get ice Wed night, Thursday, and again Friday morning. My appt for my 2nd Phizer vaccine is Fri. 9:30 a.m. -- 25 miles down highway 321 in Lenoir. Aaack. Hope this doesn't get screwy.


We've been lucky here on this section of the Allegheny Front.

There must be several still w/o power to the east and south.  My son left Sunday morning around 4am for southside VA.  He's called with news of many lines down, down trees, and long hours – thinks he'll be there several more days replacing poles, lines, and such.

Stay safe folks – spring is near!
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Dougfish on February 16, 2021, 17:29:42 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 16, 2021, 16:21:21 PMThere must be several still w/o power to the east and south.  My son left Sunday morning around 4am for southside VA.  He's called with news of many lines down, down trees, and long hours – thinks he'll be there several more days replacing poles, lines, and such.

Stay safe folks – spring is near!

Neil was out about 48 hrs in Martinsville.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Dougfish on February 20, 2021, 13:54:23 PM
SRTU cleanup this am. In less than a mile of road along the river. 4 guys, 3 hours, 24 bags and a few bulky items. Fukkin humans.
I'm the goober on the right. :Dance 

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Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 20, 2021, 18:56:12 PM
good on ya @Dougfish, sure is a shame that so much trash is just thrown out the windows. And all those tires in the Smith...

Tires should be sold with a deposit.... $10 per tire instead of having to pay a $5 per tire fee to recycle...


jis say'in
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 20, 2021, 19:00:51 PM
good on ya @Dougfish, sure is a shame that so much trash is just thrown out the windows. And all those tires in the Smith...

Tires should be sold with a deposit.... $10 per tire instead of having to pay a $5 per tire fee to recycle...


jis say'in
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on February 20, 2021, 18:56:12 PMgood on ya @Dougfish, sure is a shame that so much trash is just thrown out the windows. And all those tires in the Smith...

Tires should be sold with a deposit.... $10 per tire instead of having to pay a $5 per tire fee to recycle...


jis say'in

imagine if that was the case,

a) peeps (meth heads included) would scour the river for tires..
b) meth heads would drown
c) tires would be stolen off of vehicles
d) nevermind... 
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 20, 2021, 19:31:43 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on February 20, 2021, 19:00:51 PMgood on ya @Dougfish, sure is a shame that so much trash is just thrown out the windows. And all those tires in the Smith...

Tires should be sold with a deposit.... $10 per tire instead of having to pay a $5 per tire fee to recycle...


jis say'in
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on February 20, 2021, 18:56:12 PMgood on ya @Dougfish, sure is a shame that so much trash is just thrown out the windows. And all those tires in the Smith...

Tires should be sold with a deposit.... $10 per tire instead of having to pay a $5 per tire fee to recycle...


jis say'in

imagine if that was the case,

a) peeps (meth heads included) would scour the river for tires..
b) meth heads would drown
c) tires would be stolen off of vehicles
d) nevermind... 

Good job Doug and crew!!!

Used to refer to the Smith trout as junkyard browns.  Those old tires in the river do provide some wonderful refugia for the YOY browns, until they fill with the mica-laden sediments of the region.
Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 21, 2021, 13:36:09 PM
GREAT RIVERS OF THE WEST, LIVE!
Every Wednesday at 6pm - March 3rd through April 21st, 2021

https://www.westernrivers.org/great-rivers-of-the-west-live

Register and get a  chance to Win...

Gear Bonus! All registrants will be automatically entered to win in eight drawings for top-notch gear from Fishpond and Sawyer Oars. (You do not need to attend every presentation to win.)

it's free but they'll ask you to donate...


Title: Re: unlimited odds and ends
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 27, 2021, 12:27:21 PM
Grand Canyon Protection Act passes House
The bill would permanently protect the region around the national park from new mining claims.


>>>The bill, introduced by Arizona Congressman Raúl Grijalva, permanently withdraws about 1 million acres of federal land around Grand Canyon National Park from mining claims, while leaving existing claims alone.

Grijalva said the measure would protect one of the nation's most beloved public lands and the Colorado River from possible contamination from uranium mining.

"We would risk a finite resource like the water in the Colorado River, the Grand Canyon itself, for a limited return given what's available in uranium," Grijalva said.

"I don't think there's anything wrong, nothing wrong, politically or against energy development or anything to say that this is a special place and that it needs to be protected in perpetuity. Period."

https://www.azpm.org/p/home-articles-news/2021/2/26/190161-grand-canyon-protection-act-passes-house/