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Boots built for distance

Started by Transylwader, January 18, 2012, 16:26:42 PM

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What boots are highly durable for distance and punishment in the creek?

Simms (incl model type please)
6 (42.9%)
Chota (incl model type please)
2 (14.3%)
Corkers (incl model type please)
1 (7.1%)
Orvis (incl model type please)
3 (21.4%)
Patagonia (incl model type please)
0 (0%)
Other (please mention brand name/model type)
2 (14.3%)

Total Members Voted: 14

Voting closed: February 17, 2012, 16:26:41 PM

Transylwader

So after four years of solid bluelining in NC, I have gone through about 7 pairs of boots, primarily because of the terrain and distance they are subject to. I am tired of skulling out hundreds of dollars on boots and would appreciate your thoughts on what you have used or currently have that you would consider able to last a year or longer. I currently have a brand new pair of Orvis Brogue side zipper (third pair mind you) but they are dead weight and fall apart rather quickly. Was tempted to go back to felt because they are a lot lighter than Vibram but before I decide, I'd like to hear from the avid blueliners here...

The person with the best suggestion gets a 6-pack of their choice plus a visit to The Palace this spring on me.

Shot dudes ;D


Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

The Dude

January 18, 2012, 17:03:26 PM #2 Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 17:28:54 PM by The Dude

Nice pull, WB.   :-*

My input based on what I've worn:

Chota Abrams Creek - great entry level boot, but won't stand up to a season of bushwacking and aren't sturdy enough for hiking while loaded down with gear.

Cloudveil 8X - I actually never owned them, but had friends who owned them and said they liked them, but they went out of biz, so who cares

Simms Freestone - pieces of shit

Simms Headwaters - My first real bluelining boot.  Good lightweight boot, but you'd get a year at best....at best.  But simms does have a good return policy, and I still keep my second free pair around for light duty trips.

Simms Rivershed Boots - Perfect blend of lightweight yet still sturdy.  I wear mine in the winter as well as summer and they do the job.  Definitely my recommendation and plan on buying another pair when the current ones are ready for retirement.  I even wore them as my hiking boots on a 4 day backpacking/fishing trip last year.

Simms Guide Boots - Good and rugged, but too heavy.

I have not tried the G4s, but from what I've seen in the stores, they seem a little bit of overkill for bluelining and may also be on the heavy side.  Simms also has a RiverTek BOA boot that looks lightweight and simple, but I've only ever seen them online and my fear is that they won't be able to stand up to the abuse.

Also, I am a proponent of the rubber soles with a combination of star cleats and studs.  The only problem is that the lugs wear out and the nearest place to get them resoled is Georgia or New York, I think.  I almost think that I am just going to buy new boots once the soles wear out, even if the uppers are still good (which should take ~2 years or possibly less).

I was born by the river in a little tent,<br />And just like the river I've been running ever since,<br />It's been a long, long time coming,<br />But I know change is gonna come.

snagaluffaguss

January 18, 2012, 17:15:02 PM #3 Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 17:17:51 PM by snagaluffaguss

A boot for hiking is too heavy to be comfortable to be enjoyable on the water while fishing.

A boot for fishing is usually do lightweight for hiking long distances.

Get a pair of lightweight hiking shoes from some one like Asolo, Solomon, or Vasque.  Not something built for climbing Evrest mind you just something lightweight that is more of a really sturdy Tennis shoe with a good lug.

Wear them in and put them in your pack and put on your fishing shoes.  Again go with a lightweight shoe like a Chota STL, or most Korkers, or a light weight Simms (most are too damn heavy for blue lines).

Be willing to buy a pair every year for the comfort rather than getting one that lasts 5 years but takes 4 years to break in because they are such Bricks.


blue ridge angler

The dude nailed it..I rock simms head waters right now, and like them. but no matter what I have used I end up spending $100 per year..I dropped the $200 on guide boots and they lasted 2 years, but as was mentioned were a little heavy..I like vibram soles, and hike in them..I have not found the need to drop any extra money on studs of any kind, and don't care for the effect that the studs have on the mosses that cover the boulders on some of my favorite creeks..


FoulHook

Quote from: Transylwader on January 18, 2012, 16:26:42 PM

The person with the best suggestion gets a 6-pack of their choice plus a visit to The Palace this spring on me.

How about I bring you a six pack (your choice of whatever Ingles got in stock) and some old sneakers, which may or may not fit over stocking foot waders, to The Palace and we poach the shit outta them local hatcheries?

Orvis boots suck fyi.
Quote from: Transylwader on June 03, 2011, 22:56:17 PM
The Davidson. It's full of wild fish.

bullship

i got some of deez not too long ago. i don't expect them to hold up for long, but they are comfy and practically weightless.... I have been wearing guide boots for a few years though, so my thighs are highly conditioned.

Korkers Hyjack. One hundred dolla
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It's all shit, piss and bliss.

"This is the low rent district, and much like a trailer park, it doesn't attract the most upstanding citizens.
You can't piss in a mr coffee & get tasters choice."- Grannyknot

dnakamoto

I don't have a lot of experience since I have only used two different pairs.  I purchased the Simms Rivershed Vibram a while back and they have been a good combination of boots that I can hike in and use on the water.  I still find the Vibram doesn't have all of the grip that felt had on smooth wet rock surfaces. 


Aka

I've put 200+ days on my simms freestones and they're still holding up fine. I got them for 2 reasons, first they were the only size 14 in the store (kinda a make it or break it) and they were on sale for $100. I didn't expect them to last as well as they have but they've proved to be pretty damned rugged imo. The big downer for me is that they are not at all athletic, and while I carry the lightest pack I can they still don't have cushion or spring so long hikes in and out can get a bit jarring on the back.

But all said a hundo for 200 days fishing isn't a bad deal.


Big J

Quote from: AK Aaron on January 18, 2012, 21:12:43 PM

I've put 200+ days on my simms freestones and they're still holding up fine. I got them for 2 reasons, first they were the only size 14 in the store (kinda a make it or break it) and they were on sale for $100. I didn't expect them to last as well as they have but they've proved to be pretty damned rugged imo. The big downer for me is that they are not at all athletic, and while I carry the lightest pack I can they still don't have cushion or spring so long hikes in and out can get a bit jarring on the back.

But all said a hundo for 200 days fishing isn't a bad deal.

Ya know, I read the dudes critic on the Simms Freestones, and I don't really agree with it.  I'm no blue lining gyro like y'all and I haven't been at it for decades, so I have been quiet.  But after reading AK Aaron's post on them I guess I'll throw out my two cents.  I have had the Simms Freestone boots for a year now, and got them for the hiking/wading aspect.  I have the Simms Star Cleats in them and I love the boots.  They have held up well and I have confidence that they will make it through another year.  They are big and bulky, but if you want a hiking/wading boot that will last, it has to be bulky.  I personally love the boot, but like I said, I'm no blue lining gyro.  Just my two cents.


Woolly Bugger

January 18, 2012, 22:24:57 PM #10 Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 22:35:05 PM by Woolly Bugger

I've also got the Simms Freestone's, they are built to last, give great support/protection, but aren't built for the hike, as they are pretty darn stiff. They are good for the tailwaters. I've hiked miles in them, but wish I had a different boot for the long distance streams. I've also had LL Bean's boots, in three different versions starting with the orginal Aquastealth model. Don't really care for the fit, and they aren't comfortable either.


Edit:

I wore them for about a year before finally putting the Star Cleats in, they add almost too much grip!

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Grannyknot

I had a pair of Korkers cross currents and the toe box tore out after a year.
I sewed the toe box up with some upholstery thread and they lasted another year.
Then I got some Cloudviel 8X boots on clearance from the madison river people.
Good boots, didn't trash out too easily, and were very light, but they ran small and felt cramped with my waders on....neoprene ankle booties only for those.
This Christmas I got Korker's red sides.  So far they have pleased me, but the verdict is still out on the durability.

I've come to think that they're all just made for standing in the middle of a big river watching a strike indicator, not hiking 4 miles, scrambling over rocks and thrashing some rhodo.

Flea is not the best bassist of all time.

snagaluffaguss

Quote from: Grannyknot on January 19, 2012, 09:37:08 AM

I've come to think that they're all just made for standing in the middle of a big river watching a strike indicator, not hiking 4 miles, scrambling over rocks and thrashing some rhodo.

Exactly

Thats what hiking boots are for

Wading boots are for wading.

Hike in your hiking boots and wade in your wading boots.


WRector

First pair of wading boots I ever purchased were the Cabelas Pro Guide series with felt soles.  Hiked a ton of miles out of them and probably got 6 or so years worth of abuse.  Wore the felt all the way down to bottom part of the shoe.  Not a great hiker, but did the job.  Probable could have gotten away with putting a better insole in them, but they got too tight for my feet.

I've since switched to the Simms Rivershed Boot with the Vibram Soles.  Like these as well.  Well built and have been put though some abuse.  Definitely need the studs in on the tailwaters, but could probably do without them on the smaller cricks.

For the money, the Cabelas Guide boots were a hell of a deal, but I can't speak to the newer versions.

There's a big difference between a dry fly dancing through
a riffle and a weighted fur ball dragging on the bottom.

thamilton89

I ripped the bottom off an pair of chacos and replaced them with felt bottoms great for summertime I'm thinking I should pitch the idea to chacos.



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