Pretentious Snobby Bastard Fly Fishing!

Fly Fishing BS => The Gravel Bar => Topic started by: Woolly Bugger on March 04, 2019, 12:37:47 PM

Title: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 04, 2019, 12:37:47 PM
It's going to be all about the water, sooner than later.


https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/local-nevada/a-future-no-one-could-see-capped-nevadas-share-of-colorado-river-water-1603391/

QuoteWhen representatives from seven Western states met in Santa Fe, New Mexico, to divvy up the Colorado River in 1922, Las Vegas was a dusty railroad stop with fewer than 2,500 residents.
No one could have imagined this isolated desert community would one day become an international destination with more than 2 million residents and 40 million annual visitors.
No one thought Nevada would ever need more water than it eventually got from those early Colorado River negotiations.

“It strikes me as a forgivable failure of imagination,” said historian Christian Harrison, who earned his doctorate from UNLV. “They probably thought they would land people on Mars before we had so many people living in this valley.”

QuoteWhen construction of Hoover Dam began in 1931, fewer than 100,000 people lived in Nevada, and most of them were in the northern half of the state, far beyond the river’s reach. Clark County, population 8,500, was home to some mines, a few modest farming operations and a newly legal gaming industry, but nothing that seemed to require a major new source of water or the means of delivering it.

Current estimated population 2.2 Million in Clark County 3.1 Million for the state.

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 04, 2019, 12:46:29 PM
Colorado River’s decline poses long-term risks for Southern Nevada


QuoteIt supplies water and power to 40 million people from Wyoming to Mexico and irrigates billions of dollars in cropland used to feed millions more.
No wonder so many people are worried about the Colorado River. Punishing drought has ravaged the system for almost 20 years, shrinking its two largest reservoirs to a record low 40 percent of combined capacity.

A bleached bathtub ring 130 feet tall marks the decline of Lake Mead, which supplies 90 percent of the water used by nearly three-quarters of Nevada residents. That white stripe on the
cliffs surrounding the nation’s largest reservoir is expected to grow another 30 feet over the next two years as farms and cities downstream continue to divert more water than the Colorado can reliably provide.

https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/local-nevada/colorado-rivers-decline-poses-long-term-risks-for-southern-nevada-1603454/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 08, 2019, 05:11:17 AM
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/03/india-diverting-30-rivers-to-solve-historic-water-crisis/

QuoteIndia today faces a water emergency of historic proportions, with an estimated 600 million peopleâ€"about half the populationâ€"grappling with either severe water shortages or polluted water supplies. Government engineers propose to ease the crisis by shunting “excess” water from one riverbed to another, a colossal refit of nature’s designs that also could help control monsoon flooding, boost irrigation, and generate hydropower for the country’s water-thirsty citizens.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Onslow on March 08, 2019, 06:43:57 AM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on March 08, 2019, 05:11:17 AMhttps://www.nationalgeographic.com/environment/2019/03/india-diverting-30-rivers-to-solve-historic-water-crisis/

QuoteIndia today faces a water emergency of historic proportions, with an estimated 600 million peopleâ€"about half the populationâ€"grappling with either severe water shortages or polluted water supplies. Government engineers propose to ease the crisis by shunting “excess” water from one riverbed to another, a colossal refit of nature’s designs that also could help control monsoon flooding, boost irrigation, and generate hydropower for the country’s water-thirsty citizens.

Why, so they can double their population in the next 30 years, and export another 500,000,000 to Europe and the US? They don't have a water problem, they have a population management problem!
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 08, 2019, 08:08:27 AM
Quote from: Onslow on March 08, 2019, 06:43:57 AMWhy, so they can double their population in the next 30 years, and export another 500,000,000 to Europe and the US? They don't have a water problem, they have a population management problem!


Corrected: “They don't have a water problem, we have a population management problem!

From my colonized county of 4500 souls, I say, insular reasoning will get us nowhere

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/matthieu-ricard/we-are-all-responsible_b_8201790.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on March 08, 2019, 08:33:37 AM
Man, that scenario would be about as crazy as saying someone could lay pipes through mountains and other obstacles to move water to New York City. Or, we could rob headwaters of a river that flows southwest to the Pacific and pipe it east over the western continental divide so people in Denver can water their lawns.
Dang, we would never be so stupid as to do that!
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 09, 2019, 14:16:21 PM
Plans to pump the Mojave desert aquafer dry in order to supplement water need of Los Angeles!


QuoteCADIZ VALLEY, Calif. â€" The landscape here is more Martian than Earthly, rust and tan plains that rise in the distance to form the Old Woman Mountains to the east and the Bristols and Marbles to the north and west.
Almost everything here is protected by the federal government. The opportunity or threat, depending on your point of view, lies beneath the dusty surface that, after a recent rain, blooms with sprays of yellow desert dandelion.
There is water here in the Mojave Desert. A lot of it.
Whether to tap it on a commercial scale or leave it alone is a decades-old question the Trump administration has revived and the California legislature is visiting anew. The debate will help resolve whether private enterprise can effectively manage a public necessity in a state where who gets water and where it originates endures as the most volatile political issue.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/a-massive-aquifer-lies-beneath-the-mojave-desert-could-it-help-solve-californias-water-problem/2019/03/03/a5d8fe14-354e-11e9-af5b-b51b7ff322e9_story.html?utm_term=.b2f658a3b04e
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on March 09, 2019, 16:22:32 PM
I saw an ad for miracle water from this prophet last week on late night TV.  His "Biblical point of contact" H2O might just save the world from total annihilation.

https://peterpopoff.org/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 13, 2019, 12:04:33 PM
Quote from: undefinedPHOENIX â€" A major Southern California water agency is trying to push the state through a final hurdle in joining a larger plan to preserve a key river in the U.S. West that serves 40 million people.
Most of the seven states that get water from the Colorado River have signed off on plans to keep the waterway from crashing amid a prolonged drought, climate change and increased demands. But California and Arizona have not, missing deadlines from the federal government.

Arizona has some work to do but nothing major holding it back. California, however, has two powerful water agencies fighting over how to get the drought contingency plan approved before U.S. officials possibly impose their own rules for water going to California, Arizona and Nevada.

QuoteThat agency, the Imperial Irrigation District, has said it won't approve the plan unless the federal government agrees to commit $200 million to address the Salton Sea, a massive, briny lake southeast of Los Angeles that has become an environmental and health hazard in the Imperial and Coachella valleys
.

wait, CA needs Federal money...


https://www.abc15.com/news/state/california-agencies-at-odds-over-colorado-river-drought-plan
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 16, 2019, 13:19:46 PM
QuoteFor the moment, Mother Nature is smiling on the Colorado River.
Enough snow has piled up in the mountains that feed the river to stave off a dreaded shortage declaration for one more year, according to federal projections released Friday afternoon.

Just a month ago, forecasters expected Lake Mead to start 2020 about 17 feet lower than it is now, below the trigger point for a first-ever federal shortage declaration on the drought-stricken river.

But several weeks of winter storms across the Mountain States have cut the lake’s expected decline by Jan. 1 roughly in half, leaving the reservoir east of Las Vegas safely above the shortage line, according to the new figures from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation.

QuoteIn January, they were predicting another dry year, with just 64 percent of the average flow during the river’s peak April through July snowmelt period. By mid-February, that runoff forecast had increased to 74 percent. It hit 102 percent in the Bureau of Reclamation’s latest batch of monthly projections, and Miller said it could climb as high as 130 percent a month from now.

If the latest forecast holds, it would mark just the sixth year of above average flows since 2000 for the river system that supplies 90 percent of the Las Vegas Valley’s drinking water.

“It’s been a much better year than last year. It’s still not enough to break the drought, but it’s certainly a step in the right direction,” Miller said. “My guess is it will get even better. I’m not sure if it will be enough to keep Lake Mead out of shortage.”

https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/local-nevada/wet-winter-likely-to-keep-colorado-river-out-of-shortage-next-year-1619331/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 18, 2019, 15:55:57 PM
Regional snowmaking expansions a growing concern


An environmental group is raising concerns that the cumulative impacts of numerous snowmaking expansion projects proposed or underway at ski areas throughout the region are not being adequately evaluated by the U.S. Forest Service.

Snowmaking is both a cause of and a response to climate change, Wilderness Workshop argues in an objection filed in response to the White River National Forest’s approval of Aspen Skiing Co.’s project to expand snowmaking and terrain on Aspen Mountain.

The Carbondale-based nonprofit’s objection requested the Forest Service withdraw its November decision in support of the Aspen Mountain project so that a “programmatic environmental impact statement” (EIS) can be drafted looking at the bigger picture. The objection focuses on impacts of increased river depletions to endangered fish in the Colorado River, changes to runoff patterns and increased energy use associated with the system expansions.

https://www.aspendailynews.com/news/regional-snowmaking-expansions-a-growing-concern/article_ffc1a42c-492f-11e9-a5ec-af32490855b3.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 25, 2019, 18:41:36 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/25/california-water-drought-scarce-saudi-arabia

Saudi-based Almarai owns 15,000 acres of an irrigated valley â€" but what business does a foreign food production company have drawing resources from a US desert?

Four hours east of Los Angeles, in a drought-stricken area of a drought-afflicted state, is a small town called Blythe where alfalfa is king. More than half of the town’s 94,000 acres are bushy blue-green fields growing the crop.

Massive industrial storehouses line the southern end of town, packed with thousands upon thousands of stacks of alfalfa bales ready to be fed to dairy cows â€" but not cows in California’s Central Valley or Montana’s rangelands.

Instead, the alfalfa will be fed to cows in Saudi Arabia.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 25, 2019, 18:48:18 PM
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kalw/audio/2019/03/03-25-19yc.mp3

One Planet: Climate change and the Colorado River Podcast
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on March 25, 2019, 18:52:33 PM
Quotehttps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/25/california-water-drought-scarce-saudi-arabia

Saudi-based Almarai owns 15,000 acres of an irrigated valley â€" but what business does a foreign food production company have drawing resources from a US desert?

Four hours east of Los Angeles, in a drought-stricken area of a drought-afflicted state, is a small town called Blythe where alfalfa is king. More than half of the town’s 94,000 acres are bushy blue-green fields growing the crop.

Massive industrial storehouses line the southern end of town, packed with thousands upon thousands of stacks of alfalfa bales ready to be fed to dairy cows â€" but not cows in California’s Central Valley or Montana’s rangelands.

Instead, the alfalfa will be fed to cows in Saudi Arabia.
This is the kind of shit that makes me crazy.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: rbphoto on March 26, 2019, 14:34:35 PM
Quote from: Dougfish on March 25, 2019, 18:52:33 PM
Quotehttps://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2019/mar/25/california-water-drought-scarce-saudi-arabia

Saudi-based Almarai owns 15,000 acres of an irrigated valley â€" but what business does a foreign food production company have drawing resources from a US desert?

Four hours east of Los Angeles, in a drought-stricken area of a drought-afflicted state, is a small town called Blythe where alfalfa is king. More than half of the town’s 94,000 acres are bushy blue-green fields growing the crop.

Massive industrial storehouses line the southern end of town, packed with thousands upon thousands of stacks of alfalfa bales ready to be fed to dairy cows â€" but not cows in California’s Central Valley or Montana’s rangelands.

Instead, the alfalfa will be fed to cows in Saudi Arabia.
This is the kind of shit that makes me crazy.

There is a ton of money in the Middle East, and they don't mind spending it.  They just do it in ways that most of us don't think about.

My brother-in-law flies over there a few times a year as a dairy consultant.  He attempted to broker some U.S. based feed deals to supply them since they can't grow what they need over there. 

Your example above is exactly they mindset they have about how to supply their needs.

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 06, 2019, 17:58:43 PM
https://www.gjsentinel.com/news/western_colorado/where-the-rivers-join/article_f0f2809c-582a-11e9-bd02-20677ce85d90.html

Brian Mahoney has been eyeing public access for properties along the Colorado riverfront since 1986, but he's always had his sights set on an elusive, high-rising parcel that just happens to include the junction of the Colorado and Gunnison rivers.

There have been notable overtures by Mahoney and others in the past to buy the property — owned for years by salvage yard operator Dean Van Gundy, and now owned by his son Randy — but a confluence of factors may be stirring together now to make some sort of sale of the property a reality.

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Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 09, 2019, 16:34:52 PM
In Colorado River's Final Hundred Miles, Small Signs Of Life Return

QuoteLAGUNA GRANDE, BAJA CALIFORNIA, MEXICO — It's mid-morning in the Sonoran desert and already the temperature is rising.
Karen Schlatter suggests we find some shade, a relatively easy task at Laguna Grande, a restoration site along the Colorado River's historic channel in Mexico. It's managed by the Sonoran Institute, where Schlatter is associate director of the binational environmental group's Colorado River Delta program.

Read the rest:
https://www.kunc.org/post/colorado-rivers-final-hundred-miles-small-signs-life-return#stream/1

or listen:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kunc/audio/2019/04/lr_deltaseries3_web.mp3

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 09, 2019, 16:57:24 PM
As The Colorado River Basin Dries, Can An Accidental Oasis Survive?

QuoteJuan Butrón-Méndez navigates a small metal motorboat through a maze of tall reeds here in the Mexican state of Sonora. It's nearing sunset, and the sky is turning shades of light blue and purple.
The air smells of wet earth, an unfamiliar scent in the desert.
 

Luke Runyon reports from the Colorado River's "accidental wetland." Butrón-Méndez lives nearby and works for the conservation group Pronatura Noroeste as a bird monitor. (Pronatura's work receives financial support from the Walton Family Foundation, which also funds KUNC's Colorado River coverage.)

Read the rest: https://www.kunc.org/post/colorado-river-basin-dries-can-accidental-oasis-survive#stream/1

or listen: https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kunc/audio/2019/04/lr_deltaseries2_web.mp3

associated reading: A Sand County Almanac (https://amzn.to/2I7jPE5)
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 09, 2019, 17:35:00 PM
Five Years Later, Effects Of Colorado River Pulse Flow Still Linger

QuoteAN LUIS RIO COLORADO, MEXICO — From inside a small airplane, tracing the Colorado River along the Arizona-California border, it's easy to see how it happened.
As the river bends and weaves through the American Southwest, its contents are slowly drained. Concrete canals send water to millions of people in Phoenix and Tucson, Los Angeles and San Diego. Farms, ribbons of green contrasted against the desert's shades of brown, line the waterway.

Further downstream, near Yuma, Arizona, the river splits into threads, like a frayed piece of yarn.

read the rest: https://www.kunc.org/post/five-years-later-effects-colorado-river-pulse-flow-still-linger#stream/1

or listen: https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kunc/audio/2019/04/lr_deltaseries1_web.mp3

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 06, 2019, 14:45:17 PM
Changing water flow leads to more bugs in the Grand Canyon

QuoteLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Ted Kennedy sums up what he sees along the river in the Grand Canyon: "It's buggy out there."
That is to say, an experiment to change the flow of water from a dam near the Arizona-Utah state line appeared to boost the number of aquatic insects that fish in the Colorado River eat.
 
Scientists are hoping to better understand those results with a second bug flow experiment that started this month and will run through August. They found that releasing low, steady flows of water from Glen Canyon Dam over the weekend gives the eggs that bugs lay on rocks, wood or cattails just below the water's surface a better chance of survival. Otherwise, they might dry out and die within an hour.

"It's a powerful reminder that flows really matter, that just a couple days a week of steady flow can illicit massive emergence," said Kennedy, a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.

https://www.bendbulletin.com/nation/7137813-151/changing-water-flow-leads-to-more-bugs-in
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 06, 2019, 14:53:08 PM
50 years of restoring Donegal Creek wild trout stream heartbreakingly undone in hours


QuoteNature is a great healer. It also can be achingly fragile, as fly fishers who love Donegal Creek in East Donegal Township found out last weekend.

One minute, the spring-fed stream that has been lovingly restored into a wild trout stream over five decades was flowing peacefully through rolling Lancaster County farmland. Then something toxic came barreling downstream near the stream's confluence with Musser Run, wiping out, within hours, nearly every kind of fish, crayfish and aquatic insect along a 4.5-mile stretch.

On Sunday, when fly anglers who had caught rising trout only days before drove over to see the damage for themselves, they were dumbstruck and broken-hearted by what they saw. Wild and stocked trout, their beautiful stripes and colorful specks already bleached from their bodies, lay on sandy banks or bobbed in unnatural positions in the water. The carnage also included sculpin, dace, chubs, minnows, salamanders and all manner of aquatic insects.

https://lancasteronline.com/sports/outdoors/years-of-restoring-donegal-creek-wild-trout-stream-heartbreakingly-undone/article_2949e584-6d07-11e9-ace1-0bd7f7e295e0.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on May 06, 2019, 16:27:22 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on May 06, 2019, 14:45:17 PMChanging water flow leads to more bugs in the Grand Canyon

QuoteLAGSTAFF, Ariz. — Ted Kennedy sums up what he sees along the river in the Grand Canyon: "It's buggy out there."
That is to say, an experiment to change the flow of water from a dam near the Arizona-Utah state line appeared to boost the number of aquatic insects that fish in the Colorado River eat.
 
Scientists are hoping to better understand those results with a second bug flow experiment that started this month and will run through August. They found that releasing low, steady flows of water from Glen Canyon Dam over the weekend gives the eggs that bugs lay on rocks, wood or cattails just below the water's surface a better chance of survival. Otherwise, they might dry out and die within an hour.

"It's a powerful reminder that flows really matter, that just a couple days a week of steady flow can illicit massive emergence," said Kennedy, a research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.

https://www.bendbulletin.com/nation/7137813-151/changing-water-flow-leads-to-more-bugs-in

Hmmm. Sounds like the Smiff.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 14, 2019, 16:14:02 PM
https://www.nrdc.org/media/2019/190514

Fishing and Conservation Groups Sue Country's Largest Agricultural Water District Over Illegal Plot to Raise Shasta Dam

Dam Raise Would Flood the Protected Wild and scenic McCloud River, Tribe's Remaining Sacred Sites and Harm Fisheries
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 22, 2019, 10:22:59 AM
https://www.capeandislands.org/post/trout-mill-brook-indicator-struggling-ecosystem

The Mill Brook in West Tisbury on Martha's Vineyard used to run "thick with fish," but that's no longer the case. As its waters warm from pollution and climate change, the trout, which require cool water temperatures, are becoming less and less numerous. Environmentalists say the trout are indicator of a challenged ecosystem.


Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 03, 2019, 13:30:11 PM
John Wesley Powell First Descended the Grand Canyon 150 Years Ago, Here's How It's Changed Since

QuoteThe completion of the Glen Canyon Dam upstream of the Grand Canyon in 1963 resulted in reverberating changes to the canyon's water and sediment flows. These changes have altered the evolution and morphology, or the physical shape, of the Colorado River, along with the surrounding landscapes and the living things that evolved along the riverway.

Well-documented changes to the river system include variation in water temperature, the timing and duration of flood events and lack of replenishing sediment, all resulting from the regulated releases of cold, sediment-free water from Lake Powell.


https://www.brfff.com/forum/index.php?action=post;topic=15529.0;last_msg=162294
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 08, 2019, 12:02:54 PM
I never really enjoyed the beach, any beach.  It is a flatland/salt/sand thing, but these photos are alarming. 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/heres-what-pollution-has-done-to-these-once-pristine-beaches/ss-AACFl4u?ocid=spartandhp
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 08, 2019, 12:24:30 PM
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 08, 2019, 12:02:54 PMI never really enjoyed the beach, any beach.  It is a flatland/salt/sand thing, but these photos are alarming. 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/heres-what-pollution-has-done-to-these-once-pristine-beaches/ss-AACFl4u?ocid=spartandhp


yup we're shitting plastic all over the world at an alarming rate... try and buy anything without excess plastic packaging... but i read recently that Pepsi will be canning water to reduce reliance on plasti bottles...
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 09, 2019, 12:28:35 PM

Environment Report: The Earthquake Risk No One's Talking About
A quake, even one so far away that nobody in San Diego feels it, could cause an emergency and force mandatory water-use restrictions.


QuoteIn one worst-case scenario identified by the system's operator, the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, a tunnel near Palm Springs would collapse during a quake and cut off flows for six months.

https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/science-environment/environment-report-the-earthquake-risk-no-ones-talking-about/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 21, 2019, 12:21:54 PM
Battlefields part of drinking water protection effort


QuoteAbout two miles from the heart of Shepherdstown is the site of the bloodiest battle in West Virginia during the American Civil War. More than 600 Union and Confederate soldiers died in a two-day battle in September 1862.

The Battle of Shepherdstown may have been small in comparison to other battles of the Civil War, but historians agree, the battle not only halted the Confederates' northern invasion, but it also opened the door for President Abraham Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

Since 2011, the site of the Battle of Shepherdstown has been a protected historic landmark. The battle site also happens to be at a unique location — along the Potomac River. The Potomac provides drinking water to Shepherdstown residents, and other nearby areas.

https://www.wral.com/battlefields-part-of-drinking-water-protection-effort/18518550/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 21, 2019, 16:39:41 PM
https://kutv.com/news/local/51-foot-difference-in-water-level-at-lake-powell-from-increased-runoff-in-last-3-months

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Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on July 21, 2019, 19:49:36 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on July 21, 2019, 12:21:54 PMBattlefields part of drinking water protection effort


QuoteAbout two miles from the heart of Shepherdstown is the site of the bloodiest battle in West Virginia during the American Civil War. More than 600 Union and Confederate soldiers died in a two-day battle in September 1862.

The Battle of Shepherdstown may have been small in comparison to other battles of the Civil War, but historians agree, the battle not only halted the Confederates' northern invasion, but it also opened the door for President Abraham Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

Since 2011, the site of the Battle of Shepherdstown has been a protected historic landmark. The battle site also happens to be at a unique location — along the Potomac River. The Potomac provides drinking water to Shepherdstown residents, and other nearby areas.

https://www.wral.com/battlefields-part-of-drinking-water-protection-effort/18518550/

Sharpsburg/Antietum is just across the river. Real bloodshed.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 24, 2019, 10:53:07 AM
The Murder and Resurrection of the Colorado River, Part One - Six

https://pagosadailypost.com/2019/10/15/editorial-the-murder-and-resurrection-of-the-colorado-river-part-one/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 02, 2019, 13:14:27 PM
Controversial Pesticides Are Suspected Of Starving Fish

https://www.wfdd.org/story/controversial-pesticides-are-suspected-starving-fish
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Onslow on November 02, 2019, 13:48:20 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on November 02, 2019, 13:14:27 PMControversial Pesticides Are Suspected Of Starving Fish

https://www.wfdd.org/story/controversial-pesticides-are-suspected-starving-fish

Many people do not understand the secondary impacts of herbicides on insects.  It may not be the chemicals that are diminishing the populations.  I'm of the opinion removing various varieties of vegetation diminish the nectar, resins, and pollen, insects need to survive.  Insects need a continuous flow of food throughout the course of the active season.  Once cannot expect a human to live off of mac and cheese for 6 months, and starve the remaining six months....and this is what some insects are having to contend with in heavy ag areas down east.

That being said, no till farming has been a boon for my bees.  Fields around my bee yard are covered with chickweed, deadnettle, and gillflower during the Winter months.  When the fields are sprayed, other sources of nectar such as poplars, apple trees, and clover, and hedge are available.  That being said, the latter are becoming less available due to deforestation and field sanitizing.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 04, 2019, 13:36:14 PM
 n!n

SEATTLE -- In a report released this week, a national group highlighted Chinook salmon as one of the top 10 species imperiled by pesticides.
The Endangered Species Coalition released its 2019 report, Poisoned by Pesticides, which included Chinook salmon. The report said pesticides sprayed nearby reach rivers and enter salmon streams through contaminated runoff, killing salmon prey and impacting salmon's ability to swim and evade predators.
The report also linked the toxic salmon to the critically-endangered southern resident orcas, which primarily rely on fatty Chinook salmon to survive and are impacted by toxins when the whales are nutritionally deficient and access fat storage, where toxins are also stored.

https://q13fox.com/2019/11/01/national-group-says-pesticides-poisoning-pacific-northwest-salmon/

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on November 04, 2019, 16:15:52 PM
Humans suck.  n!n  :;!  p;-
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 18, 2019, 14:38:31 PM
QuoteThe Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Monday is expected to rule on a company's request to pursue a permit to build two hydroelectric dams on the Little Colorado River not far upstream from the main Colorado River as it flows into Grand Canyon National Park.
The plan envisioned by Pumped Hydro Storage, LLC, of Phoenix, is to construct one dam rising 240 feet above the Little Colorado and another 140 feet high. The proposed Navajo National Salt Trail Canyon Pumped Storage Project would also include six 250-megawatt, turbine-generator units, for a total installed capacity of 1,500 megawatts, a 20-mile-long, 500-kilovolt transmission line from the powerhouse to the existing Moenkopi switchyard, and related facilities.
At peak capacity, such a setup would have an average annual generation of 3,300 gigawatt-hours, according to FERC.
The current filing, if approved by FERC, would not allow the company to begin construction. Rather, it would "grant the permit holder priority to file a license application during the permit term."
Opponents fear that if the project is eventually approved, it would harm the endangered humpback chub and most definitely disrupt the ecosystem within Grand Canyon National Park.

https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/2019/11/dams-proposed-little-colorado-river-upstream-grand-canyon-national-park

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 03, 2019, 16:26:55 PM
New book out on the history of the Colorado water rights mismanagement!
https://amzn.to/2rUUxly



Politicians knew the inconvenient truth about the Colorado River 100 years ago — and ignored it


QuoteEarlier this year, the seven states that depend on the Colorado River made history. For the first time, Arizona, California, Utah, Nevada, Wyoming, Colorado, and New Mexico agreed to find ways to reduce the amount of water they draw from the river as levels drop further at Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the country.
The Colorado River provides water for 40 million people. But its flows are shrinking as the planet heats up, reducing the snowpack that feeds the river and causing more water to evaporate as the river snakes its way from the Rocky Mountains to the Gulf of California.

But even if climate change weren't an issue, the Colorado would probably still be in trouble. Back in 1922, when states originally divvied up water from the river, they grossly overestimated the amount of water flowing through it. This set in motion a series of decisions that led to the shortages today. States are dipping into Lake Mead's reserves, overdrawing 1.2 million acre feet of water annually — enough to quench the thirst of a couple million households for a year.

https://grist.org/climate/politicians-knew-the-inconvenient-truth-about-the-colorado-river-100-years-ago-and-ignored-it/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on December 07, 2019, 18:06:15 PM
read the full story  (https://therevelator.org/edwards-dam-removal/?fbclid=IwAR0hlGIYj5Jv83J0yl1Dd_2U-TjYPSlKDaMZU-s2IRiHogxOhPaBFckDlFY&utm_campaign=coschedule&utm_source=facebook_page&utm_medium=American%20Rivers&utm_content=How%20Removing%20One%20Maine%20Dam%2020%20Years%20Ago%20Changed%20Everything%20%E2%80%A2%20The%20Revelato)

How Removing One Maine Dam 20 Years Ago Changed Everything


Welcome to the first edition of "Turning Points," our new column examining critical moments in environmental history when change occurred for the better — or worse.

More than 1,000 people lined the banks of the Kennebec River in Augusta, Maine, on July 1, 1999. They were there to witness a rebirth.

The ringing of a bell signaled a backhoe on the opposite bank to dig into a retaining wall. Water trickled, then gushed. The crowd erupted in cheers as the Edwards Dam, which had stretched 900 feet across the river, was breached. Soon the whole dam would be removed.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on January 20, 2020, 19:08:39 PM
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/2020/01/mayfly-insect-populations-in-decline/


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Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 16, 2020, 12:18:27 PM
https://www.nationalparkstraveler.org/podcast/2020-02-16-national-parks-traveler-episode-53-special-report-colorado-river-grand-portage-nm
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 25, 2020, 11:29:47 AM
This dam is damned



Key California reservoir to be drained due to earthquake risk

https://www.bakersfield.com/ap/national/key-california-reservoir-to-be-drained-due-to-earthquake-risk/article_24654552-0272-5057-80bf-033b1d3f7099.html

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 29, 2020, 11:29:35 AM
For first time in 20 years, feds take deep look at hydroelectric dam removal on Lower Snake River


QuoteThe futures of hydropower, salmon and orcas in the Pacific Northwest are at stake in the first assessment in 20 years of the environmental effects of dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers.

Federal agencies are set to release a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) of dam operations on Friday, opening a 45-day public comment period. On the table will be a range of alternatives for operation of 14 dams in the federal Columbia River hydropower system, including a preferred alternative.

The review was required by a federal judge in 2016, and must, among other things, assess dam removal on the Lower Snake.
It's the first new look at river operations across the entire Columbia Basin since new challenges have emerged for endangered species and the region's power grid.

A warming climate has made both ocean conditions and the freshwater river environment tougher for salmon. Another endangered species has also been listed since the last EIS: the endangered southern resident orcas that frequent Puget Sound.


https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/for-first-time-in-20-years-feds-take-deep-look-at-hydrodam-removal-on-lower-snake-river/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 24, 2020, 09:35:07 AM
World Water Day: 11 Rivers Facing a Danger of Drying Up in America
These 11 rivers in the United States are at risk of drying up very soon.

https://interestingengineering.com/world-water-day-11-rivers-facing-a-danger-of-drying-up-in-america
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 29, 2020, 12:43:33 PM
https://www.eenews.net/stories/1062829919

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Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 04, 2020, 11:40:41 AM
Battle Over Pebble Mine About to Hit a Turning Point

The world's most controversial mine is up for a significant permit. Here's why critics say they shouldn't get it and what you can do about it

https://www.fieldandstream.com/story/fishing/battle-over-pebble-mine-hitting-a-major-turning-point/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 08, 2020, 12:37:36 PM
WORLD OCEAN DAY: ALTERNATIVE SEAFOOD OFFERS TWIN SOLUTION TO ADDRESS FOOD SECURITY, PLANET'S HEALTH

>>>Northern Harvest Sea Farms is a Canadian division of the Norwegian salmon fishing giant Mowi. In October 2019, Northern Harvest made a shocking announcement. A month earlier, they had lost 2.6 million Atlantic salmon – about 5000 metric tonnes – from their aquaculture operations on the coast of Canada. The fish had died due to a few weeks of excessively warm waters in early September. After a month of cleaning up dead fish in Fortune Bay, contracting a large number of divers and vessels to assist, the Managing Director of the company said they had finished 87 percent of the task – "The salmon mortalities comprise approximately half of all Northern Harvest fish in the water." Half of the entire company's inventory – gone.


https://www.firstpost.com/tech/science/world-ocean-day-alternative-seafood-offers-twin-solution-to-address-food-security-planets-health-8460921.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 22, 2020, 16:58:18 PM
>>> The historic dam at the Ward's Mill along Watauga River near Sugar Grove is being removed this year.

"That is the plan," said Virginia Ward, adding that the future removal will be bittersweet.

"You know it will be okay to let it go. It will open the river and I believe that will be good ... but it's a bit sad, too. We have multiple emotions. Let's put it that way."


https://onthewatauga.com/news/ward-dam-on-watauga-river-in-sugar-grove-to-be-removed/

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 16, 2020, 17:23:18 PM
We now know how many billions of gallons of water Colorado will save by closing coal-fired power plants

By 2031 water use for coal-fired power plants in Colorado will drop to 3.7 billion gallons – a 68% reduction, according to the Energy and Policy Institute.

https://coloradosun.com/2020/07/16/water-saved-closing-coal-power-plants-colorado/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 17, 2020, 12:45:24 PM
Grays Creek in Surry County is now part of Virginia's Scenic Rivers Program.

https://m.smithfieldtimes.com/2020/07/16/grays-creek-named-state-scenic-river/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 17, 2020, 13:21:49 PM


>>> Sudan and Egypt have hit out at Ethiopia, which has started filling a reservoir behind a controversial new dam on the Blue Nile.
Satellite images show water backing up on the Grand Renaissance Dam and now Sudan has reported reduced water flow in its section of the Nile River. Both Sudan and Egypt are downstream and are worried the dam will reduce their access to water.
A deal between Ethiopia, Egypt and Sudan over the reservoir is proving elusive. Instead there's a fraught stand-off with national pride, regional power and economic development at stake.

Why can't Egypt and Ethiopia agree on the Nile dam? https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-53441396
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 24, 2020, 11:26:27 AM
Conditions 'pretty grim' for endangered fish locally due to falling river flows


>>>The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has begun asking for water releases from high-country reservoirs to boost water flows in the Colorado River upstream of the Gunnison River confluence and aid endangered fish, while being careful not to exhaust available water that may be needed for the species later in the year.

The agency is seeing what U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service hydrologist Don Anderson on Wednesday said are "quickly deteriorating flow conditions" on what's called the 15-Mile Reach of the river between the Gunnison confluence and where Grand Valley irrigation diversions occur upstream.

Speaking in a conference call with upstream reservoir operators, local irrigation officials and others who work to cooperatively manage Colorado River flow levels, he said flows in the stretch Wednesday were around 450 cubic feet per second. The longterm median flow at Palisade below where Grand Valley diversions occur is 1,780 cfs for July 23, according to U.S. Geological Survey streamflow data.


https://www.gjsentinel.com/news/western_colorado/conditions-pretty-grim-for-endangered-fish-locally-due-to-falling-river-flows/article_d5cdd57a-cc5d-11ea-8786-abca954679f1.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 27, 2020, 13:13:51 PM
'World's longest art gallery' makes Nine Mile Canyon unique

>>>The team of archaeologists and students who arrived in Utah from Harvard University's Peabody Museum in 1931 were familiar with the abundance of prehistoric ruins and images throughout the region. Even so, Nine Mile Canyon surprised them.

In field notes, Donald Scott, the leader of the expedition, described the canyon as "almost a continuous picture gallery."

Guide and photographer David Rust was a Utah native who had led archaeologists and others to ancient sites across much of the Colorado Plateau. But the extent of such sites in Nine Mile Canyon caused him to write several journal entries such as "ruins everywhere" and "ruins all around."

https://www.gjsentinel.com/news/western_colorado/world-s-longest-art-gallery-makes-nine-mile-canyon-unique/article_64b3cf4e-cddd-11ea-8481-9b0b803b0547.html

This is the book in the article

and a podcast too... APEX Hour at SUU Check it out here:

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on August 11, 2020, 08:12:54 AM
Ran across this yesterday while walking around Reynolda

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You cannot see attachments on this board.

http://www.crowdhydrology.com/


Professor Chris Lowry needed to collect information on stream levels in Western New York but didn't have enough funding for the traditional methods, so he turned to a more creative option: crowdsourcing. Guest host Linda Wertheimer speaks with him about his research and the future of crowdsourcing in scientific inquiries.

CRONKITENEWS · KUNC: The Colorado River Basin's worsening dryness in 5 numbers
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 06, 2021, 10:27:43 AM
A $5-billion water project could drill through Anza-Borrego park. Is it a pipe dream?

>>>It would be arguably the most ambitious public works project in San Diego history.

The envisioned pipeline would carry Colorado River water more than 130 miles from the Imperial Valley — through the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, tunneling under the Cuyamaca Mountains, and passing through the Cleveland National Forest — to eventually connect with a water-treatment plant in San Marcos.

An alternative route would run through the desert to the south, boring under Mt. Laguna before emptying into the San Vicente Reservoir in Lakeside.

Estimated cost: roughly $5 billion. New water delivered: None.



https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-02-05/water-pipeline-anza-borrego-desert-state-park
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 06, 2021, 10:30:01 AM
Utah to stake claims to Colorado River water

>>>Water is becoming a bigger issues as Utah continues to grow. Now, the Utah State Legislature is wading into the issue with a new bill that asserts the state's claims on the Colorado River.

"Water can be a pretty contentious issue and we just want to make sure we're really well prepared," House Speaker Brad Wilson, R-Kaysville, said in an interview with FOX 13.

House Bill 297 creates an authority to represent Utah's interests when it comes to the river, which supplies water to Utah and six surrounding states.

"It's designed protect our share of the water we negotiated 100 years ago," said Speaker Wilson.

Utah is only using 54% of the Colorado River water it is able to, he said. That is expected to change as the state continues to grow.

"As we grow, we would probably like to use more of that. But the other thing that's happening, which is here in the state we're doing much better on conservation. So the amount we're using isn't growing as the same rate of our population. That's a good thing. But we do need to protect the water rights we have," he told FOX 13.


>>>Zach Frankel with the Utah Rivers Council blasted the bill and said it was more about advancing the Lake Powell Pipeline project.

"This bill is not about water. This bill is about money. This bill is about special-interest politicking. It's about climate change denial. It's about limiting public government," he told the House Natural Resources committee.

https://www.fox13now.com/news/local-news/utah-to-stake-claims-to-colorado-river-water
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on February 06, 2021, 18:33:04 PM
Jeebus.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 07, 2021, 11:24:15 AM
Colorado River outlook darkens dramatically in new study


>>>In the gloomiest long-term forecast yet for the drought-stricken Colorado River, a new study warns that lower river basin states including Arizona may have to slash their take from the river up to 40% by the 2050s to keep reservoirs from falling too low.

Such a cut would amount to about twice as much as the three Lower Basin states — Arizona, California and Nevada — agreed to absorb under the drought contingency plan they approved in early 2019.

Overall, the study warned that managing the river sustainably will require substantially larger cuts in use by Lower Basin states than currently envisioned, along with curbs on future diversions by Upper Basin states.

While climate change's impacts on the river have been repeatedly studied, this is the first study that seeks to pinpoint how warming temperatures would translate into reductions in water that river basin states could take over the long term.

Carrying out the study's recommendations, under the most likely conditions of climate change, almost certainly would mean more  supply curbs for the $4 billion Central Arizona Project.

The CAP is already slated to lose nearly half its total allocation under the worst case, shorter-term scenarios envisioned under the 2019 drought plan.

Tucson and Phoenix-area cities and tribes, along with Central Arizona farmers, all depend on the CAP for water for drinking or irrigation.


https://tucson.com/news/local/colorado-river-outlook-darkens-dramatically-in-new-study/article_15e0185d-60d7-597d-ba7f-366b8e69920e.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on February 07, 2021, 11:28:53 AM
New report confronts tough choices for the future of the Colorado River
It's time for hard conversations about what kind of future we want for the Colorado River and all who depend upon it.

>>>The Center for Colorado River Studies at Utah State University recently published a preprint edition of their new white paper titled, "Alternative Management Paradigms for the Future of the Colorado and Green Rivers." The authors of the paper include Kevin Wheeler, Jack Schmidt, Brad Udall, and former Colorado River District General Manager, Eric Kuhn, among a few notable others in the climate modeling and Colorado River management space (Disclosure: Jack Schmidt and Eric Kuhn both serve voluntarily on American Rivers' Science and Technical Advisory Committee.) The new publication builds upon a 2020 white paper, "Strategies for Managing the Colorado River in an Uncertain Future." Wheeler et. al ran scenarios for various planning strategies on one of the most managed rivers in the world, the Colorado, to better understand the implications of those decisions in a hotter and drier future. Using the same computer modeling tools used by basin managers (the Bureau of Reclamation CRSS model), they integrated new climate and river flow data and looked out decades into the future to explore and predict water supply conditions under various scenarios.


>>>The outcome of the study, in short: we've got to be more creative, and we need to have some hard conversations about what kind of future we want for the Colorado River and all who depend upon it.  American Rivers has been engaged with the authors of the study, and we're coming up to speed with its prescient findings. But even more important than that, our desire is to spark a conversation with you about what kind of future lies before us, what this new science tell us about various realities on the river, and how can we design solutions for the river, together.

John Fleck, author of a pair of recent books on western water, recently posted his take on the study, including some of the key highlights. He underscored that "Under a relatively optimistic scenario (things don't get any drier than they've been in the first two decades of the 21st century), stabilizing the system would require:

The Upper Basin to not increase its uses beyond its current ~4-million-acre feet per year of water use.
The Lower Basin to adjust to routinely only getting ~6-million-acre feet of water."

Basically, that means adapting to living in a 10-12 million-acre-foot (MAF) river, rather than a 17 MAF river as the Colorado River Compact assumes. Obviously, this stuck out to us too. While the Law of the River (the Colorado River Compact) essentially promised 7.5 MAF for the Upper Basin and 8.5 MAF for the Lower Basin (then added in Mexico's allocation later), the Alternative Management Paradigms study makes clear that this is now an unattainable, and unwise, ambition.

https://www.americanrivers.org/2021/02/new-report-confronts-tough-choices-for-the-future-of-the-colorado-river/?fbclid=IwAR2257RuyeTL1sLH21ARg7GQVXN8PEpzqbaqaqz03DYQ8vQCgLM3dMYGKXg

Unrealistic future depletion projections for the Upper Basin confound planning. There simply isn't enough water to meet the aspirations for growth of the Upper Basin. "Unreasonable and unjustified estimations create the impression that compact delivery violations...are inevitable. Such distortions mislead the public about the magnitude of the impending water supply crisis and make identifying solutions to an already difficult problem even harder."
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on March 28, 2021, 12:48:42 PM
Utah is a leader in cloud seeding. Is it working?
As drought deepens in the Colorado River Basin, the state's program could serve as a model for boosting West's water supplies.

>>>Utah's winter sports industry may claim the greatest snow on Earth, but for skiers and water watchers alike, there is hardly ever enough powder.

For nearly 50 years, the second-driest state in the nation has been giving natural winter storms an engineered boost to help deepen its snowpack through a program largely funded by state taxpayers, local governments and water conservancy districts. More recently, the states that rely on water from the lower Colorado River — California, Arizona and Nevada — have been paying for additional cloud seeding in Utah.

Thanks to the steady funding stream, Utah's program has developed into one of the most comprehensive weather modification efforts in the West, and, after decades of expansion, every major mountain range in the state now sees extensive cloud seeding.

But that doesn't mean aircraft are buzzing overhead, creating precipitation. Seeding — which in Utah is done mostly by stationary, propane-powered generators on the ground — is possible only under a narrow range of conditions, usually when snow is already in the forecast, explained Jake Serago, an engineer with the Utah Division of Water Resources.

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2021/03/28/utah-is-leader-cloud/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on April 22, 2021, 13:18:02 PM
The US May Be About to Declare Its First-Ever Water Shortage
Nevada, California, and especially Arizona could be affected by a shortfall of water beginning this coming August.


>>>This coming August, for the first time in its history, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is likely to issue a Level 1 Water Shortage Declaration which would trigger mandatory cuts in water consumption primarily in two states — Arizona and Nevada.

This past week, the bureau released its 24-month projection for water contained in the 1,450-mile-long (2,333 km) Colorado River. The river originates on the Western Slope of the Rocky Mountains in northern Colorado and is fed by the Green, Gunnison, and San Juan rivers.


https://interestingengineering.com/us-about-to-declare-its-first-water-shortage
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on April 22, 2021, 13:23:48 PM
When shit gets real, maybe a few folks will wake up.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Onslow on April 22, 2021, 18:45:21 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on April 22, 2021, 13:18:02 PMThe US May Be About to Declare Its First-Ever Water Shortage
Nevada, California, and especially Arizona could be affected by a shortfall of water beginning this coming August.


>>>This coming August, for the first time in its history, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is likely to issue a Level 1 Water Shortage Declaration which would trigger mandatory cuts in water consumption primarily in two states — Arizona and Nevada.

This past week, the bureau released its 24-month projection for water contained in the 1,450-mile-long (2,333 km) Colorado River. The river originates on the Western Slope of the Rocky Mountains in northern Colorado and is fed by the Green, Gunnison, and San Juan rivers.
https://interestingengineering.com/us-about-to-declare-its-first-water-shortage

This should've happened 5 years ago.  I cannot figure out how grass lawns are allowed in areas that tap the Colorado for water.


Dear Climate refugee, NC is full.  Piss off, and haul your asses VA.

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 07, 2021, 09:07:36 AM


Western tribes already lacked water access. Now there's a megadrought.

Why some tribal advocates and water experts are feeling hopeful.

Guests are not allowed to view images in posts, please Register or Login


>>>On paper, the 30 federally recognized tribes in the Colorado River Basin have access to 20 percent of the river's annual flow. But in practice, tribes in the basin only have access to a tiny fraction of the river's water, despite the federal government's fiduciary responsibility to protect tribal treaty rights and resources. In order to turn paper rights into permanent wet water rights, tribes have to enter into a complicated legal process called a water settlement with the federal government, states, water districts, and private users. Such settlements take years; they're expensive, complicated, and have to be authorized by Congress. "If the federal government were to do the settlements, they'd have to provide the infrastructure, provide the pipelines to actually move the water to the tribe," Berggren said. "If they were to, overnight, sign settlements with all 30 tribes for all 20 percent of water, there's concern that that would further 'break the system,' so to speak."

https://grist.org/politics/why-hope-might-be-on-the-horizon-for-western-tribes-water-woes/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 24, 2021, 08:43:37 AM
   
Melting Snow Usually Means Water For The West. But This Year, It Might Not Be Enough


Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on May 30, 2021, 12:55:55 PM
What Happens When The Colorado River Runs Dry?

https://s3.amazonaws.com/scifri-segments/scifri202105283.mp3
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 08, 2021, 09:18:06 AM
"Mega-drought" takes dramatic toll on Colorado River system that provides water to 40 million people

>>>For more than eight decades, the iconic Hoover Dam has relied on water from Nevada's Lake Mead to cover up its backside. But now, at age 85, it finds itself uncomfortably exposed. Much of the water the dam is supposed to be holding back is gone.

"This is like a different world," said Pat Mulroy, the former head of the Southern Nevada Water Authority. She told CBS News senior national and environmental correspondent Ben Tracy that Lake Mead, the nation's largest reservoir, is on track to soon hit its lowest level ever recorded.

This part of the Colorado River system is a crucial water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and Southern California. It makes the vast agricultural land of the desert Southwest possible.

Watch the video on the link below

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/mega-drought-colorado-river-system-water-40-million-people/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 08, 2021, 09:31:13 AM
Hoover Dam, a symbol of the modern West, faces an epic water shortage
The effects of drought and climate change are seen at Hoover Dam, which will soon hold the smallest amount of water since it was filled in the 1930s.

>>>BOULDER CITY, Nev. – Hoover Dam towers more than 700 feet above Black Canyon on the Arizona-Nevada state line, holding back the waters of the Colorado River. On top of the dam, where visitors peer down the graceful white arc of its face, one of its art deco-style towers is adorned with a work of art that memorializes the purposes of the dam.

In five relief sculptures by Oskar Hansen, muscular men grip a boat's wheel, harvest an armful of wheat, stand beside cascading water and lift a heavy weight overhead. Words encapsulate why the dam was built, as laid out in a 1928 law: FLOOD CONTROL, NAVIGATION, IRRIGATION, WATER STORAGE and POWER.

Eighty-six years after its completion in 1935, the infrastructure at Hoover Dam continues doing what it was designed to do: holding water and sending it coursing through intake tunnels, spinning turbines and generating electricity. The rules for managing the river and dividing up its water – which were laid down nearly a century ago in the 1922 Colorado River Compact and repeatedly tweaked – face the greatest strains since the dam was built.

The effects of years of severe drought and temperatures pushed higher by climate change are striking along Lake Mead's retreating shorelines near Las Vegas, where the growing "bathtub ring" of whitish minerals coats the rocky desert slopes.

https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/nation/2021/06/06/hoover-dam-drought-water-levels-lake-mead/5291323001/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 08, 2021, 19:04:35 PM
Amid mega-drought, rightwing militia stokes water rebellion in US west
Demonstrations have sparked fears of a confrontation between law enforcement and rightwing anti-government activist

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jun/08/klamath-falls-oregon-protests-ammon-bundy
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 11, 2021, 08:00:27 AM
Take a short quizz...

How Much Do You Know About U.S. Rivers?
They benefit people, wildlife, ecosystems, and economies—but many face serious threats


https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/articles/2021/06/09/how-much-do-you-know-about-us-rivers
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 11, 2021, 10:08:46 AM
With new law, Las Vegas water agency bets on 'aggressive municipal water conservation measure' to remove decorative turf, conserve Colorado River supply

>>>With Lake Mead approaching critically-low levels, the Southern Nevada Water Authority recently turned to the Legislature to double-down on its existing strategy for using less water: turf removal.

Earlier this year, Las Vegas water planners asked the Legislature to pass a new law that prohibits water-intensive decorative turf within medians, along roads and in business parks. Lawmakers approved it with little opposition and Gov. Steve Sisolak signed the bill on Friday.

Now, the water authority, which serves the Las Vegas metro area, is tasked with implementing what its general manager, John Entsminger, described as probably "the most aggressive municipal water conservation measure that's been taken in the western United States."

For decades, the water authority has been looking at the prolonged drought and preparing for shortages. Officials with the agency stress that they are able to weather the expected cuts because Las Vegas is already consuming less water than it is entitled to use.


https://thenevadaindependent.com/article/with-new-law-las-vegas-water-agency-bets-on-aggressive-municipal-water-conservation-measure-to-remove-decorative-turf-conserve-colorado-river-supply

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 17, 2021, 11:09:49 AM
Regulators approve emergency rules to allow halt of Russian River diversions for thousands of water right holders

>>>The state water board has unanimously approved emergency regulations behind a move to halt Russian River diversions for up to 2,400 water right holders, part of a wider effort to conserve dwindling supplies in Lake Sonoma and Lake Mendocino.

The 5-0 vote of the State Water Resources Control Board late Tuesday came over the objections raised by agricultural interests and allies who argued the new rule was too blunt a tool to use to address the worsening drought.

Hundreds of Sonoma and Mendocino county grape growers, ranchers, rural residents and even some municipal suppliers are on notice that they could have their rights suspended under the move.

Already, about 930 water right holders in the upper river, north of Healdsburg, have been told there is insufficient water in the system for them to take any this year.

https://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/news/regulators-approve-emergency-rules-to-allow-halt-of-russian-river-diversion/amp/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 20, 2021, 09:57:34 AM

https://californianewstimes.com/the-west-is-the-driest-its-been-in-1200-years/391330/



The West Is The Driest Its Been In 1200 Years



>>>Trees are dying. Riverbeds are empty. Lake Mead's water level dropped to its lowest point in history, and Utah's governor asked residents to pray for rain.Water is increasingly scarce in the Western U.S. — where 72 percent of the region is in "severe" drought, 26 percent is in exceptional drought, and populations are booming.Insufficient monsoon rains last summer and low snowpacks over the winter left states like Arizona, Utah and Nevada without the typical amount of water they need, and forecasts for the rainy summer season don't show promise.This year's aridity is happening against the backdrop of a 20-year-long drought. The past two decades have been the driest or the second driest in the last 1,200 years in the West, posing existential questions about how to secure a livable future in the region.It's time to ask, "Is this a drought, or is it just the way the hydrology of the Colorado River is going to be?" said John Entsminger, the general manager of the Southern Nevada Water Authority.A parched Sin CityGreater Las Vegas is one of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country, home to more than 2.2 million people, and it gets just over 4 inches of rain in a good year.Around 90 percent of the water comes from Lake Mead, the reservoir on the Colorado River formed by the Hoover Dam, which is currently 36 percent full.The drought has been so persistent that the Southern Nevada Water Authority and many other groups in the region have spent the last 20 years preparing for a drier future."It isn't sneaking up on us," Entsminger said. "Since 2002, our population has increased close to 50 percent, about 750,000 people in the last 19 years or so, and over that same time our aggregated depletions from the Colorado River have gone down 23 percent."
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Yallerhammer on June 23, 2021, 12:07:17 PM
I have a great idea. Let's build a bunch of huge cities in the middle of a desert.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Onslow on June 23, 2021, 12:33:13 PM
Vegas needs to go bye bye. It is an utterly useless black hole of excess and gluttony. Cruise ships as well.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 24, 2021, 14:15:00 PM
Quote from: Onslow on June 23, 2021, 12:33:13 PMVegas needs to go bye bye. It is an utterly useless black hole of excess and gluttony. Cruise ships as well.

I nominate Gatlinburg
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 25, 2021, 00:51:13 AM
'Less water means more gas': how drought will test California's stressed power grid
California's diminishing water supply is cutting down hydropower, causing the state to rely more on fossil fuels


>>> Earlier this month, the water level in Lake Oroville – California's second-largest reservoir – was so low that dozens of houseboats were hauled out. There wasn't enough water to hold them.
In a few weeks, officials say, the lake's water levels are likely to dip even lower – forcing them to shut down one of the state's largest hydroelectric power plants for the first time since it was built in 1967.
Amid a historic megadrought, the climate crisis and energy crisis in California are about to collide, and set off a vicious cycle. The state's diminishing water supply is cutting down hydropower, and California is relying more on fossil fuels as extreme summer heat drives up electricity use.

https://apple.news/AVSRAMEB6SFmoD3qGiDuceQ
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on June 27, 2021, 09:11:31 AM
https://www.npr.org/2021/06/26/1010521100/population-is-booming-in-the-west-but-theres-not-enough-water-to-keep-up-with-it


The real estate market is hot. So what happens if there's not enough water to build new homes? Colorado Public Radio's Michael Elizabeth Sakas reports on one city's struggles to grow in a dry state.

On the east side of Colorado Springs, flags and billboards line the roads advertising homes for sale - turn here. Hundreds of new units are under construction, and each requires water.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 09, 2021, 09:40:13 AM
Trout habitat will be lost in western Colorado drought
Most of a trout fishery on the Dolores river is expected to be lost in this years drought.



https://www.9news.com/article/weather/weather-colorado/trout-habitat-will-be-lost-western-colorado-drought/73-0e10cff3-9c9e-47a9-971b-245370c77fa1
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 09, 2021, 09:43:36 AM
Drought, heat, fire force fishing ban on Colorado River

DENVER (AP) — Colorado wildlife officials on Wednesday urged anglers to avoid fishing along a stretch of the Colorado River because low flows during a historic drought in the U.S. West, critically warm water temperatures and sediment runoff from wildfire burn scars are all starving trout of oxygen.

The move along a 120-mile (193-kilometer) stretch of the river — unusual so early in the summer — is another consequence of the record heat and drought that's afflicted the American West. The voluntary fishing ban runs from the town of Kremmling in north-central Colorado to Rifle in the western part of the state.

"The extreme drought on the Western Slope, plus the sediment and debris in the waterway, have created a really challenging situation for fish," said Travis Duncan, spokesman for Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

https://apnews.com/article/colorado-colorado-river-fish-fires-business-673c886864667cac4d3076195b9a976f
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Dougfish on July 09, 2021, 10:46:16 AM
The Yampa shut down after I left.
 -p-
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 11, 2021, 11:47:25 AM

'Unrecognizable.' Lake Mead, a lifeline for water in Los Angeles and the West, tips toward crisis

>>>LAKE MEAD, Nev. — Eric Richins looked out from his pontoon boat to the shallows on the lake's western edge. He squinted and paused as if he had come upon a foreign shore. For the first time in a career navigating the waters of the American West, he didn't know where he was.
"I could have sworn I was here just six weeks ago catching smallmouth and bigmouth bass," said the 35-year-old fisherman who runs tours on this 247-square-mile basin where the Colorado River meets the Hoover Dam to form the nation's largest reservoir.

He pointed ahead to what looked like dozens of tiny steps made from successive layers of dried mud now covered in tall grass and weeds — the effect of rapidly creeping vegetation over a shoreline that has been dropping by nearly a foot a week.

"Now it looks like a lawn. I knew the drought was bad. I didn't realize it was this bad," he said. "This place is unrecognizable."



https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/2021-07-11/lake-mead-hoover-dam-drought-nevada-arizona-california
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 20, 2021, 09:08:26 AM
Extreme actions underway to ensure Glen Canyon Dam can continue to generate power
Flaming Gorge will drop by 4 feet to keep water levels at Lake Powell above critical threshold for power generation

>>>The growing crisis on the Colorado River came into sharper focus last week when the Bureau of Reclamation began emergency releases from Flaming Gorge Reservoir to shore up Lake Powell's declining levels, now at historic lows.

The move will bolster Powell's level by 3 feet in hopes of preventing it from dropping to a point where Glen Canyon Dam would not be able to generate electrical power, according to the agency's Upper Colorado regional director Wayne Pullan.

These releases from Flaming Gorge and two other reservoirs were triggered by interstate agreements crafted in response to historic drought conditions that are stressing water supplies across the West.

>>>The releases will lower Flaming Gorge Reservoir, on the Green River, by 4 feet. Additionally, New Mexico's Navajo Lake on the San Juan River will give up 2 feet, while Colorado's Blue Mesa Reservoir on the Gunnison River will forfeit 8 feet.

https://www.sltrib.com/news/environment/2021/07/19/feds-release-water-down/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 24, 2021, 09:42:45 AM
Western Slope braces for Blue Mesa Reservoir drawdown

>>>The day water managers never hoped to see has arrived: Blue Mesa Reservoir will contribute water to keep the hydropower turbines at Lake Powell operational, as called for under the Upper Basin Drought Response Operations Agreement.

"This is a drastic time. We've never seen this before," State Rep. Marc Catlin, R-Montrose, said.

"This is one of the things we had agreed upon, that this would be the first action the Bureau (of Reclamation) took."

https://www.montrosepress.com/news/western-slope-braces-for-blue-mesa-reservoir-drawdown/article_e830a01c-eb65-11eb-bb4b-43f45e51adf9.html






Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: troutrus on July 25, 2021, 07:45:51 AM
https://youtu.be/04Kpkg1d6BE
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on July 27, 2021, 09:43:26 AM
Listen to a postcast; Arizona Edition

>>>The threats to the Colorado River are many – climate change, overuse, invasive species, dozens of planned diversion projects, pollution – and that has motivated action up and down the river's shores by a variety committed activists and regular people.

On this week's Arizona Edition we talk with Gary Wockner, Executive Director and co-founder of the group SAVE THE COLORADO, out of Fort Collins, Colorado.

audio link in this page...

https://www.kawc.org/post/arizona-edition-saving-colorado-river
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: troutrus on July 27, 2021, 12:10:39 PM
Great Salt Lake at historic low.

https://news.yahoo.com/low-levels-great-salt-lake-120347357.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on August 12, 2021, 09:12:14 AM
Gov. Jared Polis tours damage to Gwood Canyon after recent debris slides

https://www.postindependent.com/news/photos-gov-jared-polis-tours-damage-to-gwood-canyon-after-recent-debris-slides/

https://youtu.be/3k03YQHhZ68
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on August 12, 2021, 09:32:30 AM
New plan slows Lake Mead decline by paying farms not to plant crops


>>>Officials in Lower Colorado River Basin states want to slow the decline of Lake Mead's water levels over the next few years by paying Southern California farmers not to plant crops.

It's not a plan that Bill Hasencamp, manager of Colorado River resources for the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, considers a "drought buster," but it will reduce lake level decline by up to 3 feet over the next three years, he said.


https://www.reviewjournal.com/local/local-nevada/new-plan-slows-lake-mead-decline-by-paying-farms-not-to-plant-crops-2418280/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: troutrus on August 12, 2021, 10:52:17 AM
"First water cuts in US West supply to hammer Arizona farmers"


https://www.yahoo.com/news/first-water-cuts-us-west-041104562.html
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on August 15, 2021, 10:02:25 AM
Before-and-after satellite photos show just how terrible the drought is in the West



https://www.wspa.com/news/national/before-and-after-satellite-photos-show-just-how-terrible-the-drought-is-in-the-west/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 07, 2021, 09:28:16 AM
Colorado River Flows Once Again to Gulf of California


>>>On May 1, 2021, the river once again flowed in its delta thanks to an agreement between the United States and Mexico dubbed Minute 323. Through Oct. 11, a total of 35,000 acre-feet of water (11.4 billion gallons) will be released downstream from Morelos Dam on the U.S.-Mexico border to quench the thirst of this long-withered ecosystem.

The mammoth endeavor to rejuvenate the river delta was years in the making and involved dozens of people, including water managers, policymakers, scientists, conservationists, and nonprofits from both sides of the border.

"We provide a lot of brainpower and blood, sweat, and tears, and commitment to this," says Nancy Smith, Colorado River Program conservation director at the Nature Conservancy.

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https://www.publicnewsservice.org/2021-09-07/water/colorado-river-flows-once-again-to-gulf-of-california/a75603-1
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 07, 2021, 09:33:02 AM

These images from space show how much the reservoirs and lakes of the West have dried up
Satellite views four years apart from a chronicler of the world's largest lakes show the startling effects of the Western mega-drought.


Slide right, and create a new island. Slide left, and go back to a recent time when the West had enough water to actually fill its lakes.



A self-described lakes geek currently living in the European Union likes to teach people about their wild surroundings by creating before-and-after views of the world's great bodies of water, using satellite photos taken years apart. Catalin Trif and his lakepedia.com site compile a wealth of information about big lakes, and he reached out to The Colorado Sun after a seemingly unending series of Western drought stories caught his eye.




https://coloradosun.com/2021/09/06/western-drought-biggest-lakes-dry-up/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 10, 2021, 09:13:44 AM
The Colorado River Basin is experiencing its 22nd year of drought. Its reservoirs are at their lowest-ever levels. The water stored in the system is at just 40 percent of its capacity. How did the situation on the Colorado become so dire? And what does the shortage mean for the 40 million people who rely on its waters?


Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 21, 2021, 10:33:09 AM
Cottages of Boone Wastewater Tank Overflows Due to Mechanical Error

The Cottages of Boone, located at 615 Fallview Lane in Boone, North Carolina, experienced a discharge of untreated domestic wastewater. The housing development operates an on-site wastewater treatment system that is permitted through the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality's Division of Water Resources and serves 894 bedrooms and ancillary facilities.

The Cottage of Boone WWTP facility's equalization tank overflowed as the result of an emergent mechanical error that occurred at the treatment facility. The discharge is believed to have started late Monday, September 13, and ended at approximately 8:00 p.m. It is estimated that approximately 4,725 gallons of untreated wastewater were discharged to Laurel Fork stream within the Watauga River Basin during the event. A local sludge hauling company arrived on-site and pumped 12,000 gallons of raw wastewater from the equalization tank, stopping the overflow.


https://www.hcpress.com/front-page/cottages-of-boone-wastewater-tank-overflows-due-to-mechanical-error.html?fbclid=IwAR2J2Il7CQm4kmcd493KgEBv8gsmwzcDWNeKjtoOY-X-lrNfc4EJVroCYto

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on September 28, 2021, 09:14:17 AM
The Bad News Keeps Flowing For The Colorado River

>>>Federal officials project more bad news for the drought-stressed Colorado River, which provides water to Las Vegas and much of the Southwest.

The Bureau of Reclamation issued a report last week saying there is a high likelihood over the next few years that California, the river's largest water user, will join Nevada, Arizona, and Mexico in seeing cuts to its allocation.

"This is not breaking in the way that something just changed to make it happen," said Alex Hager, who covers the river for KUNC, "but it is incredibly serious news."

"The projections are not painting a particularly rosy picture for years to come," he told State of Nevada, "but I will say, in talking to folks around the basin, it seems like there is a lot of contingency planning for this. But no one is creating more water. No one is bringing more water into this basin."


Listen to the discussion

https://knpr.org/knpr/2021-09/bad-news-keeps-flowing-colorado-river

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 02, 2021, 09:16:41 AM
The Colorado River Is in Crisis. The Walton Family Is Pushing a Solution.
Walmart heirs have spent heavily to promote their view that water markets are the best way to deal with a dwindling supply

>>>A Wall Street Journal analysis shows that a charitable foundation controlled by the Waltons, the Walton Family Foundation, has given about $200 million over the past decade to a variety of advocacy groups, universities and media outlets involved in the river. No other donor comes close. Two federal officials once affiliated with the foundation have been named to key Biden administration posts overseeing the river.

Putting a monetary value on water has raised concerns among those who benefit from guaranteed access to water and those who believe markets benefit investors while hurting farmers and the poor. Water markets in Australia have been blamed for helping dry up waterways due to overuse by a handful of wealthy farmers and investors.

"Any time that the water starts becoming more valuable than the land, you end up with the possibility of outside speculators," said Andrew Mueller, general manager of the Colorado River District, a public planning and policy agency that oversees water use in western Colorado. Mr. Mueller said his state has been seeing continued interest in agricultural water and lands by outside investment groups.

The Walton foundation has for years held that water markets are among the best ways to distribute and conserve the water that flows along the 1,450-mile river. A number of environmental groups that take Walton money are prominent water-market boosters


https://www.wsj.com/articles/the-colorado-river-is-in-crisis-the-walton-family-is-pushing-a-solution-11633167002

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 04, 2021, 21:23:30 PM
This discussion covers a lot of the complicated water rights issues in Montana.

David Brooks on Saving Water for Trout
The Orvis Fly-Fishing Podcast

QuoteIn this week's podcast, my guest is David Brooks [43:45], executive director of Montana Trout Unlimited. With prevailing drought conditions in the western United Sates and increased demand from many users, from agriculture to municipalities to recreational angling, how can we balance the use of water? David explains the difference between the riparian doctrine used mostly in the eastern United Sates, and the prior appropriation doctrine used in western states, and explains how users have come together to apportion water for human use and for keeping enough water in rivers to support healthy trout populations. It's not easy and often contentious but it's a fascinating issue and there is hope that with wise use of water by all stakeholders we can support ranchers, farmers, cities, and healthy trout populations.


https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/david-brooks-on-saving-water-for-trout/id278930814?i=1000537177346
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Trout Maharishi on October 05, 2021, 00:05:25 AM
Never though about water until I lived in Southern Cal, I knew then as the population expanded it was going to be more and more of a problem. It's complicated, it's more than just weather cycles.
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 07, 2021, 09:32:17 AM
Native American tribes plea for help as Colorado River dries up
ABC News' Kayna Whitworth reports on the drought in the southwest, where over 40 million people, including 29 Native American tribes, are forced to ration water as the Colorado River dries up.

Watch a video report:

https://abcnews.go.com/US/video/native-american-tribes-plea-colorado-river-dries-80446169
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Yallerhammer on October 09, 2021, 16:28:39 PM
Maybe in retrospect, it's not a good idea to keep building mondo cities full of millions of people in the middle of a desert?
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on October 25, 2021, 09:23:45 AM
Ancient groundwater: Why the water you're drinking may be thousands of years old

>>>As rising temperatures and drought dry up rivers and melt mountain glaciers, people are increasingly dependent on the water under their feet. Groundwater resources currently supply drinking water to nearly half the world's population and roughly 40% of water used for irrigation globally.

What many people don't realize is how old – and how vulnerable – much of that water is.

Most water stored underground has been there for decades, and much of it has sat for hundreds, thousands or even millions of years. Older groundwater tends to reside deep underground, where it is less easily affected by surface conditions such as drought and pollution.

As shallower wells dry out under the pressure of urban development, population growth and climate change, old groundwater is becoming increasingly important.

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https://www.nevadacurrent.com/2021/10/24/ancient-groundwater-why-the-water-youre-drinking-may-be-thousands-of-years-old/


Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 02, 2021, 09:28:21 AM
The sand is there, but low water levels halt a controlled flood to restore Grand Canyon's beaches

The Southwest's active monsoon season this year washed tons of sand into the Colorado River, where it could have helped shore up the Grand Canyon's withering beaches, if not for one big problem: The water stored behind Glen Canyon Dam is at an all-time low after more than two decades of drought.

As a result, the federal government's dam managers have hit pause on an environmental program that calls for controlled floods out of Lake Powell when there's enough sand for the water to push up and rebuild sandbars and beaches, preserving the national park's ecology, river trip campsites and archaeological sites.

https://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/arizona-environment/2021/11/01/feds-say-theres-too-little-water-spare-grand-canyons-beaches/6201263001/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 03, 2021, 09:18:56 AM
Colorado's Dolores River should be raging through canyons — instead it's nearly dry



>>>Fish have been around and on the landscape and in these rivers for over a million years - we know that - up to 2 million years. These fish have evolved with low and high flows. So they can handle a certain amount of that. But what they can't handle is essentially a dry channel.


https://www.npr.org/2021/11/02/1051363365/colorados-dolores-river-should-be-raging-through-canyons-instead-its-nearly-dry
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 03, 2021, 09:21:25 AM
Climate change is having an adverse effect on South Carolina's Low Country



https://www.npr.org/2021/11/01/1051036131/climate-change-is-having-an-adverse-effect-on-south-carolinas-low-country
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Trout Maharishi on November 03, 2021, 19:02:55 PM
I was doubtful about a 3 or 4 foot rise, but NPR let's some people say anything. No doubt sea level is rising. I found this interesting article when I was looking at data about sea level rises in the last 2000 years.   https://www.whoi.edu/press-room/news-release/why-is-sea-level-rising-higher-in-some-places-along-u-s-east-coast-than-others/
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 05, 2021, 09:18:47 AM
https://youtu.be/RjU40VX7NXQ
Live in 5 days
November 10, 7:00 PM



The Colorado River runs nearly fifteen hundred miles, winding through seven states and
Mexico. It supplies drinking water to nearly 40 million people, irrigates nearly 4 million
acres of farmland and attracts millions of nature lovers to scenic Grand Canyon vistas.
And it is on the brink.
A 20 year mega-drought -- exacerbated by climate change -- is squeezing the Colorado dry. It's
a crisis for the people of the Southwest and a "canary in the coal mine" for us all.

Join PBS NewsHour's Miles O'Brien for a special hour-long live event exploring the relationship between climate change and the fate of the Colorado River Basin.
Hosted live from Phoenix, the program will foster a
solutions-based dialog with leaders in areas of science, agriculture, municipal water,
Native American communities and conservation.

The event is sponsored by the Walton Family Foundation.

Stream your PBS favorites with the PBS app: https://to.pbs.org/2Jb8twG
Find more from PBS NewsHour at https://www.pbs.org/newshour
Subscribe to our YouTube channel: https://bit.ly/2HfsCD6
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 28, 2021, 10:10:38 AM
https://youtu.be/Tu32N_Lwk5M
Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 28, 2021, 10:18:17 AM
Investors are buying AZ farmland to sell Colorado River water allotment to PHX area home developers

>>>An investment company has purchased nearly 500 acres of farmland along the Arizona-California border with plans to take its water allotment and send it to the Phoenix area for new housing developments.

AZCentral reports the investment company Greenstone bought the farmland and is awaiting federal approval to sell most of its water entitlement to the town of Queen Creek, north of Phoenix. It's one of the fastest-growing suburbs in Arizona.

If approved, the purchase could pave the way for similar deals as water demand in the Southwest outpaces supply.

https://www.knau.org/knau-and-arizona-news/2021-11-26/investors-are-buying-az-farmland-to-sell-colorado-river-water-allotment-to-phx-area-home-developers

Title: Re: unlimited it's the water, stupid
Post by: Woolly Bugger on November 30, 2021, 10:01:38 AM
Scientists working to understand record of mine-related contamination in sediment below Lake Powell
Initial data from a 2018 research project is now being released.


>>>The goal was to understand not just the potential impacts of the Gold King Mine disaster but also to analyze the record of sediment that is trapped in the upper reaches of Lake Powell and is 50 feet thick in places.

The initial data gathered on the project is just now being released, and Hynek gave a public presentation on the preliminary results earlier this month. His hope is that the project will be useful to scientists working across the river basin on a variety of projects. The sediment record, he explained, "is like the ultimate ground truth on what has happened in the upper Colorado River Basin on a very large scale over 70 years."

Cores taken in the San Juan arm of the reservoir show spikes of lead and zinc that may have been deposited from the Gold King Mine spill in 2015, but there are much bigger — and more concerning — spikes of the metals that were likely deposited in the 1970s when larger mine waste-related disasters occurred in the watershed.

"Bigger things happened in the 70s in the San Juan than the Gold King," Hynek said.

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https://www.sltrib.com/news/2021/11/26/scientists-working/