Blue Ridge Fly Fishermans Forum

General: Fly Fishing BS => The bar is open.... => Topic started by: Woolly Bugger on March 04, 2019, 11:37:47 AM

Title: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 04, 2019, 11:37:47 AM
It's going to be all about the water, sooner than later.


https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/local-nevada/a-future-no-one-could-see-capped-nevadas-share-of-colorado-river-water-1603391/

QuoteWhen representatives from seven Western states met in Santa Fe, New Mexico, to divvy up the Colorado River in 1922, Las Vegas was a dusty railroad stop with fewer than 2,500 residents.
No one could have imagined this isolated desert community would one day become an international destination with more than 2 million residents and 40 million annual visitors.
No one thought Nevada would ever need more water than it eventually got from those early Colorado River negotiations.

“It strikes me as a forgivable failure of imagination,” said historian Christian Harrison, who earned his doctorate from UNLV. “They probably thought they would land people on Mars before we had so many people living in this valley.”

QuoteWhen construction of Hoover Dam began in 1931, fewer than 100,000 people lived in Nevada, and most of them were in the northern half of the state, far beyond the river’s reach. Clark County, population 8,500, was home to some mines, a few modest farming operations and a newly legal gaming industry, but nothing that seemed to require a major new source of water or the means of delivering it.

Current estimated population 2.2 Million in Clark County 3.1 Million for the state.

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 04, 2019, 11:46:29 AM
Colorado River’s decline poses long-term risks for Southern Nevada


QuoteIt supplies water and power to 40 million people from Wyoming to Mexico and irrigates billions of dollars in cropland used to feed millions more.
No wonder so many people are worried about the Colorado River. Punishing drought has ravaged the system for almost 20 years, shrinking its two largest reservoirs to a record low 40 percent of combined capacity.

A bleached bathtub ring 130 feet tall marks the decline of Lake Mead, which supplies 90 percent of the water used by nearly three-quarters of Nevada residents. That white stripe on the
cliffs surrounding the nation’s largest reservoir is expected to grow another 30 feet over the next two years as farms and cities downstream continue to divert more water than the Colorado can reliably provide.

https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/local-nevada/colorado-rivers-decline-poses-long-term-risks-for-southern-nevada-1603454/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 08, 2019, 04:11:17 AM
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/03/india-diverting-30-rivers-to-solve-historic-water-crisis/

QuoteIndia today faces a water emergency of historic proportions, with an estimated 600 million peopleâ€"about half the populationâ€"grappling with either severe water shortages or polluted water supplies. Government engineers propose to ease the crisis by shunting “excess” water from one riverbed to another, a colossal refit of nature’s designs that also could help control monsoon flooding, boost irrigation, and generate hydropower for the country’s water-thirsty citizens.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Onslow on March 08, 2019, 05:43:57 AM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 08, 2019, 04:11:17 AMhttps://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/03/india-diverting-30-rivers-to-solve-historic-water-crisis/

QuoteIndia today faces a water emergency of historic proportions, with an estimated 600 million peopleâ€"about half the populationâ€"grappling with either severe water shortages or polluted water supplies. Government engineers propose to ease the crisis by shunting “excess” water from one riverbed to another, a colossal refit of nature’s designs that also could help control monsoon flooding, boost irrigation, and generate hydropower for the country’s water-thirsty citizens.

Why, so they can double their population in the next 30 years, and export another 500,000,000 to Europe and the US? They don't have a water problem, they have a population management problem!
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 08, 2019, 07:08:27 AM
Quote from: Onslow on March 08, 2019, 05:43:57 AMWhy, so they can double their population in the next 30 years, and export another 500,000,000 to Europe and the US? They don't have a water problem, they have a population management problem!


Corrected: “They don't have a water problem, we have a population management problem!

From my colonized county of 4500 souls, I say, insular reasoning will get us nowhere

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthieu-ricard/we-are-all-responsible_b_8201790.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on March 08, 2019, 07:33:37 AM
Man, that scenario would be about as crazy as saying someone could lay pipes through mountains and other obstacles to move water to New York City. Or, we could rob headwaters of a river that flows southwest to the Pacific and pipe it east over the western continental divide so people in Denver can water their lawns.
Dang, we would never be so stupid as to do that!
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 09, 2019, 13:16:21 PM
Plans to pump the Mojave desert aquafer dry in order to supplement water need of Los Angeles!


QuoteCADIZ VALLEY, Calif. â€" The landscape here is more Martian than Earthly, rust and tan plains that rise in the distance to form the Old Woman Mountains to the east and the Bristols and Marbles to the north and west.
Almost everything here is protected by the federal government. The opportunity or threat, depending on your point of view, lies beneath the dusty surface that, after a recent rain, blooms with sprays of yellow desert dandelion.
There is water here in the Mojave Desert. A lot of it.
Whether to tap it on a commercial scale or leave it alone is a decades-old question the Trump administration has revived and the California legislature is visiting anew. The debate will help resolve whether private enterprise can effectively manage a public necessity in a state where who gets water and where it originates endures as the most volatile political issue.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/a-massive-aquifer-lies-beneath-the-mojave-desert-could-it-help-solve-californias-water-problem/2019/03/03/a5d8fe14-354e-11e9-af5b-b51b7ff322e9_story.html?utm_term=.b2f658a3b04e
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 09, 2019, 15:22:32 PM
I saw an ad for miracle water from this prophet last week on late night TV.  His "Biblical point of contact" H2O might just save the world from total annihilation.

https://peterpopoff.org/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 13, 2019, 11:04:33 AM
Quote from: undefinedPHOENIX â€" A major Southern California water agency is trying to push the state through a final hurdle in joining a larger plan to preserve a key river in the U.S. West that serves 40 million people.
Most of the seven states that get water from the Colorado River have signed off on plans to keep the waterway from crashing amid a prolonged drought, climate change and increased demands. But California and Arizona have not, missing deadlines from the federal government.

Arizona has some work to do but nothing major holding it back. California, however, has two powerful water agencies fighting over how to get the drought contingency plan approved before U.S. officials possibly impose their own rules for water going to California, Arizona and Nevada.

QuoteThat agency, the Imperial Irrigation District, has said it won't approve the plan unless the federal government agrees to commit $200 million to address the Salton Sea, a massive, briny lake southeast of Los Angeles that has become an environmental and health hazard in the Imperial and Coachella valleys
.

wait, CA needs Federal money...


https://www.abc15.com/news/state/california-agencies-at-odds-over-colorado-river-drought-plan
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 16, 2019, 12:19:46 PM
QuoteFor the moment, Mother Nature is smiling on the Colorado River.
Enough snow has piled up in the mountains that feed the river to stave off a dreaded shortage declaration for one more year, according to federal projections released Friday afternoon.

Just a month ago, forecasters expected Lake Mead to start 2020 about 17 feet lower than it is now, below the trigger point for a first-ever federal shortage declaration on the drought-stricken river.

But several weeks of winter storms across the Mountain States have cut the lake’s expected decline by Jan. 1 roughly in half, leaving the reservoir east of Las Vegas safely above the shortage line, according to the new figures from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

QuoteIn January, they were predicting another dry year, with just 64 percent of the average flow during the river’s peak April through July snowmelt period. By mid-February, that runoff forecast had increased to 74 percent. It hit 102 percent in the Bureau of Reclamation’s latest batch of monthly projections, and Miller said it could climb as high as 130 percent a month from now.

If the latest forecast holds, it would mark just the sixth year of above average flows since 2000 for the river system that supplies 90 percent of the Las Vegas Valley’s drinking water.

“It’s been a much better year than last year. It’s still not enough to break the drought, but it’s certainly a step in the right direction,” Miller said. “My guess is it will get even better. I’m not sure if it will be enough to keep Lake Mead out of shortage.”

https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/local-nevada/wet-winter-likely-to-keep-colorado-river-out-of-shortage-next-year-1619331/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 18, 2019, 14:55:57 PM
Regional snowmaking expansions a growing concern


An environmental group is raising concerns that the cumulative impacts of numerous snowmaking expansion projects proposed or underway at ski areas throughout the region are not being adequately evaluated by the U.S. Forest Service.

Snowmaking is both a cause of and a response to climate change, Wilderness Workshop argues in an objection filed in response to the White River National Forest’s approval of Aspen Skiing Co.’s project to expand snowmaking and terrain on Aspen Mountain.

The Carbondale-based nonprofit’s objection requested the Forest Service withdraw its November decision in support of the Aspen Mountain project so that a “programmatic environmental impact statement” (EIS) can be drafted looking at the bigger picture. The objection focuses on impacts of increased river depletions to endangered fish in the Colorado River, changes to runoff patterns and increased energy use associated with the system expansions.

https://www.aspendailynews.com/news/regional-snowmaking-expansions-a-growing-concern/article_ffc1a42c-492f-11e9-a5ec-af32490855b3.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 25, 2019, 17:41:36 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/25/california-water-drought-scarce-saudi-arabia

Saudi-based Almarai owns 15,000 acres of an irrigated valley â€" but what business does a foreign food production company have drawing resources from a US desert?

Four hours east of Los Angeles, in a drought-stricken area of a drought-afflicted state, is a small town called Blythe where alfalfa is king. More than half of the town’s 94,000 acres are bushy blue-green fields growing the crop.

Massive industrial storehouses line the southern end of town, packed with thousands upon thousands of stacks of alfalfa bales ready to be fed to dairy cows â€" but not cows in California’s Central Valley or Montana’s rangelands.

Instead, the alfalfa will be fed to cows in Saudi Arabia.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 25, 2019, 17:48:18 PM
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kalw/audio/2019/03/03-25-19yc.mp3

One Planet: Climate change and the Colorado River Podcast
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on March 25, 2019, 17:52:33 PM
Quotehttps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/25/california-water-drought-scarce-saudi-arabia

Saudi-based Almarai owns 15,000 acres of an irrigated valley â€" but what business does a foreign food production company have drawing resources from a US desert?

Four hours east of Los Angeles, in a drought-stricken area of a drought-afflicted state, is a small town called Blythe where alfalfa is king. More than half of the town’s 94,000 acres are bushy blue-green fields growing the crop.

Massive industrial storehouses line the southern end of town, packed with thousands upon thousands of stacks of alfalfa bales ready to be fed to dairy cows â€" but not cows in California’s Central Valley or Montana’s rangelands.

Instead, the alfalfa will be fed to cows in Saudi Arabia.
This is the kind of shit that makes me crazy.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: rbphoto on March 26, 2019, 13:34:35 PM
Quote from: Dougfish on March 25, 2019, 17:52:33 PM
Quotehttps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/25/california-water-drought-scarce-saudi-arabia

Saudi-based Almarai owns 15,000 acres of an irrigated valley â€" but what business does a foreign food production company have drawing resources from a US desert?

Four hours east of Los Angeles, in a drought-stricken area of a drought-afflicted state, is a small town called Blythe where alfalfa is king. More than half of the town’s 94,000 acres are bushy blue-green fields growing the crop.

Massive industrial storehouses line the southern end of town, packed with thousands upon thousands of stacks of alfalfa bales ready to be fed to dairy cows â€" but not cows in California’s Central Valley or Montana’s rangelands.

Instead, the alfalfa will be fed to cows in Saudi Arabia.
This is the kind of shit that makes me crazy.

There is a ton of money in the Middle East, and they don't mind spending it.  They just do it in ways that most of us don't think about.

My brother-in-law flies over there a few times a year as a dairy consultant.  He attempted to broker some U.S. based feed deals to supply them since they can't grow what they need over there. 

Your example above is exactly they mindset they have about how to supply their needs.

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 06, 2019, 16:58:43 PM
https://www.gjsentinel.com/news/western_colorado/where-the-rivers-join/article_f0f2809c-582a-11e9-bd02-20677ce85d90.html

Brian Mahoney has been eyeing public access for properties along the Colorado riverfront since 1986, but he's always had his sights set on an elusive, high-rising parcel that just happens to include the junction of the Colorado and Gunnison rivers.

There have been notable overtures by Mahoney and others in the past to buy the property — owned for years by salvage yard operator Dean Van Gundy, and now owned by his son Randy — but a confluence of factors may be stirring together now to make some sort of sale of the property a reality.

You cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 09, 2019, 15:34:52 PM
In Colorado River's Final Hundred Miles, Small Signs Of Life Return

QuoteLAGUNA GRANDE, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO — It's mid-morning in the Sonoran desert and already the temperature is rising.
Karen Schlatter suggests we find some shade, a relatively easy task at Laguna Grande, a restoration site along the Colorado River's historic channel in Mexico. It's managed by the Sonoran Institute, where Schlatter is associate director of the binational environmental group's Colorado River Delta program.

Read the rest:
https://www.kunc.org/post/colorado-rivers-final-hundred-miles-small-signs-life-return#stream/1

or listen:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kunc/audio/2019/04/lr_deltaseries3_web.mp3

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 09, 2019, 15:57:24 PM
As The Colorado River Basin Dries, Can An Accidental Oasis Survive?

QuoteJuan Butrón-Méndez navigates a small metal motorboat through a maze of tall reeds here in the Mexican state of Sonora. It's nearing sunset, and the sky is turning shades of light blue and purple.
The air smells of wet earth, an unfamiliar scent in the desert.
 

Luke Runyon reports from the Colorado River's "accidental wetland." Butrón-Méndez lives nearby and works for the conservation group Pronatura Noroeste as a bird monitor. (Pronatura's work receives financial support from the Walton Family Foundation, which also funds KUNC's Colorado River coverage.)

Read the rest: https://www.kunc.org/post/colorado-river-basin-dries-can-accidental-oasis-survive#stream/1

or listen: https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kunc/audio/2019/04/lr_deltaseries2_web.mp3

associated reading: A Sand County Almanac (https://amzn.to/2I7jPE5)
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 09, 2019, 16:35:00 PM
Five Years Later, Effects Of Colorado River Pulse Flow Still Linger

QuoteAN LUIS RIO COLORADO, MEXICO — From inside a small airplane, tracing the Colorado River along the Arizona-California border, it's easy to see how it happened.
As the river bends and weaves through the American Southwest, its contents are slowly drained. Concrete canals send water to millions of people in Phoenix and Tucson, Los Angeles and San Diego. Farms, ribbons of green contrasted against the desert's shades of brown, line the waterway.

Further downstream, near Yuma, Arizona, the river splits into threads, like a frayed piece of yarn.

read the rest: https://www.kunc.org/post/five-years-later-effects-colorado-river-pulse-flow-still-linger#stream/1

or listen: https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kunc/audio/2019/04/lr_deltaseries1_web.mp3

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 06, 2019, 13:45:17 PM
Changing water flow leads to more bugs in the Grand Canyon

QuoteLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Ted Kennedy sums up what he sees along the river in the Grand Canyon: "It's buggy out there."
That is to say, an experiment to change the flow of water from a dam near the Arizona-Utah state line appeared to boost the number of aquatic insects that fish in the Colorado River eat.
 
Scientists are hoping to better understand those results with a second bug flow experiment that started this month and will run through August. They found that releasing low, steady flows of water from Glen Canyon Dam over the weekend gives the eggs that bugs lay on rocks, wood or cattails just below the water's surface a better chance of survival. Otherwise, they might dry out and die within an hour.

"It's a powerful reminder that flows really matter, that just a couple days a week of steady flow can illicit massive emergence," said Kennedy, a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.

https://www.bendbulletin.com/nation/7137813-151/changing-water-flow-leads-to-more-bugs-in
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 06, 2019, 13:53:08 PM
50 years of restoring Donegal Creek wild trout stream heartbreakingly undone in hours


QuoteNature is a great healer. It also can be achingly fragile, as fly fishers who love Donegal Creek in East Donegal Township found out last weekend.

One minute, the spring-fed stream that has been lovingly restored into a wild trout stream over five decades was flowing peacefully through rolling Lancaster County farmland. Then something toxic came barreling downstream near the stream's confluence with Musser Run, wiping out, within hours, nearly every kind of fish, crayfish and aquatic insect along a 4.5-mile stretch.

On Sunday, when fly anglers who had caught rising trout only days before drove over to see the damage for themselves, they were dumbstruck and broken-hearted by what they saw. Wild and stocked trout, their beautiful stripes and colorful specks already bleached from their bodies, lay on sandy banks or bobbed in unnatural positions in the water. The carnage also included sculpin, dace, chubs, minnows, salamanders and all manner of aquatic insects.

https://lancasteronline.com/sports/outdoors/years-of-restoring-donegal-creek-wild-trout-stream-heartbreakingly-undone/article_2949e584-6d07-11e9-ace1-0bd7f7e295e0.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on May 06, 2019, 15:27:22 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on May 06, 2019, 13:45:17 PMChanging water flow leads to more bugs in the Grand Canyon

QuoteLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Ted Kennedy sums up what he sees along the river in the Grand Canyon: "It's buggy out there."
That is to say, an experiment to change the flow of water from a dam near the Arizona-Utah state line appeared to boost the number of aquatic insects that fish in the Colorado River eat.
 
Scientists are hoping to better understand those results with a second bug flow experiment that started this month and will run through August. They found that releasing low, steady flows of water from Glen Canyon Dam over the weekend gives the eggs that bugs lay on rocks, wood or cattails just below the water's surface a better chance of survival. Otherwise, they might dry out and die within an hour.

"It's a powerful reminder that flows really matter, that just a couple days a week of steady flow can illicit massive emergence," said Kennedy, a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.

https://www.bendbulletin.com/nation/7137813-151/changing-water-flow-leads-to-more-bugs-in

Hmmm. Sounds like the Smiff.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 14, 2019, 15:14:02 PM
https://www.nrdc.org/media/2019/190514

Fishing and Conservation Groups Sue Country's Largest Agricultural Water District Over Illegal Plot to Raise Shasta Dam

Dam Raise Would Flood the Protected Wild and scenic McCloud River, Tribe's Remaining Sacred Sites and Harm Fisheries
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 22, 2019, 09:22:59 AM
https://www.capeandislands.org/post/trout-mill-brook-indicator-struggling-ecosystem

The Mill Brook in West Tisbury on Martha's Vineyard used to run "thick with fish," but that's no longer the case. As its waters warm from pollution and climate change, the trout, which require cool water temperatures, are becoming less and less numerous. Environmentalists say the trout are indicator of a challenged ecosystem.


Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 03, 2019, 12:30:11 PM
John Wesley Powell First Descended the Grand Canyon 150 Years Ago, Here's How It's Changed Since

QuoteThe completion of the Glen Canyon Dam upstream of the Grand Canyon in 1963 resulted in reverberating changes to the canyon's water and sediment flows. These changes have altered the evolution and morphology, or the physical shape, of the Colorado River, along with the surrounding landscapes and the living things that evolved along the riverway.

Well-documented changes to the river system include variation in water temperature, the timing and duration of flood events and lack of replenishing sediment, all resulting from the regulated releases of cold, sediment-free water from Lake Powell.


https://www.brfff.com/forum/index.php?action=post;topic=15529.0;last_msg=162294
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 08, 2019, 11:02:54 AM
I never really enjoyed the beach, any beach.  It is a flatland/salt/sand thing, but these photos are alarming. 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/heres-what-pollution-has-done-to-these-once-pristine-beaches/ss-AACFl4u?ocid=spartandhp
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 08, 2019, 11:24:30 AM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 08, 2019, 11:02:54 AMI never really enjoyed the beach, any beach.  It is a flatland/salt/sand thing, but these photos are alarming. 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/heres-what-pollution-has-done-to-these-once-pristine-beaches/ss-AACFl4u?ocid=spartandhp


yup we're shitting plastic all over the world at an alarming rate... try and buy anything without excess plastic packaging... but i read recently that Pepsi will be canning water to reduce reliance on plasti bottles...
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 09, 2019, 11:28:35 AM

Environment Report: The Earthquake Risk No One's Talking About
A quake, even one so far away that nobody in San Diego feels it, could cause an emergency and force mandatory water-use restrictions.


QuoteIn one worst-case scenario identified by the system's operator, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, a tunnel near Palm Springs would collapse during a quake and cut off flows for six months.

https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/science-environment/environment-report-the-earthquake-risk-no-ones-talking-about/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 21, 2019, 11:21:54 AM
Battlefields part of drinking water protection effort


QuoteAbout two miles from the heart of Shepherdstown is the site of the bloodiest battle in West Virginia during the American Civil War. More than 600 Union and Confederate soldiers died in a two-day battle in September 1862.

The Battle of Shepherdstown may have been small in comparison to other battles of the Civil War, but historians agree, the battle not only halted the Confederates' northern invasion, but it also opened the door for President Abraham Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

Since 2011, the site of the Battle of Shepherdstown has been a protected historic landmark. The battle site also happens to be at a unique location — along the Potomac River. The Potomac provides drinking water to Shepherdstown residents, and other nearby areas.

https://www.wral.com/battlefields-part-of-drinking-water-protection-effort/18518550/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 21, 2019, 15:39:41 PM
https://kutv.com/news/local/51-foot-difference-in-water-level-at-lake-powell-from-increased-runoff-in-last-3-months

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Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on July 21, 2019, 18:49:36 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on July 21, 2019, 11:21:54 AMBattlefields part of drinking water protection effort


QuoteAbout two miles from the heart of Shepherdstown is the site of the bloodiest battle in West Virginia during the American Civil War. More than 600 Union and Confederate soldiers died in a two-day battle in September 1862.

The Battle of Shepherdstown may have been small in comparison to other battles of the Civil War, but historians agree, the battle not only halted the Confederates' northern invasion, but it also opened the door for President Abraham Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

Since 2011, the site of the Battle of Shepherdstown has been a protected historic landmark. The battle site also happens to be at a unique location — along the Potomac River. The Potomac provides drinking water to Shepherdstown residents, and other nearby areas.

https://www.wral.com/battlefields-part-of-drinking-water-protection-effort/18518550/

Sharpsburg/Antietum is just across the river. Real bloodshed.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 24, 2019, 09:53:07 AM
The Murder and Resurrection of the Colorado River, Part One - Six

https://pagosadailypost.com/2019/10/15/editorial-the-murder-and-resurrection-of-the-colorado-river-part-one/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 02, 2019, 12:14:27 PM
Controversial Pesticides Are Suspected Of Starving Fish

https://www.wfdd.org/story/controversial-pesticides-are-suspected-starving-fish
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Onslow on November 02, 2019, 12:48:20 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on November 02, 2019, 12:14:27 PMControversial Pesticides Are Suspected Of Starving Fish

https://www.wfdd.org/story/controversial-pesticides-are-suspected-starving-fish

Many people do not understand the secondary impacts of herbicides on insects.  It may not be the chemicals that are diminishing the populations.  I'm of the opinion removing various varieties of vegetation diminish the nectar, resins, and pollen, insects need to survive.  Insects need a continuous flow of food throughout the course of the active season.  Once cannot expect a human to live off of mac and cheese for 6 months, and starve the remaining six months....and this is what some insects are having to contend with in heavy ag areas down east.

That being said, no till farming has been a boon for my bees.  Fields around my bee yard are covered with chickweed, deadnettle, and gillflower during the Winter months.  When the fields are sprayed, other sources of nectar such as poplars, apple trees, and clover, and hedge are available.  That being said, the latter are becoming less available due to deforestation and field sanitizing.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 04, 2019, 12:36:14 PM
 n!n

SEATTLE -- In a report released this week, a national group highlighted Chinook salmon as one of the top 10 species imperiled by pesticides.
The Endangered Species Coalition released its 2019 report, Poisoned by Pesticides, which included Chinook salmon. The report said pesticides sprayed nearby reach rivers and enter salmon streams through contaminated runoff, killing salmon prey and impacting salmon's ability to swim and evade predators.
The report also linked the toxic salmon to the critically-endangered southern resident orcas, which primarily rely on fatty Chinook salmon to survive and are impacted by toxins when the whales are nutritionally deficient and access fat storage, where toxins are also stored.

https://q13fox.com/2019/11/01/national-group-says-pesticides-poisoning-pacific-northwest-salmon/

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on November 04, 2019, 15:15:52 PM
Humans suck.  n!n  :;!  p;-
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 18, 2019, 13:38:31 PM
QuoteThe Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Monday is expected to rule on a company's request to pursue a permit to build two hydroelectric dams on the Little Colorado River not far upstream from the main Colorado River as it flows into Grand Canyon National Park.
The plan envisioned by Pumped Hydro Storage, LLC, of Phoenix, is to construct one dam rising 240 feet above the Little Colorado and another 140 feet high. The proposed Navajo National Salt Trail Canyon Pumped Storage Project would also include six 250-megawatt, turbine-generator units, for a total installed capacity of 1,500 megawatts, a 20-mile-long, 500-kilovolt transmission line from the powerhouse to the existing Moenkopi switchyard, and related facilities.
At peak capacity, such a setup would have an average annual generation of 3,300 gigawatt-hours, according to FERC.
The current filing, if approved by FERC, would not allow the company to begin construction. Rather, it would "grant the permit holder priority to file a license application during the permit term."
Opponents fear that if the project is eventually approved, it would harm the endangered humpback chub and most definitely disrupt the ecosystem within Grand Canyon National Park.

https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/2019/11/dams-proposed-little-colorado-river-upstream-grand-canyon-national-park

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 03, 2019, 15:26:55 PM
New book out on the history of the Colorado water rights mismanagement!
https://amzn.to/2rUUxly



Politicians knew the inconvenient truth about the Colorado River 100 years ago — and ignored it


QuoteEarlier this year, the seven states that depend on the Colorado River made history. For the first time, Arizona, California, Utah, Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico agreed to find ways to reduce the amount of water they draw from the river as levels drop further at Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the country.
The Colorado River provides water for 40 million people. But its flows are shrinking as the planet heats up, reducing the snowpack that feeds the river and causing more water to evaporate as the river snakes its way from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California.

But even if climate change weren't an issue, the Colorado would probably still be in trouble. Back in 1922, when states originally divvied up water from the river, they grossly overestimated the amount of water flowing through it. This set in motion a series of decisions that led to the shortages today. States are dipping into Lake Mead's reserves, overdrawing 1.2 million acre feet of water annually — enough to quench the thirst of a couple million households for a year.

https://grist.org/climate/politicians-knew-the-inconvenient-truth-about-the-colorado-river-100-years-ago-and-ignored-it/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 07, 2019, 17:06:15 PM
read the full story  (https://therevelator.org/edwards-dam-removal/?fbclid=IwAR0hlGIYj5Jv83J0yl1Dd_2U-TjYPSlKDaMZU-s2IRiHogxOhPaBFckDlFY&utm_campaign=coschedule&utm_source=facebook_page&utm_medium=American%20Rivers&utm_content=How%20Removing%20One%20Maine%20Dam%2020%20Years%20Ago%20Changed%20Everything%20%E2%80%A2%20The%20Revelato)

How Removing One Maine Dam 20 Years Ago Changed Everything


Welcome to the first edition of "Turning Points," our new column examining critical moments in environmental history when change occurred for the better — or worse.

More than 1,000 people lined the banks of the Kennebec River in Augusta, Maine, on July 1, 1999. They were there to witness a rebirth.

The ringing of a bell signaled a backhoe on the opposite bank to dig into a retaining wall. Water trickled, then gushed. The crowd erupted in cheers as the Edwards Dam, which had stretched 900 feet across the river, was breached. Soon the whole dam would be removed.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 20, 2020, 18:08:39 PM
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2020/01/mayfly-insect-populations-in-decline/


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Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 16, 2020, 11:18:27 AM
https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/podcast/2020-02-16-national-parks-traveler-episode-53-special-report-colorado-river-grand-portage-nm
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 25, 2020, 10:29:47 AM
This dam is damned



Key California reservoir to be drained due to earthquake risk

https://www.bakersfield.com/ap/national/key-california-reservoir-to-be-drained-due-to-earthquake-risk/article_24654552-0272-5057-80bf-033b1d3f7099.html

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 29, 2020, 10:29:35 AM
For first time in 20 years, feds take deep look at hydroelectric dam removal on Lower Snake River


QuoteThe futures of hydropower, salmon and orcas in the Pacific Northwest are at stake in the first assessment in 20 years of the environmental effects of dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers.

Federal agencies are set to release a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) of dam operations on Friday, opening a 45-day public comment period. On the table will be a range of alternatives for operation of 14 dams in the federal Columbia River hydropower system, including a preferred alternative.

The review was required by a federal judge in 2016, and must, among other things, assess dam removal on the Lower Snake.
It's the first new look at river operations across the entire Columbia Basin since new challenges have emerged for endangered species and the region's power grid.

A warming climate has made both ocean conditions and the freshwater river environment tougher for salmon. Another endangered species has also been listed since the last EIS: the endangered southern resident orcas that frequent Puget Sound.


https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/for-first-time-in-20-years-feds-take-deep-look-at-hydrodam-removal-on-lower-snake-river/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 24, 2020, 08:35:07 AM
World Water Day: 11 Rivers Facing a Danger of Drying Up in America
These 11 rivers in the United States are at risk of drying up very soon.

https://interestingengineering.com/world-water-day-11-rivers-facing-a-danger-of-drying-up-in-america
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 29, 2020, 11:43:33 AM
https://www.eenews.net/stories/1062829919

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Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 04, 2020, 10:40:41 AM
Battle Over Pebble Mine About to Hit a Turning Point

The world's most controversial mine is up for a significant permit. Here's why critics say they shouldn't get it and what you can do about it

https://www.fieldandstream.com/story/fishing/battle-over-pebble-mine-hitting-a-major-turning-point/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 08, 2020, 11:37:36 AM
WORLD OCEAN DAY: ALTERNATIVE SEAFOOD OFFERS TWIN SOLUTION TO ADDRESS FOOD SECURITY, PLANET'S HEALTH

>>>Northern Harvest Sea Farms is a Canadian division of the Norwegian salmon fishing giant Mowi. In October 2019, Northern Harvest made a shocking announcement. A month earlier, they had lost 2.6 million Atlantic salmon – about 5000 metric tonnes – from their aquaculture operations on the coast of Canada. The fish had died due to a few weeks of excessively warm waters in early September. After a month of cleaning up dead fish in Fortune Bay, contracting a large number of divers and vessels to assist, the Managing Director of the company said they had finished 87 percent of the task – "The salmon mortalities comprise approximately half of all Northern Harvest fish in the water." Half of the entire company's inventory – gone.


https://www.firstpost.com/tech/science/world-ocean-day-alternative-seafood-offers-twin-solution-to-address-food-security-planets-health-8460921.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 22, 2020, 15:58:18 PM
>>> The historic dam at the Ward's Mill along Watauga River near Sugar Grove is being removed this year.

"That is the plan," said Virginia Ward, adding that the future removal will be bittersweet.

"You know it will be okay to let it go. It will open the river and I believe that will be good ... but it's a bit sad, too. We have multiple emotions. Let's put it that way."


https://onthewatauga.com/news/ward-dam-on-watauga-river-in-sugar-grove-to-be-removed/

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 16, 2020, 16:23:18 PM
We now know how many billions of gallons of water Colorado will save by closing coal-fired power plants

By 2031 water use for coal-fired power plants in Colorado will drop to 3.7 billion gallons – a 68% reduction, according to the Energy and Policy Institute.

https://coloradosun.com/2020/07/16/water-saved-closing-coal-power-plants-colorado/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 17, 2020, 11:45:24 AM
Grays Creek in Surry County is now part of Virginia's Scenic Rivers Program.

https://m.smithfieldtimes.com/2020/07/16/grays-creek-named-state-scenic-river/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 17, 2020, 12:21:49 PM


>>> Sudan and Egypt have hit out at Ethiopia, which has started filling a reservoir behind a controversial new dam on the Blue Nile.
Satellite images show water backing up on the Grand Renaissance Dam and now Sudan has reported reduced water flow in its section of the Nile River. Both Sudan and Egypt are downstream and are worried the dam will reduce their access to water.
A deal between Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan over the reservoir is proving elusive. Instead there's a fraught stand-off with national pride, regional power and economic development at stake.

Why can't Egypt and Ethiopia agree on the Nile dam? https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-53441396
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 24, 2020, 10:26:27 AM
Conditions 'pretty grim' for endangered fish locally due to falling river flows


>>>The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has begun asking for water releases from high-country reservoirs to boost water flows in the Colorado River upstream of the Gunnison River confluence and aid endangered fish, while being careful not to exhaust available water that may be needed for the species later in the year.

The agency is seeing what U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hydrologist Don Anderson on Wednesday said are "quickly deteriorating flow conditions" on what's called the 15-Mile Reach of the river between the Gunnison confluence and where Grand Valley irrigation diversions occur upstream.

Speaking in a conference call with upstream reservoir operators, local irrigation officials and others who work to cooperatively manage Colorado River flow levels, he said flows in the stretch Wednesday were around 450 cubic feet per second. The longterm median flow at Palisade below where Grand Valley diversions occur is 1,780 cfs for July 23, according to U.S. Geological Survey streamflow data.


https://www.gjsentinel.com/news/western_colorado/conditions-pretty-grim-for-endangered-fish-locally-due-to-falling-river-flows/article_d5cdd57a-cc5d-11ea-8786-abca954679f1.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 27, 2020, 12:13:51 PM
'World's longest art gallery' makes Nine Mile Canyon unique

>>>The team of archaeologists and students who arrived in Utah from Harvard University's Peabody Museum in 1931 were familiar with the abundance of prehistoric ruins and images throughout the region. Even so, Nine Mile Canyon surprised them.

In field notes, Donald Scott, the leader of the expedition, described the canyon as "almost a continuous picture gallery."

Guide and photographer David Rust was a Utah native who had led archaeologists and others to ancient sites across much of the Colorado Plateau. But the extent of such sites in Nine Mile Canyon caused him to write several journal entries such as "ruins everywhere" and "ruins all around."

https://www.gjsentinel.com/news/western_colorado/world-s-longest-art-gallery-makes-nine-mile-canyon-unique/article_64b3cf4e-cddd-11ea-8481-9b0b803b0547.html

This is the book in the article

and a podcast too... APEX Hour at SUU Check it out here: