Blue Ridge Fly Fishermans Forum

General: Fly Fishing BS => The bar is open.... => Topic started by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 14, 2017, 10:43:29 AM

Title: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 14, 2017, 10:43:29 AM
In honor of Beetle and his request – let's get this party started.  Plus, we might as well introduce a cool word from the book.

I'm reading this one now – very good read.

The Invention of Nature, Alexander Von Humboldt's New World, by Andrea Wulf

cajole – to persuade or coax

This one is my fun re-read.

Alaska's Wolf Man, by Jim Rearden

cheeckako - a greenhorn
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 14, 2017, 11:29:48 AM
I'm in the middle of Woolly's suggested read: "The River of Doubt: Theodore Roosevelt's Darkest Journey"

I'm also in the middle of John Galligan's fly-fishing mystery series. I think I'm currently immersed on the third book of the series.

As of lately, I struggle to find time to sit down and read in peace. Pisses me off. I have books stacked on my desk at work, nightstand at home, and tables and counters throughout other parts of my house - and no time to enjoy. Sad.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on March 14, 2017, 11:41:56 AM
Anything and everything Bryson.

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Currently reading this. Best factual WW1 book I have ever picked up.

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Some might call this a hit job by the author, but it is a scary look at the military and paramilitary situation and its history.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on March 14, 2017, 12:02:47 PM
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 14, 2017, 12:08:08 PM
I can get behind this.

I really liked River of Doubt.  I read that in the midst of a few other historical non-fictions: Blood and Thunder, Empire of Summer Moon, Rebel Yell.  For some reason I kind of lump those together.  Also because it is somewhat Teddy related, Brinkley's book on Alaska is really good.

Currently reading "No Simple Highway" which is supposed to be a fresh look/perspective on the Dead.  It's alright.  Not very fresh in my opinion.

Also reading Mattheson's Shadow Country.  Dense.  Lots of characters.  Well read.  about 250 pages in and I'm kind of like "what's the point."

Have read a few Tim Keller books lately.  I think they are a good mix of digestibabily but well referenced.  Went down a CS Lewis path too (whose work Keller unapologetically models many arguments after).

A really good day.  I think the best parts were on drug policy (no surprise since it's written by a lawyer who focused a lot of her career defending drug offenders and teaching drug policy).  Somewhat interesting read.  Could be a little less me-y.



On the hopper:
Guy Clark bio
Southern Power, Southern water (talk about dense)

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on March 14, 2017, 12:09:35 PM
River of Doubt is like a factual thriller. Love that one.
I lile Bryson but sometimes he gets old and annoying and I have to stop.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on March 14, 2017, 12:15:18 PM
If any of you like non-fiction nature reads. Check out Bernd Heinrich
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on March 14, 2017, 12:24:28 PM
In nonfiction, I'm presently re-reading (for the nth time) Bruce Catton's Civil War trilogy.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: NCsporksman on March 14, 2017, 12:30:48 PM
^ it's awesome, I had 2 and had to track down the last one. Worth it

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Big J on March 14, 2017, 13:26:15 PM
I'm going on a year of reading the Tetralogy Gleim CPA Course Review.  I'm only halfway through, but I can strongly give it a non recommend. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 14, 2017, 14:02:15 PM
River of Doubt was a good read. I wish we still had presidents like Teddy.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Jfey on March 14, 2017, 14:44:18 PM
I also know how to read.  Just finished Brown Dog.  Evaluating options for my next book

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Onslow on March 14, 2017, 15:49:20 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 14, 2017, 10:43:29 AM
In honor of Beetle and his request – let's get this party started.  Plus, we might as well introduce a cool word from the book.





I'm in favor of a Geert Wilders pompadour thread.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: bmadd on March 14, 2017, 15:58:35 PM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on March 14, 2017, 12:08:08 PM
Also reading Mattheson's Shadow Country.  Dense.  Lots of characters.  Well read.  about 250 pages in and I'm kind of like "what's the point."

I'm currently trying to decide what to start next and that is sitting on my shelf. Not tempting me as much anymore.

Quote from: Jfey on March 14, 2017, 14:44:18 PM
I also know how to read.  Just finished Brown Dog.  Evaluating options for my next book

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I speak for us all in that we are very surprised, but happy you learned to read. If you liked Harrison and want another, A Good Day To Die is a good one.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 14, 2017, 16:57:50 PM
should read "well written".

I do wonder if there are so many characters it takes that long just to develop them to get into the meat. 

His book on the AIM movement in the 70s is great.  Also very dense but very through on an interesting topic (esp in light of Dakota Access stuff now).
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 14, 2017, 18:56:14 PM
Loved Brown Dog!!!


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on March 14, 2017, 19:57:27 PM
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River of Doubt and Lost City of Z were good.    Lost City of the Monkey God not so great.


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 15, 2017, 08:16:02 AM
I love Emerald Mile.  Have given that book as a present many times.

How is the stranger in the woods?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Jfey on March 15, 2017, 08:34:00 AM

[/quote]
I speak for us all in that we are very surprised, but happy you learned to read. If you liked Harrison and want another, A Good Day To Die is a good one.
[/quote]

Thanks.  It was a long road but I made it.  Prob keep riding the Harrison train.  Will check out your suggestion.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 09:08:38 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on March 15, 2017, 08:16:02 AM
I love Emerald Mile.  Have given that book as a present many times.

How is the stranger in the woods?

Stranger in the Woods was a good read but danced around a lot.   You could tell the author had to weave in historical and philosophical references to fill pages because there just wasn't much story to tell beyond 9 hours of conversation with Chris Knight (in jail).   I'd wait and find a used copy if you can.

Emerald Mile was off the hook.    Funny you mention giving books as presents.    There's a bookstore (Blue Moon) in Lovingston, VA.   Every time I go there they have copies of The River Why.   I've bought at least 6 or 7 and given them out.     Blue Moon is a gold mine if you're ever nearby and have A LOT of time on your hands.   I've found several first editions in there.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 15, 2017, 09:16:35 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on March 14, 2017, 16:57:50 PM
should read "well written".

I do wonder if there are so many characters it takes that long just to develop them to get into the meat. 

His book on the AIM movement in the 70s is great.  Also very dense but very through on an interesting topic (esp in light of Dakota Access stuff now).

In the Spirit of Crazy Horse? Yep, that's a good one that has a permenant place on my shelf, along with his Under the Mountain Wall: A Chronicle of Two Seasons in the Stone Age.

Interesting word from the latter: Horim-a gourd penis sheath worn by Papauan warriors.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 15, 2017, 09:26:12 AM
@Beetle -- So, if I get the book, is it going to be far more than the article I've included here? Or is it a bunch of mumbo jumbo? I love hermit stuff. I wish I could be a hermit..... :banana072:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/apr/12/inside-maine-hermits-lair
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 15, 2017, 09:57:49 AM
Quote from: Yallerhammer on March 15, 2017, 09:16:35 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on March 14, 2017, 16:57:50 PM
should read "well written".

I do wonder if there are so many characters it takes that long just to develop them to get into the meat. 

His book on the AIM movement in the 70s is great.  Also very dense but very through on an interesting topic (esp in light of Dakota Access stuff now).

In the Spirit of Crazy Horse? Yep, that's a good one that has a permenant place on my shelf, along with his Under the Mountain Wall: A Chronicle of Two Seasons in the Stone Age.

Interesting word from the latter: Horim-a gourd penis sheath worn by Papauan warriors.

That's the one.  I fancy myself somewhat knowledgeable about US History but had never heard of AIM much less the two FBI agents involved in the shootout (double nevermind everything else that happened). 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 11:29:26 AM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on March 15, 2017, 09:26:12 AM
@Beetle -- So, if I get the book, is it going to be far more than the article I've included here? Or is it a bunch of mumbo jumbo? I love hermit stuff. I wish I could be a hermit..... :banana072:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/apr/12/inside-maine-hermits-lair

Honestly, I think you could read this article and google the rest to get the story.    The book doesn't add much more other than anecdotal references to other hermits or related cultural/religious practices.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 15, 2017, 12:10:19 PM
Quote from: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 11:29:26 AM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on March 15, 2017, 09:26:12 AM
@Beetle -- So, if I get the book, is it going to be far more than the article I've included here? Or is it a bunch of mumbo jumbo? I love hermit stuff. I wish I could be a hermit..... :banana072:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/apr/12/inside-maine-hermits-lair

Honestly, I think you could read this article and google the rest to get the story.    The book doesn't add much more other than anecdotal references to other hermits or related cultural/religious practices.

This is what I gathered as well from just a quick search or two. Much obliged.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 15, 2017, 14:20:08 PM
The percentage of American adults who read literature — any novels, short stories, poetry or plays — fell to at least a three-decade low last year, according to a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts.

In 2015, 43 percent of adults read at least one work of literature in the previous year. That's the lowest percentage in any year since NEA surveys began tracking reading and arts participation in 1982, when the literature reading rate was 57 percent


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/09/07/the-long-steady-decline-of-literary-reading/?utm_term=.3bcab8111266
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on March 15, 2017, 14:34:41 PM
Surprisingly, this forum is trending up.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 14:50:54 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 15, 2017, 14:20:08 PM
The percentage of American adults who read literature — any novels, short stories, poetry or plays — fell to at least a three-decade low last year, according to a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts.

In 2015, 43 percent of adults read at least one work of literature in the previous year. That's the lowest percentage in any year since NEA surveys began tracking reading and arts participation in 1982, when the literature reading rate was 57 percent


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/09/07/the-long-steady-decline-of-literary-reading/?utm_term=.3bcab8111266

Not hard to correlate here.     Think MTV, ESPN, IBM PSII, etc.

Plus, non-fiction rules!




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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on March 15, 2017, 15:40:47 PM
"Plus, non-fiction rules!"

Now wait a durn minute. I like fiction as well.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 15, 2017, 17:17:20 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 15, 2017, 14:20:08 PM
The percentage of American adults who read literature — any novels, short stories, poetry or plays — fell to at least a three-decade low last year, according to a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts.

In 2015, 43 percent of adults read at least one work of literature in the previous year. That's the lowest percentage in any year since NEA surveys began tracking reading and arts participation in 1982, when the literature reading rate was 57 percent


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/09/07/the-long-steady-decline-of-literary-reading/?utm_term=.3bcab8111266

I'll be damned!  Clinton won 232 of the 538 electoral votes in November, which is 43.1%, and only 43% of adults read at least one work of literature in 2015.   So, 0.1% of Trump supporters, or 5.4 electoral arena non-readers were confused and soiled their ballot.  Now that is a parallel I can believe! 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 15, 2017, 17:23:48 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 15, 2017, 17:17:20 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 15, 2017, 14:20:08 PM
The percentage of American adults who read literature — any novels, short stories, poetry or plays — fell to at least a three-decade low last year, according to a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts.

In 2015, 43 percent of adults read at least one work of literature in the previous year. That's the lowest percentage in any year since NEA surveys began tracking reading and arts participation in 1982, when the literature reading rate was 57 percent


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/09/07/the-long-steady-decline-of-literary-reading/?utm_term=.3bcab8111266

I'll be damned!  Clinton won 232 of the 538 electoral votes in November, which is 43.1%, and only 43% of adults read at least one work of literature in 2015.  Now that is a parallel I can believe!

I disprove your demographic. I probably read a hundred books a year, and I wouldn't have voted for that conniving bitch if my life depended on it. :D
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutfanatic on March 15, 2017, 17:26:16 PM
Doug,
The blackwater book is good, but I think there is some sugar coating. Also, the story is nowhere near finished. They took a lot of shit for human rights abuses and extrajudicial killings. They went off the grid for a bit, and reemerged as "Academie."

They aren't the only dog in the fight. I'd say Wexford Group is far more interesting. They had some controversies too, but there's no book. Another PMC of interest is a company called Triple Canopy. Those books need to be written too.

Phil,
The Catton books are exceptional. I have an older one volume book that was published in the 1970's called The American Civil War by Catton. It is more of a coffee table book, with amazing photos, paintings and some of the most amazing battle maps I've ever seen. They are hand drawn in pen and ink and very detailed.

Alas, I have no time for recreational reading, because I am reading:

Ecology, the Economy of Nature by Ricklefs and Rilyea

Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy by Corey

Molecular Cell Biology by Lodish, et al.

Human Anatomy and Physiology by Mareib and Hoehm


why did I do this to myself again?  b';
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 15, 2017, 17:35:35 PM
Quote from: Yallerhammer on March 15, 2017, 17:23:48 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 15, 2017, 17:17:20 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 15, 2017, 14:20:08 PM
The percentage of American adults who read literature — any novels, short stories, poetry or plays — fell to at least a three-decade low last year, according to a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts.

In 2015, 43 percent of adults read at least one work of literature in the previous year. That's the lowest percentage in any year since NEA surveys began tracking reading and arts participation in 1982, when the literature reading rate was 57 percent


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2016/09/07/the-long-steady-decline-of-literary-reading/?utm_term=.3bcab8111266

I'll be damned!  Clinton won 232 of the 538 electoral votes in November, which is 43.1%, and only 43% of adults read at least one work of literature in 2015.  Now that is a parallel I can believe!

I disprove your demographic. I probably read a hundred books a year, and I wouldn't have voted for that conniving bitch if my life depended on it. :D

You didn't disprove shit!  I did not see your name on the list of NC Electoral College members, so you were part of the minority popular vote.  (smiley face)
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 20:07:36 PM
Some grinders....

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A classic (thanks Woolly)

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on March 15, 2017, 20:19:38 PM
Got the Stonewall book. Had an elective class under Robertson at VT. What a gem.  'c;
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 20:21:05 PM
One more.......worth the read:

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 15, 2017, 20:35:47 PM
John reminded me that I happen to have a extremely rare counterfeit copy of Harry Middleton's Starlight Creek Angling Society, which I may be willing to loan, under penalty of death, to worthy individuals. 


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 20:39:45 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 15, 2017, 20:35:47 PM
John reminded me that I happen to have a extremely rare counterfeit copy of Harry Middleton's Starlight Creek Angling Society, which I may be willing to loan, under penalty of death, to worthy individuals. 


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I scored a copy of that from this seedy guy hanging out in a coffee shop.......hmmmm


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 15, 2017, 20:41:43 PM
My next read. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on March 16, 2017, 06:42:35 AM
I gotta do something about my bookshelves. This is just one of them --

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 16, 2017, 07:27:36 AM
Read this one recently, it was quite interesting. It's about the building of the railroad up the Swannanoa grade from Old Fort to Black Mountain in the late 1800s-the stretch of rail that finally linked western NC to the rest of the world. Over a hundred people died building the tracks for that short distance that takes about ten minutes to drive on I-40 now.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 16, 2017, 14:20:53 PM
I'm a big fan of fiction/literature too.  Go through phases and am currently in nonfiction but might pivot back and finish shadow country.

If you're really feeling deep, maaaaan, check out the My Struggle series.  The first three are by far my favorite and first one if I had to pick one.

Harry Middleton is amazing.  Damn he has a way of describing depression like few people can.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 16, 2017, 17:47:16 PM
I liked ol' Harry. He was a hell of a writer, even if he was prone to considerable embellishment. I have a couple of his books on my shelf.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Aka on April 27, 2017, 22:51:05 PM
Currently reading the second book in the boarder trilogy. Well written prose and good story telling. Before this I had read some of the last Harrison that I hadn't read before and re-read a few of my favorites of his.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: tomato can on April 28, 2017, 05:37:11 AM
Anything by McCarthy is superlative.  My favorite is the Orchard Keeper and if you want to laugh out loud like a hyena check out his book "Suttree". 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: NCsporksman on April 28, 2017, 05:37:27 AM
I had this on my phone one night during a weekend turkey hunt...usually dont get too jazzed about historical fiction but really couldn't put it down...1000X better than the godawful comicbook movievisitors can't see pics , please register or login


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: billythreetimes on April 28, 2017, 07:10:59 AM
Quote from: tomato can on April 28, 2017, 05:37:11 AM
Anything by McCarthy is superlative.  My favorite is the Orchard Keeper and if you want to laugh out loud like a hyena check out his book "Suttree".

Glad to see this. I've been wanting to get into McCarthy, but always get tied up in something else.

Currently finishing up Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life by William Finnegan and re-reading Dharma Bums while in search of some sort of inspiration.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on April 28, 2017, 08:14:09 AM
Suttree deserves to be up there with the best of steinbeck (east of eden, imo), hemingway, or whomever else you consider to be the GOAT.  It's a masterpiece.  Have you read some of McCarthy's other southern works?  Child of God?  Eye god.  If you like the southern McCarthy books I'd suggest William Gay.  Some are dark as fuck but most are awesome.  Ray McKinnon made one of his works into an awesome movie (That Evening Sun).

I'm currently reading ... too many.

Boys of Brooklyn - it being baseball season I figured I'd give this a whirl.  I think I'm quitting it.  I don't need some pussy from Brooklyn telling me how broken the south was in the 50s.  I came for baseball.  Not his analysis on how ignorant my relatives were.

Still working on Shadow Country.  That's a damn book.  I like it just have to take breaks.

Going on vaca soon so I got some vaca reads.  Harrison's new food book and "The Tower" which I scoped out at the local pataguicci store.  Seems very first world problem-y but hell it's vacation.

Just bought "a little life" on a friend rec.  He said it was incredible. 

Muddy, have you ever read The Varieties of Religious Experience?  It may be on the wrong side of the pulpit for you (I'm not sure which side the book is on) but it seems interesting.  Just bought it.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on April 28, 2017, 08:21:06 AM
Quote from: billythreetimes on April 28, 2017, 07:10:59 AM
Quote from: tomato can on April 28, 2017, 05:37:11 AM
Anything by McCarthy is superlative.  My favorite is the Orchard Keeper and if you want to laugh out loud like a hyena check out his book "Suttree".

Glad to see this. I've been wanting to get into McCarthy, but always get tied up in something else.

Currently finishing up Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life by William Finnegan and re-reading Dharma Bums while in search of some sort of inspiration.

Dharma Bums is Kerouac for high school freshmen.  Give Desolation Angels a spin if you're man enough. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: billythreetimes on April 28, 2017, 08:57:16 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on April 28, 2017, 08:21:06 AM
Quote from: billythreetimes on April 28, 2017, 07:10:59 AM
Quote from: tomato can on April 28, 2017, 05:37:11 AM
Anything by McCarthy is superlative.  My favorite is the Orchard Keeper and if you want to laugh out loud like a hyena check out his book "Suttree".

Glad to see this. I've been wanting to get into McCarthy, but always get tied up in something else.

Currently finishing up Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life by William Finnegan and re-reading Dharma Bums while in search of some sort of inspiration.

Dharma Bums is Kerouac for high school freshmen.  Give Desolation Angels a spin if you're man enough.

Will. Interested in The Tower, let me know how that one is.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: tomato can on April 28, 2017, 18:35:44 PM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on April 28, 2017, 08:14:09 AM
Suttree deserves to be up there with the best of steinbeck (east of eden, imo), hemingway, or whomever else you consider to be the GOAT.  It's a masterpiece.  Have you read some of McCarthy's other southern works?  Child of God?  Eye god.  .
.

Yes of course, read all of 'em many times.  Lester Ballard is truly a Child of God.  If you liked Suttree then check out Flannery O'Connor's Wise Blood.  amazing stuff  very funny stuff in that book too,  but then again its Flannery O'Conner.  Eudora Wealty is another amazing author also.  Tobacco Road by Erskine Caldwell is another good one.  It will curdle your milk. The turnip eating scene in Tobacco Road is as funny as the city mouse defiling watermelons in Suttree.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on May 01, 2017, 09:07:43 AM
I've read Tobacco Road and and some welty and o'connor (with whom I share a birth city) but need to revisit all.  I actually got a pretty interesting non-fiction highlighting o'connor - "flannery o'connor and the christ haunted south".  One day when I retire I'll get around to reading all the books I have.   
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on May 04, 2017, 10:02:26 AM
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on May 04, 2017, 10:22:57 AM
http://bittersoutherner.com/digging-in-the-trash-david-joy
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on May 04, 2017, 10:37:58 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on May 04, 2017, 10:22:57 AM
http://bittersoutherner.com/digging-in-the-trash-david-joy

Great essay. Thanks for putting up the link.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on May 04, 2017, 10:39:10 AM
I think I'm going to go buy his book during lunch. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: bmadd on May 04, 2017, 10:46:54 AM
Thanks for that link SJW. I've seen David Joy highly recommended by a favorite author of mine but I've never read any of his writing. I, like you, will be making a purchase soon.

He sounds like he's from a place a lot like where I'm from.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: JMiller on May 04, 2017, 11:02:51 AM
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 05, 2017, 13:45:13 PM
I'll just put this here

https://www.facebook.com/teresa.moore.4625/posts/1538222079562994


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: tomato can on May 05, 2017, 14:11:18 PM
For the Jarheads in the family, Matterhorn was a page turner.  They had enlisted dialogue down pat. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: billythreetimes on May 08, 2017, 08:02:24 AM
Looking for something different for an upcoming trip. I'm in between The Big Sky by Guthrie and Blood Meridian by McCarthy. Anybody have any thoughts on either?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on May 12, 2017, 05:01:06 AM
Can't go wrong. Have you ever read east of eden?  Slightly different but a worthy endeavor (major understatement).
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: billythreetimes on May 12, 2017, 10:34:27 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on May 12, 2017, 05:01:06 AM
Can't go wrong. Have you ever read east of eden?  Slightly different but a worthy endeavor (major understatement).

I haven't but I'll take your word for it.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: NCsporksman on May 12, 2017, 10:49:15 AM
East of Eden great book...pretty sure Oprah agreed as well

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on May 12, 2017, 11:39:53 AM
It's one of the best books ever (imo) oprah's endorsement notwithstanding.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: billythreetimes on May 12, 2017, 15:07:27 PM
Well, I went in for Big Sky and left with Suttree.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: tomato can on May 12, 2017, 17:17:53 PM
suttree can be funny as hell.

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on May 15, 2017, 08:49:51 AM
Suttree is a great choice. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 15, 2017, 15:26:16 PM
I just started listening to Jon Krakaure's Where Men Win Glory. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/030738604X?ie=UTF8)

Wasn't sure if I was going to like it but it's very interesting and I was hooked after the introduction.


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on June 01, 2017, 12:28:54 PM
This week's books read:  Marcus Luttrell's Lone Survivor, Timothy Egan's The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, and Tony Hillerman's A Thief of Time.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on July 02, 2017, 19:22:09 PM
Finished my WWI book.
Went a little lighter with a 1946 edition that was gifted to me. Cheers.visitors can't see pics , please register or login
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on July 02, 2017, 19:29:52 PM
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Some light holiday reading


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on July 02, 2017, 20:05:33 PM
I've read that and a couple other Jared Diamond books. I liked them. But I find cultural anthropology very fascinating.  So may not.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on July 05, 2017, 09:34:31 AM
Quote from: Beetle on July 02, 2017, 19:29:52 PM
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Some light holiday reading


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Excellent read. 1491 is another good one.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Lithwan on July 05, 2017, 16:13:29 PM
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sapiens-Humankind-Yuval-Noah-Harari/dp/1846558239

This is another good account of history from a multidisciplinary viewpoint, much like Guns, Germs and Steel.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 14, 2017, 10:12:24 AM
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Good mail day!


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on July 14, 2017, 10:39:47 AM
How's the book? 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on July 14, 2017, 12:26:51 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on July 14, 2017, 10:12:24 AM
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Good mail day!


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That's awesome.  Just finished that one yesterday. It's like other JG books. Just different stories.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on July 14, 2017, 13:13:35 PM
Yep- typical JG but I really enjoyed it.    Worth the read!
Title: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: The Dude on July 16, 2017, 18:31:30 PM
Any of y'all ever read Dump Truck by C. Bigsby?


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 16, 2017, 19:06:02 PM
Quote from: The Dude on July 16, 2017, 18:31:30 PM
Any of y'all ever read Dump Truck by C. Bigsby?


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Nope, I don't have a problem with non-Caucasians.  Plus the book is a bit too Southern redneck for me.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on July 17, 2017, 09:19:05 AM
Muddie have you read hillbilly elegy? 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 17, 2017, 19:58:53 PM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on July 17, 2017, 09:19:05 AM
Muddie have you read hillbilly elegy?

No, I have not.  Should I?  I'll check it out.  Many thanks.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on July 18, 2017, 08:38:55 AM
I haven't read it but it's gotten a lot of buzz.  Applachia boy who made it big writes with perspective from both sides of good fortune.  Or something like that.  I tend to shy away from books that become "popular" for the most part because I generally think most people are morons but I am curious about this one.  A muddie stamp of approval would go a long way. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on July 18, 2017, 08:46:55 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on July 17, 2017, 09:19:05 AM
Muddie have you read hillbilly elegy?
Next on my list. Wife liked it. Is that a no vote?

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 18, 2017, 11:30:57 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on July 18, 2017, 08:38:55 AM
I haven't read it but it's gotten a lot of buzz.  Applachia boy who made it big writes with perspective from both sides of good fortune.  Or something like that.  I tend to shy away from books that become "popular" for the most part because I generally think most people are morons but I am curious about this one.  A muddie stamp of approval would go a long way.

I think the conservatives really like it, so that is strike 1.  Doug's wife, whom I've never met, liked it, and she married Doug, which begs the question, is she sane?  If she's visually impaired and relies on braille, then I might entertain her analysis of Hillbilly Elegy, and her fondness of an invisible or blurred Doug.  That might be strike 2, but I am going to give it a gander. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Big J on July 18, 2017, 11:57:40 AM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 18, 2017, 11:30:57 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on July 18, 2017, 08:38:55 AM
I haven't read it but it's gotten a lot of buzz.  Applachia boy who made it big writes with perspective from both sides of good fortune.  Or something like that.  I tend to shy away from books that become "popular" for the most part because I generally think most people are morons but I am curious about this one.  A muddie stamp of approval would go a long way.

I think the conservatives really like it, so that is strike 1.  Doug's wife, whom I've never met, liked it, and she married Doug, which begs the question, is she sane?  If she's visually impaired and relies on braille, then I might entertain her analysis of Hillbilly Elegy, and her fondness of an invisible or blurred Doug.  That might be strike 2, but I am going to give it a gander.

Author graduated from OSU. Strike 3
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 18, 2017, 13:58:20 PM
Not that any of you are interested but I've been working on a book for the last few years.  I am not an author/writer, and never will be.  My goal is to leave the tales and interpretations for my son and any grandkids that may appear.  Plus I've found that attempting to define/explain yourself, your life, etc. is very much boosted by struggling to put it in written word.

The working title is "Meet Me at the Grove", with everything from chapters on informative youth in VA mountains, to VT's positive influence, to skepticism, to hunting and fishing, to my late father, to religion and politics, to sagas of old-timers sprinkling baby powder on a young girl's cucci and licking it off all before my teenage eyes, etc.  There may be reasons that I am screwed up, likely there are many explanations.

If my membership to life does not expire, I'll finish it.   
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: rbphoto on July 18, 2017, 13:59:22 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 18, 2017, 11:30:57 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on July 18, 2017, 08:38:55 AM
I haven't read it but it's gotten a lot of buzz.  Applachia boy who made it big writes with perspective from both sides of good fortune.  Or something like that.  I tend to shy away from books that become "popular" for the most part because I generally think most people are morons but I am curious about this one.  A muddie stamp of approval would go a long way.

I think the conservatives really like it, so that is strike 1.  Doug's wife, whom I've never met, liked it, and she married Doug, which begs the question, is she sane?  If she's visually impaired and relies on braille, then I might entertain her analysis of Hillbilly Elegy, and her fondness of an invisible or blurred Doug.  That might be strike 2, but I am going to give it a gander.

I've met @Dougfish 's wife and she is wonderful.  She let's him fish, drink beer and spend time with the likes of all of us here.

Strike 1 for @Mudwall Gatewood 3.0
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutfanatic on July 18, 2017, 19:21:48 PM
I am reading.

Lange: Current Diagnosis and Treatment, Rheumatology by Imboden, Hellman and Stone.

[attachment id=0 msg=153222]

It's a real thriller.  b';
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on July 19, 2017, 11:26:54 AM
Quote from: rbphoto on July 18, 2017, 13:59:22 PM

I've met @Dougfish 's wife and she is wonderful.  She let's him fish, drink beer and spend time with the likes of all of us here.

Strike 1 for @Mudwall Gatewood 3.0

Yeah, I do have a pretty sweet gig.  -0-

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on July 20, 2017, 20:11:57 PM
Oddly enough, I walk into one of our restrooms at home, and sure as hell, right there on the back of the toilet lies a copy of "Hillbilly Elegy." The wife picked it up. Interesting.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on July 21, 2017, 08:21:06 AM
We should have a book club!
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on July 21, 2017, 08:47:23 AM
I've sort of overextended my reading as of lately. Three books going at once.

I'm struggling to finish John Galligan's fourth and last installment of his fly-fishing mystery series.

I'm trying to find time to make meaningful headway further into Millard's "The River of Doubt."

I'm also reading intermittently, "The Passing of the Night" by Robinson Risner.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on July 23, 2017, 15:23:10 PM
John G on the way, also.visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutfanatic on October 28, 2017, 20:09:12 PM
Mudwall,

I have a read for you. It will be the delight of your next theology debate with J.

I had the misfortune of having to read it for a Psychology class, and then understand it.

The Book: The Art of Loving, the author Erich Fromm. Skip most of the book. Go straight to chapter on Fromm's concept of loving God. I think you'll dig it.

Post modern secularists won't appreciate it as much, but it was written in 1956.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on October 30, 2017, 09:19:09 AM
Quote from: troutfanatic on October 28, 2017, 20:09:12 PM
Mudwall,

I have a read for you. It will be the delight of your next theology debate with J.

I had the misfortune of having to read it for a Psychology class, and then understand it.

The Book: The Art of Loving, the author Erich Fromm. Skip most of the book. Go straight to chapter on Fromm's concept of loving God. I think you'll dig it.

Post modern secularists won't appreciate it as much, but it was written in 1956.

anywhere to read that particular chapter online?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on October 31, 2017, 11:54:32 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on October 30, 2017, 09:19:09 AM
Quote from: troutfanatic on October 28, 2017, 20:09:12 PM
Mudwall,

I have a read for you. It will be the delight of your next theology debate with J.

I had the misfortune of having to read it for a Psychology class, and then understand it.

The Book: The Art of Loving, the author Erich Fromm. Skip most of the book. Go straight to chapter on Fromm's concept of loving God. I think you'll dig it.

Post modern secularists won't appreciate it as much, but it was written in 1956.

anywhere to read that particular chapter online?

https://archive.org/stream/TheArtOfLoving/43799393-The-Art-of-Loving-Erich-Fromm_djvu.txt

I have not had the opportunity to read it.  Happy reading, and give us your opinion.  Many thanks. 

I can't debate J unless he also reads it, and I ain't sure a Liberty grad can comprehend any text other than the 'good book'.    Praise Gaia!!!
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Big J on October 31, 2017, 12:39:04 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on October 31, 2017, 11:54:32 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on October 30, 2017, 09:19:09 AM
Quote from: troutfanatic on October 28, 2017, 20:09:12 PM
Mudwall,

I have a read for you. It will be the delight of your next theology debate with J.

I had the misfortune of having to read it for a Psychology class, and then understand it.

The Book: The Art of Loving, the author Erich Fromm. Skip most of the book. Go straight to chapter on Fromm's concept of loving God. I think you'll dig it.

Post modern secularists won't appreciate it as much, but it was written in 1956.

anywhere to read that particular chapter online?

https://archive.org/stream/TheArtOfLoving/43799393-The-Art-of-Loving-Erich-Fromm_djvu.txt

I have not had the opportunity to read it.  Happy reading, and give us your opinion.  Many thanks. 

I can't debate J unless he also reads it, and I ain't sure a Liberty grad can comprehend any text other than the 'good book'.    Praise Gaia!!!

I probably don't need to read it to counter the points in that book. 

http://youtu.be/K5G1FmU-ldg

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Native Fisher on October 31, 2017, 13:26:17 PM
J,

The BEST youtube version of that song.

http://youtu.be/vc-PJPrueXY (http://youtu.be/vc-PJPrueXY)
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on November 01, 2017, 09:12:12 AM
QuotefiLbve of God

It has been stated above that the basis for our need to love
lies in the experience of separateness and the resulting need
pQ overcome the anxiety of separateness by the experience of
anion. The religious form of love, that which is called the
Rove of God, is, psychologically speaking, not different. It
Bprings from the need to overcome separateness and to
Iftchieve union. In fact, the love of God has as many different
feualities and aspects as the love of man has — and to a large
f{ Extent we find the same differences.

In all theistic religions, whether they are polytheistic or
pinonotheistic, God stands for the highest value, the most de-
ll, sirable good. Hence, the specific meaning of God depends on
fcwhat is the most desirable good for a person. The under-
standing of the concept of God must, therefore, start with an
;kftalysis of the character structure of the person who wor-
ships God.

|f 15 Meister Eckhart, translated by R, B. Blakney, Harper & Brothers,
New York, 1941, p. 204.



64 THE ART OF LOVING

The development of the human race as far as we have
any knowledge of it can be characterized as the emergence
of man from nature, from mother, from the bonds of blood
and soil. In the beginning of human history man, though
thrown out of the original unity with nature, still clings to
these primary bonds. He finds his security by going back, or
holding on to these primary bonds. He still feels identified
with the world of animals and trees, and tries to find unity
by remaining one with the natural world. Many primitive
religions bear witness to this stage of development. An animal
is transformed into a totem; one wears animal masks in the
most solemn religious acts, or in war; one worships an animal
as God. At a later stage of development, when human skill
has developed to the point of artisan and arti$tic skill, when
man is not dependent any more exclusively on the gifts of
nature — the fruit he finds and the animal he kills — man
transforms the product of his own hand into a god. This is
the stage of the worship of idols made of clay, silver or gold.
Man projects his own powers and skills into the things he
makes, and thus in an alienated fashion worships his prowess,
his possessions. At a still later stage man gives his gods the
form of human beings. It seems that this can happen only
when he has become still more aware of himself, and when
he has discovered man as the highest and most dignified
"thing" in the world. In this phase of anthropomorphic god
worship we find a development in two dimensions. The one
refers to the female or male nature of the gods, the other to
the degree of maturity which man has achieved, and which
determines the nature of his gods and the nature of his love
of them.



THE THEORY OF LOVE 65

Let us first speak of the development from mother-centered
to father-centered religions. According to the great and de-
cisive discoveries of Bachofen and Morgan in the middle of
the nineteenth century, and in spite of the rejection their
findings have found in most academic circles, there can be
little doubt that there was a matriarchal phase of religion
preceding the patriarchal one, at least in many cultures. In
the matriarchal phase, the highest being is the mother. She is
the goddess, she is also the authority in family and society.
In order to understand the essence of matriarchal religion,
we have only to remember what has been said about the
essence of motherly love. Mother's love is unconditional, it
is all-protective, all-enveloping; because it is unconditional
it can also not be controlled or acquired. Its presence gives
the loved person a sense of bliss ; its absence produces a sense
of lostness and utter despair. Since mother loves her children
because they are her children, and not because they are
"good," obedient, or fulfill her wishes and commands,
[' mother's love is based on equality. All men are equal, be-
cause they all are children of a mother, because they all are
children of Mother Earth.

The next stage of human evolution, the only one of which
we have thorough knowledge and do not need to rely on in-
ferences and reconstruction, is the patriarchal phase. In this
phase the mother is dethroned from her supreme position,
and the father becomes the Supreme Being, in religion as
well as in society. The nature of fatherly love is that he makes
demands, establishes principles and laws, and that his love
for the son depends on the obedience of the latter to these
demands. He likes best the son who is most like him, who is



66 THE ART OF LOVING

most obedient and who is best fitted to become his successor,
as the inheritor of his possessions. (The development of
patriarchal society goes together with the development of
private property.) As a consequence, patriarchal society is
hierarchical; the equality of the brothers gives way to com-
petition and mutual strife. Whether we think of the Indian,
Egyptian or Greek cultures, or of the Jewish- Christian, or
Islamic religions, we are in the middle of a patriarchal world,
with its male gods, over whom one chief god reigns, or where
all gods have been eliminated with the exception of the One,
the God. However, since the wish for mother's love cannot
be eradicated from the hearts of man, it is not surprising
that the figure of the loving mother could never be fully
driven out from the pantheon. In the Jewish religion, the
mother aspects of God are reintroduced especially in the
various currents of mysticism. In the Catholic religion,
Mother is symbolized by the Church, and by the Virgin.
Even in Protestantism, the figure of Mother has not been
entirely eradicated, although she remains hidden. Luther es-
tablished as his main principle that nothing that man does
can procure God's love. God's love is Grace, the religious
attitude is to have faith in this grace, and to make oneself
small and helpless; no good works can influence God — or
make God love us, as Catholic doctrines postulated. We can
recognize here that the Catholic doctrine of good works is
part of the patriarchal picture ; I can procure father's love by
obedience and by fulfilling his demands. The Lutheran doc-
trine, on the other hand, in spite of its manifest patriarchal
character carries within it a hidden matriarchal element.
Mother's love cannot be acquired; it is there, or it is not



THE THEORY OF LOVE 67

there; all I can do is to have faith (as the Psalmist says,
"Thou hadst let me have faith into my mother's breasts. 3 ' ie )
and to transform myself into the helpless, powerless child.
But it is the peculiarity of Luther's faith that the figure of
the mother has been eliminated from the manifest picture,
and replaced by that of the father; instead of the certainty
] of being loved by mother, intense doubt, hoping against
hope for unconditional love by father, has become the para-
mount feature.

I had to discuss this difference between the matriarchal
and the patriarchal elements in religion in order to show that
the character of the love of God depends on the respective
weight of the matriarchal and the patriarchal aspects of re-
ligion. The patriarchal aspect makes me love God like a
father; I assume he is just and strict, that he punishes and
rewards; and eventually that he will elect me as his favorite
son; as God elected Abraham-Israel, as Isaac elected Jacob,
as God elects his favorite nation. In the matriarchal aspect
of religion, I love God as an all-embracing mother. I have
faith in her love, that no matter whether I am poor and
powerless, no matter whether I have sinned, she will love
me, she will not prefer any other of her children to me;
whatever happens to me, she will rescue me, will save me,
will forgive me. Needless to say, my love for God and God's
love for me cannot be separated. If God is a father, he loves
me like a son and I love him like a father. If God is mother,
her and my love are determined by this fact.
I This difference between the motherly and the fatherly
\ aspects of the love of God is, however, only one factor in

■ 16 Psalm 22:9.



68 THE ART OF LOVING

determining the nature of this love; the other factor is the
degree of maturity reached by the individual, hence in his
concept of God and in his love for God.

Since the evolution of the human race shifted from a
mother-centered to a father-centered structure of society, as
well as of religion, we can trace the development of a matur-
ing love mainly in the development of patriarchal religion. 17
In the beginning of this development we find a despotic,
jealous God, who considers man, whom he created, as his
property, and is entitled to do with him whatever he pleases.
This is the phase of religion in which God drives man out of
paradise, lest he eat from the tree of knowledge and thus
could become God himself; this is the phase in which God
decides to destroy the human race by the flood, because none
of them pleases him, with the exception of the favorite son,
Noah; this is the phase in which God demands from Abra-
ham that he kill his only, his beloved son, Isaac, to prove
his love for God by the act of ultimate obedience. But
simultaneously a new phase begins; God makes a covenant
with Noah, in which he promises never to destroy the human
race again, a covenant by which he is bound himself. Not
only is he bound by his promises, he is also bound by his
own principle, that of justice, and on this basis God must
yield to Abraham's demand to spare Sodom if there are at
least ten just men. But the development goes further than
transforming God from the figure of a despotic tribal chief

17 This holds true especially for the monotheistic religions of the
West. In Indian religions the mother figures retained a good deal of
influence, for instance in the Goddess Kali; in Buddhism and Taoism
the concept of a God — or a Goddess — was without essential signif-
icance, if not altogether eliminated.



THE THEORY OF LOVE 69

into a loving father, into a father who himself is bound by
the principles which he has postulated; it goes in the direc-
tion of transforming God from the figure of a father into a
symbol of his principles, those of justice, truth and love.
God is truth, God is justice. In this development God ceases
to be a person, a man, a father; he becomes the symbol of
the principle of unity behind the manifoldness of phenomena,
of the vision of the flower which will grow from the spir-
itual seed within man. God cannot have a name. A name
always denotes a thing, or a person, something finite. How
can God have a name, if he is not a person, not a thing?

The most striking incident of this change lies in the Bib-
lical story of God's revelation to Moses. When Moses tells
him that the Hebrews will not believe that God has sent
him, unless he can tell them God's name (how could idol
worshipers comprehend a nameless God, since the very
essence of an idol is to have a name?), God makes a con-
cession. He tells Moses that his name is "I am becoming
that which I am becoming." "I-am-becoming is my name."
The "I-am-becoming" means that God is not finite, not a
person, not a "being." The most adequate translation of the
sentence would be: tell them that "my name is nameless."
The prohibition to make any image of God, to pronounce
his name in vain, eventually to pronounce his name at all,
aims at the same goal, that of freeing man from the idea that
God is a father, that he is a person. Iri the subsequent theo-
logical development, the idea is carried further in the prin-
ciple that one must not even give God any positive attribute.
To say of God that he is wise, strong, good implies again
that he is a person; the most I can do is to say what God is



70 THE ART OF LOVING

not, to state negative attributes, to postulate that he is not
limited, not unkind, not unjust. The more I know what God
is not, the more knowledge I have of God. 18

Following the maturing idea of monotheism in its further
consequences can lead only to one conclusion: not to men-
tion God's name at all, not to speak about God. Then God
becomes what he potentially is in monotheistic theology,
the nameless One, an inexpressible stammer, referring to the
unity underlying the phenomenal universe, the ground of all
existence; God becomes truth, love, justice. God is I, inas-
much as I am human.

Quite evidently this evolution from the anthropomorphic
to the pure monotheistic principle makes all the difference to
the nature of the love of God. The God of Abraham can be
loved, or feared, as a father, sometimes his forgiveness, some-
times his anger being the dominant aspect. Inasmuch as God
is the father, I am the child. I have not emerged fully from
the autistic wish for omniscience and omnipotence. I have
not yet acquired the objectivity to realize my limitations as
a human being, my ignorance, my helplessness. I still claim,
like a child, that there must be a father who rescues me,
who watches me, who punishes me, a father who likes me
when I am obedient, who is flattered by my praise and
angry because of my disobedience. Quite obviously, the
majority of people have, in their personal development, not
overcome this infantile stage, and hence the belief in God to
most people is the belief in a helping father — a childish illu-
sion. In spite of the fact that this concept of religion has
been overcome by some of the great teachers of the human

18 Cf. Maimonides' concept of the negative attributes in The Guide
for the Perplexed.



THE THEORY OF LOVE 7 1

race, and by a minority of men, it is still the dominant form
bi religion.

Inasmuch as this is so, the criticism of the idea of God, as
it was expressed by Freud, is quite correct. The error, how-
ever, was in the fact that he ignored the other aspect of
; monotheistic religion, and its true kernel, the logic of which
leads exactly to the negation of this concept of God. The
truly religious person, if he follows the essence of the mono-
theistic idea, does not pray for anything, does not expect
anything from God; he does not love God as a child loves
his father or his mother; he has acquired the humility of
sensing his limitations, to the degree of knowing that he
knows nothing about God. God becomes to him a symbol in
which man, at an earlier stage of his evolution, has expressed
the totality of that which man is striving for, the realm of
the spiritual world, of love, truth and justice. He has faith
in the principles which "God" represents; he thinks truth,
lives love and justice, and considers all of his life only valu-
able inasmuch as it gives him the chance to arrive at an ever
fuller unfolding of his human powers — as the only reality
that matters, as the only object of "ultimate concern"; and,
| eventually, he does not speak about God — nor even mention
his name, To love God, if he were going to use this word,
would mean, then, to long for the attainment of the full
capacity to love, for the realization of that which "God"
stands for in oneself.

From this point of view, the logical consequence of
monotheistic thought is the negation of all "theo-logy," of
all "knowledge about God." Yet, there remains a difference
between such a radical non-theological view and a non-



72 THE ART OF LOVING

theistic system, as we find it, for instance in early Buddhism
or in Taoism.

In all theistic systems, even a non-theological, mystical
one, there is the assumption of the reality of the spiritual
realm, as one transcending man, giving meaning and validity
to man's spiritual powers and his striving for salvation and
inner birth. In a non-theistic system, there exists no spiritual
realm outside of man or transcending him. The realm of
love, reason and justice exists as a reality only because, and
inasmuch as, man has been able to develop these powers in
himself throughout the process of his evolution. In this view
there is no meaning to life, except the meaning man himself
gives to it; man is utterly alone except inasmuch as he helps
another.

Having spoken of the love of God, I want to make it clear
that I myself do not think in terms of a theistic concept, and
that to me the concept of God is only a historically condi-
tioned one, in which man has expressed his experience of his
higher powers, his longing for truth and for unity at a given
historical period. But I believe also that the consequences of
strict monotheism and a non-theistic ultimate concern with
the spiritual reality are two views which, though different,
need not fight each other.

At this point, however, another dimension of the problem
of the love of God arises, which must be discussed in order
to fathom the complexity of the problem. I refer to a funda-
mental difference in the religious attitude between the East
(China and India) and the West; this difference can be ex-
pressed in terms of logical concepts. Since Aristotle, the
Western world has followed the logical principles of Aris-



THE THEORY OF LOVE 73

totelian philosophy. This logic is based on the law of identity
which states that A is A, the law of contradiction (A is not
non-A) and the law of the excluded middle (A cannot be
A and non-A, neither A nor non-A). Aristotle explains
his position very clearly in the following sentence: "It is im-
possible for the same thing at the same time to belong and
not to belong to the same thing and in the same respect; and
whatever other distinctions we might add to meet dialectical
objections, let them be added. This, then, is the most certain
of all principles. . . ." 19

This axiom of Aristotelian logic has so deeply imbued our
habits of thought that it is felt to be "natural" and self-
evident, while on the other hand the statement that X is A
and not A seems to be nonsensical. (Of course, the statement
refers to the subject X at a given time, not to X now and X
later, or one aspect of X as against another aspect.)

In opposition to Aristotelian logic is what one might call
paradoxical logic, which assumes that A and non-A do not
exclude each other as predicates of X. Paradoxical logic was
predominant in Chinese and Indian thinking, in the phi-
losophy of Heraclitus, and then again, under the name of
dialectics, it became the philosophy of Hegel, and of Marx.
The general principle of paradoxical logic has been clearly
described by Lao-tse. "Words that are strictly true seem to be
paradoxical" 20 And by Chuang-tzu : "That which is one is

19 Aristotle, Metaphysics, Book Gamma, 1005b. 20. Quoted from
Aristotle* s Metaphysics, newly translated by Richard Hope, Columbia
University Press, New York, 1952.

20 Lao-tse, The Tdo Teh King, The Sacred Books of the East, ed.
by F. Max Mueller, Vol. XXXIX, Oxford University Press, London,
1927, p. 120.



74 THE ART OF LOVING

one. That which. is not-one, is also one." These formulations
of paradoxical logic are positive : it is and it is not. Another
formulation is negative: it is neither this nor that. The
former expression of thought we find in Taoistic thought, in
Heraclitus and again in Hegelian dialectics; the latter formu-
lation is frequent in Indian philosophy.

Although it would transcend the scope of this book to give
a more detailed description of the difference between Aris-
totelian and paradoxical logic, I shall mention a few illustra-
tions in order to make the principle more understandable.
Paradoxical logic in Western thought has its earliest philo-
sophical expression in Heraclitus 9 philosophy. He assumes
the conflict between opposites is the basis of all existence.
"They do not understand," he says, "that the all-One, con-
flicting in itself, is identical with itself: conflicting harmony
as in the bow and in the lyre." 21 Or still more clearly: "We
go into the same river, and yet not in the same; it is we and
it is not we" 22 Or "One and the same manifests itself in
things as living and dead, waking and sleeping, young and
old." 23

In Lao-tse's philosophy the same idea is expressed in a
more poetic form. A characteristic example of Taoist para-
doxical thinking is the following statement : "Gravity is the
root of lightness; stillness the ruler of movement." 24 Or "The
Tao in its regular course does nothing and so there is noth-

21 W. Capelle, Die Vorsokratiker, Alfred Kroener Verlag, Stuttgart,
1953, p. 134. (My translation. E. F.)

22 Ibid., p. 132.
™ Ibid., p. 133.

24 Mueller, op. cit., p. 69.



THE THEORY OF LOVE 75

ing which he does not do." 25 Or "My words are very easy
to know, and very easy to practice; but there is no one in
the world who is able to know and able to practice them.' 3 26
In Taoist thinking, just as in Indian and Socratic thinking,
the highest step to which thought can lead is to know that
we do not know. "To know and yet [think] we do not know
is the highest [attainment] ; not to know [and yet think] we
do know is a disease. 35 27 It is only a consequence of this
philosophy that the highest God cannot be named. The ulti-
mate reality, the ultimate One cannot be caught in words
or in thoughts. As Lao-tse puts it, "The Tao that can be
trodden is not the enduring and unchanging Tao. The name
that can be named is not the enduring and unchanging
name. 33 28 Or, in a different formulation, "We look at it, and
we do not see it, and we name it the 'Equable. 3 We listen to
it, and we do not hear it, and we name it the 'Inaudible.'
We try to grasp it, and do not get hold of it, and we name
it 'the Subtle. 5 With these three qualities, it can not be made
the subject of description ; and hence we blend them together
and obtain The One. 33 29 And still another formulation of
the same idea: "He who knows [the Tao] does not [care
to] speak [about it] ; he who is [however ready to] speak
about it does not know it. 33 30

Brahmanic philosophy was concerned with the relation-
ship between manifoldness ( of phenomena ) and unity

25 Ibid., p. 79.

26 ibid., p. 112.

27 ibid., p. 113.

28 Ibid., p. 47.

29 Ibid., p. 57.
so Ibid., p. 100.



76 THE ART OF LOVING

(Brahman). But paradoxical philosophy is neither in India
nor in China to be confused with a dualistic standpoint. The
harmony (unity) consists in the conflicting position from
which it is made up. "Brahmanical thinking was centered
from the beginning around the paradox of the simultaneous
antagonisms — yet — identity of the manifest forces and forms
of the phenomenal world. . . ." 31 The ultimate power in
the Universe as well as in man transcends both the con-
ceptual and the sensual sphere. It is therefore "neither this
nor thus." But, as Zimmer remarks, "there is no antagonism
between c real and unreal' in this strictly non-dualistic realiza-
tion." 32 In their search for unity behind manifoldness, the
Brahman thinkers came to the conclusion that the perceived
pair of opposites reflects the nature not of things but of the
perceiving mind. The perceiving thought must transcend
itself if it is to attain true reality. Opposition is a category
of man's mind, not in itself an element of reality. In the
Rig- Veda the principle is expressed in this form: "I am the
two, the life force and the life material, the two at once."
The ultimate consequence of the idea that thought can only
perceive in contradictions has found an even more drastic
sequence in Vedantic thinking, which postulates that thought
— with all its fine distinction — was "only a more subtle hori-
zon of ignorance, in fact the most subtle of all the deluding
devices of maya." 33

Paradoxical logic has a significant bearing on the concept

31 H. R. Zimmer, Philosophies of India, Pantheon Books, New York,
195L

3 2 Ibid,

33 Ibid., p. 424.



THE THEORY OF LOVE 77

; of God. Inasmuch as God represents the ultimate reality,

and inasmuch as the human mind perceives reality in con-

| tradictions, no positive statement can be made of God. In

; the Vedantas the idea of an omniscient and omnipotent God

!'■ is considered the ultimate form of ignorance. 34 We see here
the connection with the namelessness of the Tao, the name-

' less name of the God who reveals himself to Moses, of the
"absolute Nothing 55 of Meister Eckhart. Man can only know
the negation, never the position of ultimate reality. "Mean-
while man can not know what God is, even though he be
ever so well aware of what God is not. . . . Thus contented
with nothing, the mind clamors for the highest good of
all." 35 For Meister Eckhart, "The Divine One is a negation
of negations, and a denial of denials. . . . Every creature
contains a negation: one denies that it is the other." 36 It is
only a further consequence that God becomes for Meister
Eckhart "The absolute Nothing," just as the ultimate reality
is the "En Sof," the Endless One, for the Kabalah.

I have discussed the difference between Aristotelian and
paradoxical logic in order to prepare the ground for an im-
portant difference in the concept of the love of God. The
teachers of paradoxical logic say that man can perceive
reality only in contradictions, and can never perceive in
thought the ultimate reality-unity, the One itself. This led
to the consequence that one did not seek as the ultimate aim
to find the answer in thought. Thought can only lead us to

84 Cf. Zimmer, ibid., p. 424.

35 Meister Eckhart, translated by R. B. Blakney, Harper & Brothers,
New York, 1941, p. 114.

36 Ibid., p. 247. Cf. also the negative theology of Maimonides.



78 THE ART OF LOVING

the knowledge that it cannot give us the ultimate answer.
The world of thought remains caught in the paradox. The
only way in which the world can be grasped ultimately lies,
not in thought, but in the act, in the experience of oneness.
Thus paradoxical logic leads to the conclusion that the love
of God is neither the knowledge of God in thought, nor the
thought of one's love of God, but the act of experiencing the
oneness with God.

This leads to the emphasis on the right way of living. All
of life, every little and every important action, is devoted to
the knowledge of God, but a knowledge not in right thought,
but in right action. This can be clearly seen in Oriental re-
ligions. In Brahmanism as well as in Buddhism and Taoism,
the ultimate aim of religion is not the right belief, but the
right action. We find the same emphasis in the Jewish re-
ligion. There was hardly ever a schism over belief in the
Jewish tradition (the one great exception, the difference be-
tween Pharisees and Sadducees, was essentially one of two
opposite social classes). The emphasis of the Jewish religion
was (especially from the beginning of our era on) on the
right way of living, the Halacha (this word actually having
the same meaning as the Tao) .

In modern history, the same principle is expressed in the
thought of Spinoza, Marx and Freud. In Spinoza's philoso-
phy the emphasis is shifted from the right belief to the right
conduct of life. Marx stated the same principle when he
said, "The philosophers have interpreted the world in dif-
ferent ways — the task is to transform it." Freud's paradoxical
logic leads him to the process of psychoanalytic therapy, the
ever deepening experience of oneself.



THE THEORY OF LOVE 79

From the standpoint of paradoxical logic the emphasis is
not on thought, but on the act. This attitude had several
other consequences. First of all, it led to the tolerance which
we find in Indian and Chinese religious development. If the
right thought is not the ultimate truth, and not the way to
salvation, there is no reason to fight others, whose thinking
has arrived at different formulations. This tolerance is beau-
tifully expressed in the story of several men who were asked
to describe an elephant in the dark. One, touching his trunk,
said "this animal is like a water pipe" ; another, touching
his ear, said "this animal is like a fan" ; a third, touching
; his legs, described the animal as a pillar.

Secondly, the paradoxical standpoint led to the emphasis
i on transforming man, rather than to the development of
dogma on the one hand, and science on the other. From the
; Indian, Chinese and mystical standpoints, the religious task
of man is not to think right, but to act right, and/or to
become one with the One in the act of concentrated medita-
tion.

The opposite is true for the main stream of Western
thought. Since one expected to find the ultimate truth in the
right thought, major emphasis was on thought, although
right action was held to be important too. In religious de-
velopment this led to the formulation of dogmas, endless
arguments about dogmatic formulations, and intolerance of
the "non-believer" or heretic. It furthermore led to the
emphasis on "believing in God" as the main aim of a re-
ligious attitude. This, of course, did not mean that there
was not also the concept that one ought to live right. But



80 THE ART OF LOVING

nevertheless, the person who believed in God — even if he
did not live God — felt himself to be superior to the one
who lived God, but did not "believe" in him.

The emphasis on thought has also another and historically
a very important consequence. The idea that one could find
the truth in thought led not only to dogma, but also to
science. In scientific thought, the correct thought is all that
matters, both from the aspect of intellectual honesty, as well
as from the aspect of the application of scientific thought to
practice — that is, to technique.

In short, paradoxical thought led to tolerance and an
effort toward self-transformation. The Aristotelian stand-
point led to dogma and science, to the Catholic Church, and
to the discovery of atomic energy.

The consequences of this difference between the two stand-
points for the problem of the love of God have already been
explained implicitly, and need only to be summarized briefly.

In the dominant Western religious system, the love of God
is essentially the same as the belief in God, in God's exist-
ence, God's justice, God's love. The love of God is essentially
a thought experience. In the Eastern religions and in mys-
ticism, the love of God is an intense feeling experience of
oneness, inseparably linked with the expression of this love in
every act of living. The most radical formulation has been
given to this goal by Meister Eckhart: "If therefore I am
changed into God and He makes me one with Himself, then,
by the living God, there is no distinction between us. . . .
Some people imagine that they are going to see God, that
they are going to see God as if he were standing yonder, and
they here, but it is not to be so. God and I: we are one.



THE THEORY OF LOVE



8l



By knowing God I take him to myself. By loving God, I
penetrate him," 37

We can return now to an important parallel between the
love for one's parents and the love for God. The child starts
out by being attached to his mother as "the ground of all
being. 55 He feels helpless and needs the all-enveloping love
of mother. He then turns to father as the new center of his
affections, father being a guiding principle for thought and
action; in this stage he is motivated by the need to acquire
father's praise, and to avoid his displeasure. In the stage of
full maturity he has freed himself from the person of mother
and of father as protecting and commanding powers; he has
established the motherly and fatherly principles in himself.
He has become his own father and mother; he is father and
mother. In the history of the human race we see — and can
anticipate — the same development: from the beginning of
the love for God as the helpless attachment to a mother
Goddess, through the obedient attachment to a fatherly God,
to a mature stage where God ceases to be an outside power,
where man has incorporated the principles of love and jus-
tice into himself, where he has become one with God, and
eventually, to a point where he speaks of God only in a
poetic, symbolic sense.

From these considerations it follows that the love for God
cannot be separated from the love for one's parents. If a per-
son does not emerge from incestuous attachment to mother,
clan, nation, if he retains the childish dependence on a
punishing and rewarding father, or any other authority, he
cannot develop a more mature love for God; then his re-

37 Meister Eckhart, op. cit., pp. 181-2.



82 THE ART OF LOVING

ligion is that of the earlier phase of religion, in which
God was experienced as an all-protective mother or a
punishing-rewarding father.

In contemporary religion we find all the phases, from the
earliest and most primitive development to the highest, still
present. The word "God" denotes the tribal chief as well as
the "absolute Nothing.' 5 In the same way, each individual
retains in himself, in his unconscious, as Freud has shown,
all the stages from the helpless infant on. The question is to
what point he has grown. One thing is certain : the nature
of his love for God corresponds to the nature of his love for
man, and furthermore, the real quality of his love for God
and man often is unconscious — covered up and rationalized
by a more mature thought of what his love is. Love for
man, furthermore, while directly embedded in his relations
to his family, is in the last analysis determined by the struc-
ture of the society in which he lives. If the social structure
is one of submission to authority — overt authority or the
anonymous authority of the market and public opinion, his
concept of God must be infantile and far from the mature
concept, the seeds of which are to be found in the history
of monotheistic religion.


Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on November 01, 2017, 12:31:04 PM
"At a still later stage man gives his gods the form of human beings. It seems that this can happen only when he has become still more aware of himself, and when he has discovered man as the highest and most dignified "thing" in the world."

Interesting.  Is there another stage, for us as humans, on the horizon?  Are we presently seeing the birth of that stage?  Are we escaping our delusions expressed by Sagan, that of privilege, self-worth, and special position in the universe?   
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on January 28, 2018, 20:11:33 PM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on July 21, 2017, 08:47:23 AM
I've sort of overextended my reading as of lately. Three books going at once.

I'm struggling to finish John Galligan's fourth and last installment of his fly-fishing mystery series.

I'm trying to find time to make meaningful headway further into Millard's "The River of Doubt."

I'm also reading intermittently, "The Passing of the Night" by Robinson Risner.

With limited time, I have finally finished all three of these.

"The River of Doubt" was highly enjoyable after the first 40 pages or so of political talk.

I'm prospecting for something new. Has anyone read "The Worst Journey in the World"....?

Other suggestions?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on January 28, 2018, 20:17:45 PM
"The Lost City of Z"?

"Into the Wild"?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on January 28, 2018, 22:17:48 PM
I meant to post this a while back.

Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History

This an interesting read. Sheds a lot of light on coyote populations. It is also very bais, in favor of the coyote.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0465093728/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517195749&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=coyote+america&dpPl=1&dpID=51sXC5T%2BPwL&ref=plSrch

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Jfey on January 31, 2018, 20:55:06 PM
Quote from: driver on January 28, 2018, 22:17:48 PM
I meant to post this a while back.

Coyote America: A Natural and Supernatural History

This an interesting read. Sheds a lot of light on coyote populations. It is also very bais, in favor of the coyote.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0465093728/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1517195749&sr=8-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_QL65&keywords=coyote+america&dpPl=1&dpID=51sXC5T%2BPwL&ref=plSrch

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He's been on Joe Rogan's podcast a few times.   Very interesting to hear what he has to say about coyotes.   


Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on February 01, 2018, 09:09:42 AM
Thanks for posting this one.    I'm interested in learning more about them since they wake me up every night!
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: natureboy on February 02, 2018, 16:38:46 PM
I'm wrapping up Abbey's Desert Solitaire, I've enjoyed it.  Doug how was the Hillbilly Elegy?  I have it on the shelf, but haven't queued it up yet.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on February 02, 2018, 18:45:44 PM
Quote from: natureboy on February 02, 2018, 16:38:46 PM
I'm wrapping up Abbey's Desert Solitaire, I've enjoyed it.  Doug how was the Hillbilly Elegy?  I have it on the shelf, but haven't queued it up yet.
It was good not great. I think I was maybe too educated on the basic premise. The personal side of the book was the highlight for me. How folks rise up from shitty upbringings is amazing. He is 1 in a thousand? A hundred thousand?

Went back and re-read Rocket Boys after that. Another great story of perseverance.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 02, 2018, 22:13:44 PM
I'm into Hillbilly Elegy now. Not loving it so far. I'll continue to muddle onward.....
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on February 14, 2018, 17:09:16 PM
New to the plate.
Reviews later.visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on February 14, 2018, 18:42:02 PM
Quote from: Dougfish on February 14, 2018, 17:09:16 PM
New to the plate.
Reviews later.visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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Oh. Those both sound very interesting.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 14, 2018, 18:55:23 PM
visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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I enjoy some of King's work — others, not so much. I especially enjoyed "Under the Dome." That was a long read.

The Jonestown book, "A Thousand Lives," was good. It's amazing and frightening at what and how people succumb to manipulative treatment. I was glued to this book.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 15, 2018, 11:50:26 AM
Ray Comfort?  This Ray Comfort!!!   

8-13 bucks on Amazon - save your money or buy a half dozen or so of Marvel Comics.

http://youtu.be/BXLqDGL1FSg
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on February 15, 2018, 11:52:34 AM
I want to read that brook trout book. Would like to read your review first, Doug.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 15, 2018, 16:43:02 PM
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Another good read. Great example of a book that's better than the movie.

When I initially read Peter Benchley's, "Jaws," I was taken back by the scenes that were in the book but never existed in the ever popular seventies flick. Love that book/movie.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 15, 2018, 16:57:45 PM
The detail that you purchased Comfort screams cynicism.  I hope you found it in the bargain bucket at Wal-Mart and had a fragile moment. 

Whelen and Angier (1965) are on their way to my mailbox. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 15, 2018, 19:30:47 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 15, 2018, 16:57:45 PM

The detail that you purchased Comfort screams cynicism.  I hope you found it in the bargain bucket at Wal-Mart and had a fragile moment. 


I'm unable to recall where, or, really, why, I purchased that book. It was a waste of time and money. Cynical, I am.


Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: greg on February 15, 2018, 20:51:26 PM
How are the galliagan books? I read nail knot years ago and had trouble staying awake long enough to read it. Did they get any better?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 15, 2018, 21:42:14 PM
Quote from: greg on February 15, 2018, 20:51:26 PM
How are the galliagan books? I read nail knot years ago and had trouble staying awake long enough to read it. Did they get any better?

They're all sort of similar. I took breaks while reading them all. They're okay.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on February 16, 2018, 09:00:59 AM
This book is for Muddy. He needs instructions.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on February 16, 2018, 11:41:50 AM
Quote from: Phil on February 15, 2018, 11:52:34 AM
I want to read that brook trout book. Would like to read your review first, Doug.

379 pages.  :o
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on February 16, 2018, 11:50:17 AM
Quote from: Phil on February 16, 2018, 09:00:59 AM
This book is for Muddy. He needs instructions.

visitors can't see pics , please register or login

That book is dumb AF.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on February 16, 2018, 13:05:11 PM
Quote from: billythreetimes on April 28, 2017, 08:57:16 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on April 28, 2017, 08:21:06 AM
Quote from: billythreetimes on April 28, 2017, 07:10:59 AM
Quote from: tomato can on April 28, 2017, 05:37:11 AM
Anything by McCarthy is superlative.  My favorite is the Orchard Keeper and if you want to laugh out loud like a hyena check out his book "Suttree".

Glad to see this. I've been wanting to get into McCarthy, but always get tied up in something else.

Currently finishing up Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life by William Finnegan and re-reading Dharma Bums while in search of some sort of inspiration.

Dharma Bums is Kerouac for high school freshmen.  Give Desolation Angels a spin if you're man enough.

Will. Interested in The Tower, let me know how that one is.

I am finally getting around to reading this.  It's actually pretty interesting.  As suspected it is very first world problems but raises some interesting questions about "outdoor" ethics.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Aka on February 16, 2018, 15:58:12 PM
Quote from: Dougfish on July 19, 2017, 11:26:54 AM
Quote from: rbphoto on July 18, 2017, 13:59:22 PM

I've met @Dougfish 's wife and she is wonderful.  She let's him fish, drink beer and spend time with the likes of all of us here.

Strike 1 for @Mudwall Gatewood 3.0

Yeah, I do have a pretty sweet gig.  -0-

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I just finished that on a quick trip to Seattle last week. Well written, interesting, not sure how I feel about everything he says but a hell of a story.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 17, 2018, 10:01:35 AM
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Finished this earlier this morning. It took me a bit to get into it. Oftentimes, I'd find myself with the book in my lap — my eyes gazing at nothing out a window. Some areas of this book and the author's experiences came as a sucker punch; many things I reflected upon, and even understood a little better after completing this book. I'm glad you guys brought this to the book thread. Enjoyed it.

Now for new material......decisions.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on February 17, 2018, 12:12:09 PM
Right now, I'm reading Ron Rash's Something Rich and Strange. Very good. Ron Rash is one of my favorite authors.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: natureboy on February 19, 2018, 11:50:41 AM
I started reading Norman Maclean's Young Men and Fire this weekend, it's pretty intense so far.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 19, 2018, 12:58:32 PM
I'm 100+ pages into Stephen King's, "The Stand" — one long book this will be. 1400+ pages if I'm not mistaken.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on February 19, 2018, 12:59:51 PM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on February 19, 2018, 12:58:32 PM
I'm 100+ pages into Stephen King's, "The Stand" — one long book this will be. 1400+ pages if I'm not mistaken.

It's one of King's best imo.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 19, 2018, 13:14:32 PM
Quote from: Phil on February 19, 2018, 12:59:51 PM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on February 19, 2018, 12:58:32 PM
I'm 100+ pages into Stephen King's, "The Stand" — one long book this will be. 1400+ pages if I'm not mistaken.

It's one of King's best imo.

That's what I keep hearing and reading. I've tried a few times to get into it and failed. It's looking a bit more promising this go around. I have the extended and uncut version which is much longer than the original after it was edited down to 800-some pages.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on February 19, 2018, 18:34:13 PM
Quote from: natureboy on February 19, 2018, 11:50:41 AM
I started reading Norman Maclean's Young Men and Fire this weekend, it's pretty intense so far.

Good one.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on February 19, 2018, 18:42:57 PM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on February 19, 2018, 12:58:32 PM
I'm 100+ pages into Stephen King's, "The Stand" — one long book this will be. 1400+ pages if I'm not mistaken.

Another good one. Probably my favorite of King's stuff, and I've read about all of them.


If any of you have never read Ron Rash, pick up one of his collections of short stories, or a novel like The World Made Straight, One Foot in Eden, or any of the others. He is one of the best voices of Appalachia.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 22, 2018, 16:57:06 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 15, 2018, 16:57:45 PM
Whelen and Angier (1965) are on their way to my mailbox.

I received 2 copies of this by mistake -- ended up paying for 2 but dirt cheap.

The first person to PM w/ name and mailing address can have it - free and I'll mail next week.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on February 22, 2018, 17:01:16 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 22, 2018, 16:57:06 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on February 15, 2018, 16:57:45 PM
Whelen and Angier (1965) are on their way to my mailbox.

I received 2 copies of this by mistake -- ended up paying for 2 but dirt cheap.

The first person to PM w/ name and mailing address can have it - free and I'll mail next week.
Buy a book on "How to respond to email and other modern communications beyond smoke signals".

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: themidge on February 22, 2018, 21:35:58 PM
Read Hillbilly Elegy and really enjoyed it. Now reading Pottlikker Papers by John Edge: https://www.amazon.com/Potlikker-Papers-History-Modern-South/dp/1594206554

Good so far, but not far enough in to give a true assessment.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on February 23, 2018, 11:09:58 AM
Big fan of Ron Rash and John T. Edge. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on February 27, 2018, 08:43:55 AM
Just read To Kill a Mockingbird again, haven't read it in a couple decades. Still good.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 08, 2018, 18:29:21 PM
I just read Don Starkell's Paddle to the Amazon. Interesting tale. A guy and his son hop into a canoe in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They paddle it up the Red River, down the Mississippi, then through the Intracoastal Waterway to the Mexican border. Then they paddle down the coasts of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama to South America. They paddle around the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela to Trinidad. Then they head up the Orinoco River, across to the Rio Negro, which they paddle down to the Amazon. Two years after they left Canada, they arrive at the mouth of the Amazon. Helluva trip.

I am currently reading the original 1818 version of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 08, 2018, 18:35:12 PM
Quote from: Yallerhammer on March 08, 2018, 18:29:21 PM
I just read Don Starkell's Paddle to the Amazon. Interesting tale. A guy and his son hop into a canoe in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They paddle it up the Red River, down the Mississippi, then through the Intracoastal Waterway to the Mexican border. Then they paddle down the coasts of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama to South America. They paddle around the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela to Trinidad. Then they head up the Orinoco River, across to the Rio Negro, which they paddle down to the Amazon. Two years after they left Canada, they arrive at the mouth of the Amazon. Helluva trip.

I am currently reading the original 1818 version of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.

Would love to do something like that. I remember reading "Horry and the Waccamaw." I was ready to take off.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 09, 2018, 09:28:55 AM
Currently reading devil's highway.  I was hoping for more policy interspersed with the story but the story is pretty solid and well told.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 09, 2018, 09:31:10 AM
Quote from: Yallerhammer on March 08, 2018, 18:29:21 PM
I just read Don Starkell's Paddle to the Amazon. Interesting tale. A guy and his son hop into a canoe in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They paddle it up the Red River, down the Mississippi, then through the Intracoastal Waterway to the Mexican border. Then they paddle down the coasts of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama to South America. They paddle around the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela to Trinidad. Then they head up the Orinoco River, across to the Rio Negro, which they paddle down to the Amazon. Two years after they left Canada, they arrive at the mouth of the Amazon. Helluva trip.

I am currently reading the original 1818 version of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.
I'm a sucker for books like that.  A couple that come to mind are "Backcast" by Lou Urecek, "Braving It" by James Campbell, and "River of Doubt".
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 09, 2018, 11:29:34 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on March 09, 2018, 09:31:10 AM
Quote from: Yallerhammer on March 08, 2018, 18:29:21 PM
I just read Don Starkell's Paddle to the Amazon. Interesting tale. A guy and his son hop into a canoe in Winnipeg, Manitoba. They paddle it up the Red River, down the Mississippi, then through the Intracoastal Waterway to the Mexican border. Then they paddle down the coasts of Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama to South America. They paddle around the coasts of Colombia and Venezuela to Trinidad. Then they head up the Orinoco River, across to the Rio Negro, which they paddle down to the Amazon. Two years after they left Canada, they arrive at the mouth of the Amazon. Helluva trip.

I am currently reading the original 1818 version of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.
I'm a sucker for books like that.  A couple that come to mind are "Backcast" by Lou Urecek, "Braving It" by James Campbell, and "River of Doubt".

I've read and have a copy of "River of Doubt." Great story, and I wish we still had presidents like Teddy. I'll have to check the other two out.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on March 09, 2018, 11:41:50 AM
Re-read this one a week or so ago, too.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on March 09, 2018, 12:49:01 PM
Harry Middleton is probably my favorite "fishing writer" of all time.  I think he is way underappreciated as an author in general, too. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: greg on March 11, 2018, 17:19:08 PM
I reread on the spine of time and the earth is enough about once a year. Read the bright country and rivers of memory. Hope to someday snag a copy of starlight creek.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 04, 2018, 10:25:15 AM

Quote from: greg on March 11, 2018, 17:19:08 PMI reread on the spine of time and the earth is enough about once a year. Read the bright country and rivers of memory. Hope to someday snag a copy of starlight creek.





https://www.brfff.com/forum/index.php/topic,15169.0.html
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on April 10, 2018, 11:34:49 AM
another good one from david joy

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/02/magazine/gun-culture-is-my-culture-and-i-fear-for-what-it-has-become.html
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on April 10, 2018, 16:31:03 PM
Reading this....anything by HS is pretty good
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on April 11, 2018, 15:41:55 PM
Quote from: Beetle on April 10, 2018, 16:31:03 PM
Reading this....anything by HS is pretty good

I enjoyed that one a lot. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on April 11, 2018, 15:42:31 PM
https://www.amazon.com/Gods-Middle-Finger-Lawless-Sierra/dp/1416534407

One of the most entertaining books I've read in a long time. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on April 30, 2018, 08:07:36 AM
Enjoying this one.....a lot

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on April 30, 2018, 08:21:58 AM
Interesting review

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/13/books/review/earth-is-weeping-peter-cozzens.html

the gist is this:

QuoteStill, I have a feeling the academic fight for the true legacy of the Indian Wars — Brown [author of Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee] versus Cozzens — has just begun.
Title: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on May 26, 2018, 16:48:26 PM
Finished "The Stand" earlier this evening. Complete and uncut version was the longest book I've read thus far at 1439 pages.

Interesting book.

Now for a new one to delve into....
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on May 26, 2018, 17:08:40 PM
I'm starting Julia Navarro's "Story of a Sociopath."

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on June 01, 2018, 07:48:22 AM
I saw Woolly was reading this so I got it.......great combo of history, fishing, birds and true crime.    Read it in two nights



https://amzn.to/2Jq4Lyd
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 01, 2018, 09:54:45 AM
Quote from: Beetle on June 01, 2018, 07:48:22 AM
I saw Woolly was reading this so I got it.......great combo of history, fishing, birds and true crime.    Read it in two nights

Wasn't that a great read! Couldn't put it down!


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 02, 2018, 05:59:54 AM
Here you go

https://lithub.com/thomas-mcguane-on-not-living-the-writers-life/


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on June 06, 2018, 10:45:19 AM
Been reading Michael Pollan's new book about 'shrooms (maaaan) after buying into the pre-release hype and must say, 100 pages in, it's a very interesting read.  Have a feel it will blow the doors of preconceived notions surrounding our fungi brother and the like.

Full name:  How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Jfey on June 07, 2018, 07:44:28 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on April 11, 2018, 15:42:31 PM
https://www.amazon.com/Gods-Middle-Finger-Lawless-Sierra/dp/1416534407

One of the most entertaining books I've read in a long time.

Agree.   That final scene was pretty crazy.  Stupid gringo.

Gives a new perspective on why so many  South of the border want to migrate out of there.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: sanjuanwormhatch on June 07, 2018, 09:19:42 AM
Quote from: Jeff Fey on June 07, 2018, 07:44:28 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on April 11, 2018, 15:42:31 PM
https://www.amazon.com/Gods-Middle-Finger-Lawless-Sierra/dp/1416534407

One of the most entertaining books I've read in a long time.

Agree.   That final scene was pretty crazy.  Stupid gringo.

Gives a new perspective on why so many  South of the border want to migrate out of there.

I bought some JPS Brown books after reading and the guy has a way with words and really captures the spirit of Sierra Madre (that sounded really professorial but couldn't come up with another way to say it).  Plot in Jim Kane is lacking but I would still read it.  I've had my eye on a forests of the night that doesn't cost $50 since reading. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Jfey on June 07, 2018, 10:46:40 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on June 07, 2018, 09:19:42 AM
Quote from: Jeff Fey on June 07, 2018, 07:44:28 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on April 11, 2018, 15:42:31 PM
https://www.amazon.com/Gods-Middle-Finger-Lawless-Sierra/dp/1416534407

One of the most entertaining books I've read in a long time.

Agree.   That final scene was pretty crazy.  Stupid gringo.

Gives a new perspective on why so many  South of the border want to migrate out of there.

I bought some JPS Brown books after reading and the guy has a way with words and really captures the spirit of Sierra Madre (that sounded really professorial but couldn't come up with another way to say it).  Plot in Jim Kane is lacking but I would still read it.  I've had my eye on a forests of the night that doesn't cost $50 since reading.

Cool I'll check those out.   Really interesting to learn about the way of life down there.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on August 11, 2018, 15:19:27 PM

Interview with the Author of The Feather Thief...


https://www.thisamericanlife.org/654/the-feather-heist
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on August 11, 2018, 15:33:25 PM
Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter (https://amzn.to/2vGcR0U)


This was an interesting read. Again a little one sided, but makes you see beaver a little differently.

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on August 11, 2018, 21:55:27 PM
Thanks Driver.    I'm going to check that out. 

I enjoyed this one Cattle Kingdom (https://amzn.to/2OtJaak)

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: NCsporksman on August 11, 2018, 22:31:18 PM


In A Far Country (https://amzn.to/2MjPST6)

Just read this again, pretty baller all around true AK story

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on August 12, 2018, 08:38:16 AM
Lots of great suggestions, fellars. Bravo!

I owe you some feedback and previews.

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Appalachia. Meh. More of a masters thesis than a good book. Some good points, but not a good read.

Brook trout. Whew, long read. Learned alot though. Who would have thought that Long Island was a hot spot for brookies? Salters still there today. I was skipping over parts of some later chapters on Canadian waters when it was repititive. This book strengthened the premise that human beings suck.

Bryson's At Home is a re-read. Everything he has written is gold. I've read every one of his books 2 or more times. This one looks at the evolution of our residences. The rooms. The lighting, the plumbing, the cooking. Everything. And he makes it all so entertaining and educational at the same time.

The Feather Thief and War on Peace are my beach books. Can't wait.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on August 16, 2018, 08:34:04 AM
Podcast Alert:

This American Life just did one on the Feather Thief.    Podcast #654

https://www.thisamericanlife.org/654/the-feather-heist

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: itieuglyflies on August 16, 2018, 15:04:23 PM
Just read Feather Thief last week ( like Woolly I could not put it down). Stumbled on the This American Life segment about this true story and they even had interviews with the author and some of the main characters in the book. All fly tiers should enjoy this fascinating read.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: BRFFF on August 16, 2018, 18:10:01 PM
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Back in the good ole days


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on September 02, 2018, 08:18:49 AM
As reported before, The Feather Thief was a very good read. Thoroughly enjoyed it. visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 04, 2018, 09:41:30 AM
Finished another King novel, "Carrie". Much better than the movie, as usual.

Now, back to another non-fiction work.

Decisions, decisions.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 08, 2018, 15:34:34 PM
Just finished "The Catcher in the Rye". I'd heard lots about it over the years and figured what the hey.

I read it in 3 days. Not sure what the big deal with that book is? Sort of oddly written, maybe it's just me.

It does use the word, "goddam", more than any movie or piece of literature I've ever been involved with.
Title: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 14, 2018, 11:39:40 AM


This was one of the better books I've read in a good while. Finished it up this morning. I'll be picking up more of his work.

I enjoyed the story as much as I enjoyed the bits and pieces of history and factual enlightenment that is scattered throughout. An eye-opener.

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Now, next on my reading agenda: King's "'Salem's Lot", and Rohrig's "Lost on the Appalachian Trail". I'm swinging by the book store this evening to pick these up.

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on November 14, 2018, 14:14:45 PM
Everything Bryson is gold. visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 14, 2018, 14:24:58 PM
Quote from: Dougfish on November 14, 2018, 14:14:45 PM
Everything Bryson is gold. visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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I remember you making that statement some time ago. I'll definitely be looking into more of his work. The one I just finished there, it actually had some funny stretches. I laughed out loud (yeah, lol) several times. Enjoyed it big time.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on November 14, 2018, 14:38:03 PM
And you learn alot with the chuckles...visitors can't see pics , please register or login


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Title: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 14, 2018, 14:52:44 PM
Those portions were worth reading the book for. Lots of things highlighted and brought to attention in a brief but clearly comprehensible, effective way.

When speaking about the mountains and how they will eventually come and go — stopping and considering topics of that nature puts me in a trance.

How we perceive time in our little, blink of an eye lifetimes versus the actual immense, unfathomable measure of the full scope of the world's history can be hilarious.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on November 26, 2018, 15:16:43 PM
Bill Bryson is a good writer, but I just can't like anybody who would throw away Little Debbies.  :o
Title: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 27, 2018, 21:33:54 PM
Finished up Kyle Rohrig's "Lost on the Appalachian Trail" earlier this evening."

Thoroughly enjoyed the detailed accounts of his adventure while thru-hiking the entire trail. I'd love to try and do something like that even if I had to do it in pieces.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 28, 2018, 09:19:36 AM
I'm still thinking about how Mr. Rohrig repeatedly and knowingly broke rules/policies and then wrote a book about it all.

Reminds me of when I post trip reports with photos of the "No Trespassing" signs along the way.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on December 05, 2018, 13:56:17 PM
Finished up with King's "'Salem's Lot" this afternoon. Good book. Kept me hooked pretty good.

Two more books are awaiting me at the bookstore. Looking forward to new material.

Reading has began to vary in subject. Fictional, non-fictional, adventure, etc. A good mix here and there is pleasant.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on December 06, 2018, 09:41:47 AM
Next three pieces of reading are as follows:

-- Stephen King's "The Shining" (beginning to see a trend here?)

-- Blair Braverman's "Welcome to the Goddamn Ice Cube: Chasing Fear and Finding Home in the Great White North" (what a title choice!)

-- John Boessenecker's "Texas Ranger: The Epic Life of Frank Hamer, the Man Who Killed Bonnie and Clyde" (looking forward to this one)


Thoughts? Suggestions?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on December 13, 2018, 13:57:43 PM
The Shining is a damned good book. A great book to let yourself fall wholly into with full imagination. Much better than the movie, per usual.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on December 17, 2018, 11:47:21 AM
Welcome to the Goddamn Ice Cube brought some insight into the way of living in extreme northern regions. Somewhat interesting yet overall, meh.

A portion describing the night when the writer dug several feet deep down into the frozen tundra was the best. She'd dug several feet straight down, then several feet horizontally; this way she could get into her sleeping bag and be insulated while lying on her back (the hole was "L-shaped"), trapping her body heat underneath the accumulated feet of snow thus keeping warm through the night's frigid hours. Apparently, the hole was just a little larger than her own body.

She awoke the following morning with the grand surprise that a blizzard had filled the hole back in overnight and was frozen hard. She couldn't move and was confined to a space about like a casket. This description gave me the claustrophobic feels.



Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: BRFFF on December 18, 2018, 14:04:06 PM
Paradise only a buck fifty

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Title: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 24, 2018, 09:31:19 AM
https://amzn.to/2V4qEK1

50 years on Rocket Men tells the story of Apollo 8, the first mission to the moon!

I listened to the Audible version and found it fascinating, so much so that after listening to the entire book in 3 days I then watched Apollo 13, one of my favorite all time movies!

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BBC program on the mission with interviews with the astronauts and the author!

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m0001qn1
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on December 27, 2018, 10:35:48 AM
I'm on the final homestretch of this series.    Malcolm turned me on to it.


https://amzn.to/2Vc5E3T
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Aka on December 27, 2018, 15:42:54 PM
Quote from: Beetle on December 27, 2018, 10:35:48 AM
I'm on the final homestretch of this series.    Malcolm turned me on to it.


https://amzn.to/2Vc5E3T

How is Malcolm?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on January 29, 2019, 20:50:39 PM
Copied from my FB.


Short stories? Anyone?

Just finished "Night Shift" by Mr. King.

Enjoyed most of them; a nice change of pace.

#jerusalemslot
#graveyardshift
#nightsurf
#iamthedoorway
#themangler
#theboogeyman
#graymatter
#battleground
#trucks
#sometimestheycomeback
#strawberryspring
#theledge
#thelawnmowerman
#quittersinc
#iknowwhatyouneed
#childrenofthecorn
#thelastrungontheladder
#themanwholovedflowers
#onefortheroad
#thewomanintheroom



Finished up with King's "The Dead Zone" late last night.

What a great book. Surprising to me that it's not more popular as many of his other works are.



Gillian Flynn's "Sharp Objects."

Enjoyed this.

A nice change up. Female authors offer a fresh spin with their own honest perspectives regarding people, situations, etc.

Thoughts? Suggestions?


Currently I'm reading the "One Second After" series. Very good so far.




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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on January 29, 2019, 22:29:06 PM
I've got three books started. For over four months.  b';
Work, work, work. Family life, fly tying, garden work, rod building get in the way.
An upcoming balcony on the Gulf coast might be the ticket.
Unless the fish are biting... V:;
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 02, 2019, 20:54:01 PM
You cannot see attachments on this board.One Second After by William Forstchen.

This was a great book. An eye-opener into what seems to be a very real and possible threat to our country. I’ve purchased the other two novels in this trilogy. Look forward to getting into those as well.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 19, 2019, 11:00:57 AM
This second novel in the trilogy is as good or better than the first. I'm looking forward to the third and final installment.You cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 09, 2019, 12:06:08 PM
I never thought about World War One prison escape stories. I was, from an early age, captivated by Steve McQueen in The Great Escape! I found this audiobook, The The Escape Artists: A Band of Daredevil Pilots and the Greatest Prison Break of the Great War by Neal Bascomb (https://amzn.to/2VwGlJG), in my local library's digital collection. It is a fascinating look back in time and I'm enjoying the stories of hardship, perseverance, failed attempts, and small successes.

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Check out the RB Digital (https://www.rbdigital.com/) app for access to your library's audiobook collections.


If you have a Prime Account you can watch the WWII epic for free https://amzn.to/2G0g2VN
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 16, 2019, 15:21:26 PM
The First Great Escape movie, a 44 minute BBC documentary about the main escape in the book in the above post, The Escape Artists, is available on Amazon and Free with Prime.

https://amzn.to/2InF7xj
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 21, 2019, 16:58:10 PM
Barnes and Nobles, Brown Dog, hardcover $6.98 - a must have!

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on June 19, 2019, 09:40:32 AM
Updating on completed novels over the last couple of months:

I finished William Forstchen's "One Second After" trilogy. The last of the trilogy, "The Final Day", was great, as was the entire series.

I completed my first Harlan Coben book - "Home" - good read for sure. Maybe more of his stuff waiting for me in the future.

A few more of Stephen King's works that I've finished up - "The Long Walk," "Roadwork," "The Running Man," and "Rage." All great as usual.

Completed "The Revenant" by Michael Punke. A great book, better than the flick, in my eyes.

Another King novel that I finished a week or so ago was "Firestarter." Enjoyed it.

Many of the books I've been reading are from an era before my own. The lingo, settings, fashion, vehicles, etc., are a hoot. I have to look much of this up to comprehend what they're actually referring to.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on June 19, 2019, 17:06:26 PM
Just finished Cujo. Another King novel.

This book rocked. What a suspenseful book. Very much worth picking up!

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on July 08, 2019, 08:14:15 AM
Another one retired to the bookshelf. A good book. I have many to read that you fellas have mentioned over the years here. Much work to do.You cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on July 10, 2019, 12:56:47 PM
This was a little different than my normal choices in reading, but after adjusting a little early on, it was ok.

"Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom."

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 06, 2019, 17:36:16 PM
Just finished this trilogy. Yes, I read it. I read all three back to back to back. Yep.

Subject matter was certainly something different for me. Comical how every female I encountered while going through these had read them already. These were not bad, but I'm so looking forward to starting something new.You cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on August 06, 2019, 22:07:11 PM
Just finishing up with this one by John Ehle. Sad.
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 07, 2019, 08:07:06 AM
Quote from: troutrus on August 06, 2019, 22:07:11 PMJust finishing up with this one by John Ehle. Sad.

Isn't reading out of doors grand?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on August 07, 2019, 15:28:43 PM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on August 07, 2019, 08:07:06 AM
Quote from: troutrus on August 06, 2019, 22:07:11 PMJust finishing up with this one by John Ehle. Sad.

Isn't reading out of doors grand?
Yes, when weather and bugs permit.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 12, 2019, 21:45:29 PM
So many people have seen movies that were adapted from the original written story. Like the movie? Imagine how much you'd enjoy the original, more detailed version. Read.

This is a great example. A very good, creepy story. Just finished it.

I enjoy catching the subtle hints and references to other King stories. This book mentioned Cujo, The Shining, Derry, and Jerusalem's Lot.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Sedition and Pockets on August 12, 2019, 22:31:36 PM
I have a habit of juggling several books at a time.  Gravity's Rainbow is a re-read.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Big J on August 14, 2019, 11:50:10 AM
Thread has taken an odd turn with Fifty Shades of Grey, Lenin, and Marx making an appearance.  Feel like there is a ironic dominance and enslavement theme trending here now.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on August 14, 2019, 13:18:29 PM
To lighten it up:
Eating better, losing some poundage, team Dougfish diet.

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Hiking lighter, smarter, scheming, losing some poundage.

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Cutting back on dis,  0:0 , a wee bit of a problem. :laugh:


Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 22, 2019, 21:49:30 PM
If you love the outdoors, birds/birding in particular, as I have always enjoyed, you'll love this book. A great, true, and inspiring adventure of a young man chasing his passion. Finished this earlier today.

#kennkaufman #birds #bigyear #kingbirdhighwayYou cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on August 23, 2019, 08:22:45 AM
Good one Devo- I will check that out!      Just finished Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire.....so good

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 23, 2019, 13:46:19 PM
Quote from: Beetle on August 23, 2019, 08:22:45 AMGood one Devo- I will check that out!      Just finished Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire.....so good



I'll make a note to add that to my to-read list. (Yes, I have a list. Current list to order is 22 books strong at the current time.) I'm always open for suggestions. I would order it now, but I have 8 more stacked atop my bookcase awaiting attention still at the moment.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on August 23, 2019, 14:30:54 PM
Devo, in IMGUR when you generate BBC code click "Huge Thumbnail" before you copy the text. You photos are massive.

Desert Solitaire is next in my queue on Audible.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 23, 2019, 21:52:06 PM
Quote from: driver on August 23, 2019, 14:30:54 PMDevo, in IMGUR when you generate BBC code click "Huge Thumbnail" before you copy the text. You photos are massive.

Desert Solitaire is next in my queue on Audible.

Thanks. I'll be using tapatalk again now that it's available. Hopefully pics won't be huge anymore.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on August 29, 2019, 05:53:06 AM
Thanks for the tip Mudwall.
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naturgemälde - A nature painting portraying wholeness.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on August 29, 2019, 13:32:59 PM
Quote from: troutrus on August 29, 2019, 05:53:06 AMThanks for the tip Mudwall.

naturgemälde - A nature painting portraying wholeness.


 Fascinating study and an amazing read about the great era of exploration ! 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 30, 2019, 07:59:35 AM
Thanks for posting. Added that to my to-read list.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on August 30, 2019, 14:40:44 PM
I remember seeing the movie adaptation of this book when I was a lot younger. Just finished the book. Illustrations were impressive by Mr. Wrightson. A good, quick read.

#stephenking #werewolf #berniewrightsonvisitors can't see pics , please register or login



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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on August 31, 2019, 06:18:19 AM
A true gem from the local Dollar Tree. Best suited for men in their 60's or older, this kept me laughing out loud.

mahvelous- incredible, outstanding.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on September 22, 2019, 08:16:29 AM
Informative read. Takes me back to my childhood in the 50's and 60's at the Jersey shore and seeing the insecticide fog truck treating areas where we played, fished, crabbed, and clammed. A few years later being subjected to the same in the workplace.
Not surprising to think of the numbers of friends/family members lost to cancer. 🙁You cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Onslow on September 22, 2019, 19:23:30 PM
My next read will be Bethania, the Village by the BLack Walnut Bottom.

Those are familiar with the history of WS, or a descendant of the Moravians, are probably acquainted with, or know of the diaries written various people in the community from the mid 1750s onward until just before the civil war.  This book has some very up close and personal accounts of everyday life in the days leading up to the  Revolutionary War.  Some very juicy material here.

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on October 09, 2019, 12:58:12 PM
Enjoyed this book big time! Mystery, truth, and history wrapped into one. 📚 #edwinrist #kirkwallacejohnson #alfredrusselwallace #deadbirds

Thanks to @Dougfish for mentioning this one.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 09, 2019, 15:30:08 PM
yup, a great true thriller and it involved a bulletin message board... 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on October 23, 2019, 05:58:02 AM
"It's lovely to live on a raft"
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on October 23, 2019, 06:34:07 AM
My favorite Mark Twain book is "Life on the Mississippi" I highly recommend reading it.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 23, 2019, 11:08:05 AM
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I heard about this bio on a Dr. Drew podcast!
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 23, 2019, 11:24:20 AM
Quote from: driver on October 23, 2019, 06:34:07 AMMy favorite Mark Twain book is "Life on the Mississippi" I highly recommend reading it.

And it's free!

https://www.gutenberg.org/files/245/245-h/245-h.htm
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on October 23, 2019, 14:15:39 PM
I can't get into listening to a book; very handy, but I just don't absorb what's being read to me, I zone out.

Also -- I'm almost exclusively reading non-fiction at this point. Most of the other stuff suddenly lost its appeal.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 23, 2019, 15:18:03 PM
Quote from: Dee-Vo on October 23, 2019, 14:15:39 PMI can't get into listening to a book; very handy, but I just don't absorb what's being read to me, I zone out.

Also -- I'm almost exclusively reading non-fiction at this point. Most of the other stuff suddenly lost its appeal.

I hear ya on the zoning out bit... but it helps pass the time on the road!
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on October 23, 2019, 19:33:55 PM
Enjoyed both books I've read by this fella. If you have an interest in birds in any capacity these will be good for you to check out. [emoji432] [emoji1659]

#kennkaufman #birds #flightsagainstthesunsetvisitors can't see pics , please register or login


https://amzn.to/2RFODOC


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on November 12, 2019, 18:51:27 PM
One of the better books I've read. Wilderness, nature, desert, future. Enjoyed this man's views 100%. A book that makes you want to disappear for a while, or, maybe, from now on.

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https://amzn.to/3aCT5pZ


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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on December 06, 2019, 19:20:24 PM
A relatively slow and difficult read for me, but picked up some new phrases and words, among which was TRUMPERY.
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/trumpery

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on January 04, 2020, 16:00:20 PM
In a world of divisive devices, science denial, and challenges to free speech, it is perhaps more relevant than at any time since it's original publication.
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https://amzn.to/2RIPHBt
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on January 09, 2020, 21:34:49 PM


This book is packed with information. So glad to be finished with it! 📖 📚


The history and people covered in these pages are too much to try and fathom. It's truly amazing how the thoughts/concerns of folks that far back in time are still ringing true today....maybe even more so today than in their respective times.

To be so connected, so deeply and emotionally, as some are to nature is heartening.

#humboldt #thoreau #darwin #goethe #marsh #haeckel #muir #nature #andreawulff


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(https://amzn.to/3a2N1GW)
https://amzn.to/3a2N1GW


Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on January 20, 2020, 10:40:23 AM
Quote from: Beetle on March 15, 2017, 09:08:38 AM
Quote from: sanjuanwormhatch on March 15, 2017, 08:16:02 AMI love Emerald Mile.  Have given that book as a present many times.

How is the stranger in the woods?

Stranger in the Woods was a good read but danced around a lot.  You could tell the author had to weave in historical and philosophical references to fill pages because there just wasn't much story to tell beyond 9 hours of conversation with Chris Knight (in jail).  I'd wait and find a used copy if you can.




I concur. Just finished this one. Good story, but sort of thin, in my opinion. Being a hermit would be nice, I think. Many people never give themselves the opportunity to experience silence and true solitude -- away from everyone and everything. Future will hold more of this for me. Maybe I'll be a hermit one day....if I'm lucky.

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https://amzn.to/2vhwD5I

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on January 22, 2020, 15:22:30 PM
"Little flashes of sun on the surface of a cold, dark sea."
― Jean-Paul Sartre, Nausea

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https://amzn.to/37lPJ91
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: JMiller on January 22, 2020, 20:31:46 PM

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 26, 2020, 18:53:52 PM
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you can find a copy here BookFinder . Com (https://www.bookfinder.com/search/?ac=sl&st=sl&ref=bf_s2_a1_t1_1&qi=,9QGJjpQunf24BcrNGk8NGgBCzU_1497963026_1:2:4&bq=author%3Dnelson%2520bryant%26title%3Dfresh%2520air%252C%2520bright%2520water%2520adventures%2520in%2520wood%252C%2520field%252C%2520and%2520stream)

I picked up this copy of Nelson Bryant's Book after reading his obit. It contains articles from his NYT column. Each story is a page and a half long. I was surprised to see the fourteenth was about Harper Creek, from back in the day when it was only open to anglers three days a week! They culled a 15 1/2" and a 13 brown.

Dr. Bahnson, who is mentioned in the story, a resident of Winston Salem, and a founding director of our TU Chapter (072)

QuoteBAHNSON
Dr. E. Reid Bahnson, 84, of Salemtowne the Moravian Retirement Community, died Monday, Jan. 14, 2002, at Forsyth Medical Center. He was born Oct. 28, 1917, in Winston-Salem to Frederic Fries Bahnson and Blecker Reid Bahnson. He attended Central School, South Junior High School, Reynolds High School, Davidson College and was graduated from the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in 1938, Phi Beta Kappa. Dr. Bahnson attended the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and was graduated in 1942 receiving the Alumni Medal for the highest academic average. He was a member of AOA Medical Fraternity. Dr. Bahnson served his internship and medical residency at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He was a medical officer in the U.S. Navy from July 1943 until May 1946, serving in the South Pacific. Dr. Bahnson began practice of internal medicine in Winston-Salem September 1948. In February 1976 he became the medical director of Winston-Salem Health Care Plan Inc., retiring in October 1983. He served as medical director of Piedmont Airlines from 1952 until 1987, was the former president of Forsyth County Medical Society and was president of the medical staff at City Memorial Hospital in 1964. He was a member of the Kiwanis Club, president of the North Carolina Orchid Society, a member of the board of directors of the American Rhododendron Society (1990-91), of the Piedmont Chapter, president of the North Carolina Botanical Garden Foundation , a lifelong member of Home Moravian Church, a member of the Board of World Missions of the Moravian Church and served on the board of directors of the Moravian Home. He was a founding director of Trout Unlimited. Survivors include his wife, Mrs. Louise Adler Bahnson of the Salemtowne Community; a daughter, Mrs. Jeanette Bahnson Halajian and husband Kenneth of Briarcliff Manor, N.Y.; a son, Edward Reid Bahnson Jr. and wife Diane of Girdwood, Alaska; two grandchildren Michael Reid Halajian and Samuel John Halajian; and a brother, Dr. Henry T. Bahnson of Pittsburgh, Pa. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 17, at Home Moravian Church by the Rev. Lehoma Goode and Dr. Robert Sawyer. Burial will follow in the Moravian Graveyard. Visitation will be in the Living Room of the Vogler Building at Moravian Salemtowne from 3:30 to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 16. Please use the Bethabara Park Boulevard entrance. Memorials may be given to NC Botanical Garden of the University of NC at Chapel Hill, CB 3375 Totten Center, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3375 or to the charity of the donor's choice.

I'll try and pinpoint the date this was written! 1968!

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You can find a copy here https://amzn.to/2GoVAyt

The very next story is about Outer Banks Fishing during the 11th international invitational blue marlin tournament! 

That would be in 1970!

Here is another NC story in the NYT

https://www.nytimes.com/1981/07/27/sports/outdoors-elusive-north-carolina-trout.html
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on February 16, 2020, 16:12:21 PM
"Ever drifting down the stream-
 Lingering in the golden gleam-
 Life, what is it but a dream?"
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on February 17, 2020, 13:14:00 PM
Good one here...

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https://amzn.to/32wsJSZ
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on February 26, 2020, 19:15:20 PM
Saltmarsh, where nature nurtures. My favorite ecosystem, and this light/fun read took me there.
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https://amzn.to/39hAxKI
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on February 28, 2020, 08:54:13 AM
Quote from: troutrus on February 26, 2020, 19:15:20 PMSaltmarsh, where nature nurtures. My favorite ecosystem, and this light/fun read took me there.
You cannot see attachments on this board.

https://amzn.to/39hAxKI

I'm looking forward to reading that one. On my list...
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 06, 2020, 17:21:47 PM
I have no idea why it's taken me so long to get around to reading this  :P You cannot see attachments on this board.

https://amzn.to/2IsXW00
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 07, 2020, 08:23:59 AM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 06, 2020, 17:21:47 PMI have no idea why it's taken me so long to get around to reading this  :P You cannot see attachments on this board.

https://amzn.to/2IsXW00

Read that ages ago. Wow.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on March 21, 2020, 23:26:18 PM
This makes the third book by Kenn Kaufman that I've read. Always very enjoyable. 🦅

The sheer magnitude of feats performed by migrating avian life on a normal basis is nothing less than amazing. And to think that it is overlooked and unnoticed by the vast majority of people is even more amazing. 📚

And this is but a tiny sliver of nature and its miracles.

Looking forward to more work from Mr. Kaufman.You cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on April 05, 2020, 03:11:03 AM
Out of all the King work I've read thus far, I think this one is the most 'out there' novel yet, besides maybe 'The Gunslinger.'

This was the first I'd read of Peter Straub, this convergence of these two accomplished authors' minds is pretty amazing.

The first 200-300 pages were tough to wrap my mind around, however, after a break for other reading, this was excellent.
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#flip #stephenking #peterstraub #thetalisman #territories
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Beetle on April 05, 2020, 18:16:22 PM
I am reading this.  It's a doomsday book about an EMP / nuke strike.    Based in Black Mountain.    A friend told me "I had to read it"

I don't do novels and can't say this one is going to change my opinion of them.   
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Phil on April 05, 2020, 18:41:22 PM
If it has a foreword by Newt, I'm probably not gonna like it.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on April 05, 2020, 20:51:30 PM
On a side note...
Watched "It's a Disaster" yesterday. Good dark comedy about couple's interactions during a nerve gas dirty bomb attack.
Got "Dr. Strangelove" que'd up on the computer for tomorrow. One of the best movies, ever.

Finishing up reading Rick Wilson's "Running Against The Devil". Good read and battle plan. And chuckles. 
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on April 06, 2020, 05:27:10 AM
"You're bound to get idears if you go thinkin' about stuff" j.s.
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on April 06, 2020, 07:53:13 AM
Quote from: Beetle on April 05, 2020, 18:16:22 PMI am reading this.  It's a doomsday book about an EMP / nuke strike.    Based in Black Mountain.    A friend told me "I had to read it"

I don't do novels and can't say this one is going to change my opinion of them.   

I read that entire trilogy about a year or so ago. I enjoyed all three books big time.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 12, 2020, 17:46:22 PM
Along with new wading boots, this came in the mail yesterday

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: greg on April 12, 2020, 18:54:04 PM
Have you read any yet? I'm getting ready to order. Got my last one from bob with light Cahill.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 12, 2020, 21:34:33 PM
Quote from: greg on April 12, 2020, 18:54:04 PMHave you read any yet? I'm getting ready to order. Got my last one from bob with light Cahill.

First chapter "Home Waters" just like me and the Smith except he live in Colorado  p;-
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on April 14, 2020, 19:57:19 PM
"When you learn, teach, when you get, give". -Maya Angelou

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on April 16, 2020, 07:05:43 AM
A 1956 classic.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Al on April 16, 2020, 10:09:18 AM
I've been going down memory lane by writing a few short stories about my time in Vietnam - written 12-15 so far and pasted them on FB. Thinking about consolidating them and maybe fleshing them out into a book but not sure about that yet.

One of the FB groups where I paste them got me to thinking about June Collins whom I knew from that era. At the time I met her she was a broker of bands and exotic dancers who toured the rear echelon units to entertain the troops. I met her when my immediate supervisor pulled me from command of one SF camp and sent me to another. There was about a week between assignments and I bunked with him at his hooch in Moc Hoa. Low and behold I wasn't the only one bunking with him - June was there sharing the same accommodations however the sleeping arrangements were a little different :P . Turns out she was there hiding from the Kakia Mafia as detailed in a book of the same title written by Robin Moore with June Collins as co-author. Some of you old fellows may remember the big military club scandal where lots of folks from that era went to jail or retired early - big conggresional investigation. I have the original hard copy of The Kakia Mafia - it's listed as costing over $1000 if you can find a copy. I recently re-read it and looked up June Collins on the internet. She is still alive and has written several more books about that era on her own. I downloaded the Kindle version of Goodbye Junie Moon and am reading it now. Brings back lots of memories. You cannot see attachments on this board.You cannot see attachments on this board. You cannot see attachments on this board.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on April 16, 2020, 13:37:24 PM
Do it, Al !

I read a 2010 interview with Ray Bradbury. What a great storyteller. In the inerview, his last answer was remarkable. You could build a great novel off of that answer.
Now I want to go back and read everything he wrote.

https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6012/the-art-of-fiction-no-203-ray-bradbury (https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6012/the-art-of-fiction-no-203-ray-bradbury)
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on April 23, 2020, 18:50:59 PM
"Three geese in a flock. One flew east, one flew west, and .............."
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Al on April 23, 2020, 19:10:52 PM
Quote from: Dougfish on April 16, 2020, 13:37:24 PMDo it, Al !

I read a 2010 interview with Ray Bradbury. What a great storyteller. In the inerview, his last answer was remarkable. You could build a great novel off of that answer.
Now I want to go back and read everything he wrote.

https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6012/the-art-of-fiction-no-203-ray-bradbury (https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6012/the-art-of-fiction-no-203-ray-bradbury)

Doing it now - looks like it will be 200 pages plus in soft cover paperback format. Still editing, adding a few photos, table of contents, preface, etc. We will see ....................
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dougfish on April 23, 2020, 20:23:19 PM
 'c;  'c;  'c;
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on April 24, 2020, 15:16:32 PM
What a story! Enjoyed this one. 🏕 🚎

#intothewild #alaska #alexandersupertramp #christophermccandless #

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 25, 2020, 08:25:48 AM
I read that after reading Into Thin Air!
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on April 25, 2020, 13:30:35 PM
Quote from: Al on April 23, 2020, 19:10:52 PM
Quote from: Dougfish on April 16, 2020, 13:37:24 PMDo it, Al !

I read a 2010 interview with Ray Bradbury. What a great storyteller. In the inerview, his last answer was remarkable. You could build a great novel off of that answer.
Now I want to go back and read everything he wrote.

https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6012/the-art-of-fiction-no-203-ray-bradbury (https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6012/the-art-of-fiction-no-203-ray-bradbury)

Doing it now - looks like it will be 200 pages plus in soft cover paperback format. Still editing, adding a few photos, table of contents, preface, etc. We will see ....................

Looking forward to it Al. Good luck with it.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on June 09, 2020, 19:31:20 PM
900+ pages of rambling nonsense. Not quite sure why I didn't throw it in the recycle bin weeks ago.
One good paragraph about bugs having sex.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Onslow on June 09, 2020, 19:47:01 PM
Quote from: troutrus on June 09, 2020, 19:31:20 PM900+ pages of rambling nonsense. Not quite sure why I didn't throw it in the recycle bin weeks ago.
One good paragraph about bugs having sex.

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Worse than Moby Dick?
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on June 09, 2020, 20:07:57 PM
Quote from: Onslow on June 09, 2020, 19:47:01 PM
Quote from: troutrus on June 09, 2020, 19:31:20 PM900+ pages of rambling nonsense. Not quite sure why I didn't throw it in the recycle bin weeks ago.
One good paragraph about bugs having sex.

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Worse than Moby Dick?

Not sure. Read Moby back when I was young, and I don't recall some things from that time period. 😳
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on June 10, 2020, 07:33:56 AM
I liked Moby Dick..... p;-
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on June 11, 2020, 12:22:51 PM
If ya liked old Moby, and ya hadn't tried this, you might like it. A much more relaxing read.
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on June 11, 2020, 15:45:13 PM
This was possibly the most thought provoking book I've ever read.

"After awhile you could get used to anything."
― Albert Camus, The Stranger
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on June 12, 2020, 07:34:02 AM
Quote from: troutrus on June 11, 2020, 12:22:51 PMIf ya liked old Moby, and ya hadn't tried this, you might like it. A much more relaxing read.
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Quote from: troutrus on June 11, 2020, 15:45:13 PMThis was possibly the most thought provoking book I've ever read.

"After awhile you could get used to anything."
― Albert Camus, The Stranger
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Will look into these. Suggestions are always appreciated.  :cheers
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on June 17, 2020, 14:49:44 PM
Glad this was short, 'cause turning each page gave me a good idea of how Sisyphus must feel. 👎
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Dee-Vo on June 18, 2020, 20:25:06 PM
Such a great book! A light-hearted story that will have you laughing out loud, literally. Loved this!

There's no doubt that I'll be picking up more of Harrison's work!

A book that will make you want to walk into the woods with a sandwich and a fly rod, and forget the complications of this world. A simple life? Wouldn't that be nice?

#jimharrison #browndog #bd #brooktrout

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on July 03, 2020, 03:38:47 AM
Received as a gift back in the eighties. Never read as I guess I was too busy fishing. Now I rarely fish so have more time to read.
Enjoyable and relaxing.
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https://amzn.to/3dYHJNG
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on July 04, 2020, 19:08:13 PM
Ens

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: driver on July 05, 2020, 08:41:18 AM
Quote from: troutrus on July 03, 2020, 03:38:47 AMReceived as a gift back in the eighties. Never read as I guess I was too busy fishing. Now I rarely fish so have more time to read.
Enjoyable and relaxing.
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https://amzn.to/3dYHJNG

I have not read this one. But have read others by him. Some are great some not so much.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on July 07, 2020, 19:48:16 PM
Interesting critters.
Almost unbelievable how many crabs were harvested in  "The Bay" back in the day.
One of my favorite past times in my younger years, and still enjoy picking a few now and then.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Al on July 08, 2020, 07:29:44 AM
It's not about fishing but this pandemic lock down is giving me time to catch up on books I've neglected over the years. Presently reading this classic by Robert Ruark. He has a way of putting words together that make reading his books "page turners".
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 13, 2020, 09:45:36 AM
So after my foray into the Library of Congress Digital collection (https://www.loc.gov/collections/edward-s-curtis/), I recalled this book about Edwards Curtis and his photography of the Native Americans, that I picked up at an airport on one of my last corporate trips to Calafornia. The photo of Three Horses is one of his photos.


https://youtu.be/czjvrXSoSaU

Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on July 14, 2020, 10:46:29 AM
Published 68 years ago and still pertinent today. Sad.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on July 20, 2020, 14:53:41 PM
Classic classics. 19 short stories. And free for AP members.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on July 23, 2020, 17:14:51 PM
Well done!
Made me laugh, made me think, and made me cry.
Three things Jimmy V suggested doing everyday to help get through this life. Good advice in my opinion.

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on August 17, 2020, 15:26:35 PM
Enjoyable.
The gist of BD's philosophy sorta put me in the mind of Thoreau's Walden. Only 100 years later and BD was a tad rougher around the edges.
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on August 22, 2020, 19:06:51 PM
"Like a Dog"

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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on August 28, 2020, 17:13:54 PM
Enjoyed tremendously. Thanks to forum members that recommended.
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Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: greg on August 28, 2020, 20:08:38 PM
I've been on a Sean stranahan mystery kick. On book number 4. Started with the royal wulff murders. Easy reads that I have found enjoyable..
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on August 29, 2020, 07:51:33 AM
Quote from: Al on July 08, 2020, 07:29:44 AMIt's not about fishing but this pandemic lock down is giving me time to catch up on books I've neglected over the years. Presently reading this classic by Robert Ruark. He has a way of putting words together that make reading his books "page turners".
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I just got done re-reading Horn of the Hunter. Ruark was a good writer.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: Yallerhammer on August 29, 2020, 07:52:28 AM
Quote from: troutrus on July 20, 2020, 14:53:41 PMClassic classics. 19 short stories. And free for AP members.

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Poe has always been one of my favorites. I have his "Complete Works" on my shelf and re-read it at least once a year.
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: troutrus on September 06, 2020, 08:05:32 AM
"Beati Pacifici"

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https://amzn.to/2Z76S47
Title: Re: Beetle's Book and Word Thread
Post by: greg on September 06, 2020, 10:32:38 AM
I reread the earth is enough every year. For some reason usually in the fall. It's getting about time. Hell I named my English setter Albert.