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#1
Local Trip Reports / Re: Smith-Continued
Last post by Woolly Bugger - February 05, 2023, 10:27:42 AM

#23-9 32 - 37 clear skies

cold day, layered up, icy guides for a bit, swinging for unicorns, only one bump.

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just casting away from river right all afternoon, it's a low percentage game and I almost switched to a euro rig, but I was in a double spey casting groove.

#2
The Gravel Bar / Re: unlimited odds and ends
Last post by Woolly Bugger - February 03, 2023, 11:51:35 AM
Land-dwelling rats are upending life for coral reef fish
When rats invade tropical islands, they can trigger a chain reaction that reverberates all the way to coral reefs, researchers say

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The jewel damselfish spends its life underwater, tending to a small patch of algae, oblivious to anything outside its coral reef home.

But the tiny fish, like a marionette, is being pulled by a distant force it does not even know exists.

A rat invasion on isolated islands in the Indian Ocean has led to a remarkable ecological cascade that is upending life not just for the tiny fish, but for species across the coral reefs where it lives.

"It's disrupting the natural order," said Rachel L. Gunn, a coral reef fish ecologist and postdoctoral fellow at Germany's University of Tuebingen.

Around the world, coral reefs are under unprecedented threat. Plastic litter and other pollution are choking fish. Overfishing is shrinking the population of sharks and other endangered animals.

And most alarmingly of all, acidifying waters and rising ocean temperatures are conspiring to dissolve and bleach the vibrant corals that sustain these ecosystems. A leading scientific body, the U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, warns if Earth warms much more than 2 degrees Celsius, coral reefs will virtually disappear.

Now add rats to that mess.


https://wapo.st/3JIsOKS
#3
The Gravel Bar / Re: Asking for a friend
Last post by streamereater_101691 - February 03, 2023, 09:23:05 AM
69 sleeves. Frozen of course.
#4
The Gravel Bar / Re: Asking for a friend
Last post by driver - February 03, 2023, 08:50:20 AM
Use as directed, 2 every 4-6 hours. Do not eat more than 8 in 24 hours.
#5
The Gravel Bar / Re: Asking for a friend
Last post by Dougfish - February 03, 2023, 08:31:35 AM
Samoas(Caramel Delites) have a lower LD50. :Dance
#6
The Gravel Bar / Re: Asking for a friend
Last post by greg - February 03, 2023, 06:58:59 AM
Not sure about the thin mints but I will do my best to find the limit on tagalongs.
#7
The Gravel Bar / Asking for a friend
Last post by Woolly Bugger - February 02, 2023, 21:21:34 PM
what is the lethal dose of Girl Scout thin mint cookies?
#8
The Gravel Bar / Re: unlimited it's the water, ...
Last post by Woolly Bugger - February 01, 2023, 13:14:38 PM
The river's end: Amid Colorado water cuts, Mexico seeks to restore its lost oasis

When the Colorado River reaches the U.S.-Mexico border, it pushes up against Morelos Dam. Nearly all the remaining water is shunted aside into an immense canal and flows toward the farmlands and cities of Baja California.
South of the dam, the last of the river disappears in the desert.

The sandy riverbed meanders on through fields of wheat, hay, cotton and vegetables, and curves past the town of San Luis Rio Colorado, where for years little or no water has flowed beneath its bridge.

Mexico is entitled to receive 1.5 million acre-feet of water per year under a 1944 treaty. But in recent agreements with the U.S., Mexico has also agreed to take part in reductions when there is a shortage.

https://www.latimes.com/environment/story/2023-01-31/colorado-river-in-crisis-the-rivers-end
#9
The Gravel Bar / Re: unlimited it's the water, ...
Last post by Woolly Bugger - February 01, 2023, 12:02:46 PM
New York investors snapping up Colorado River water rights, betting big on an increasingly scarce resource


https://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-york-investors-snapping-up-colorado-river-water-rights-betting-big-on-an-increasingly-scarce-resource/ via @CBSMornings
#10
The Gravel Bar / Re: unlimited it's the water, ...
Last post by Woolly Bugger - February 01, 2023, 11:26:08 AM
How Colorado River Cuts Could Affect California
No other state gets more water from the dwindling river than California does.

The Colorado River, a significant source of water for California and six other Western states, is shrinking.

Over the past century, the river's flow has averaged about 15 million acre-feet of water a year. But from 2000 through 2022, a period of drought conditions, the average was closer to 12 million acre-feet. And in each of the past three years, it's been less than 10 million. (An acre-foot is enough to cover an acre of land with a foot of water. It's about as much water as two typical households use in a year.)

The reduced flow in the river has forced major cutbacks for the states that rely on the river to supply water to as many as 40 million residents of the region. The Interior Department had asked those states — California, Nevada, Arizona, Wyoming, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah — to come up with a plan by today to collectively reduce the amount of water they draw from the Colorado. But the odds of such an agreement materializing appear slim, my colleague Christopher Flavelle reports.

The states all have a lot to lose. Water from the Colorado River is essential for drinking water in cities and farm irrigation in the countryside. The stakes are particularly high in California, which currently receives more water from the Colorado than any other state.


Read More at the NYT[/url
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