Author Topic: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...  (Read 23700 times)

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Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #135 on: December 04, 2017, 12:26:35 PM »

Baby endangered California salmon use different rivers than expected, research shows

Biologists assumed baby winter-run Chinook salmon hung out in the Sacramento River where they hatched until they grew large enough to make the trip downstream to the Pacific Ocean.

A recently released scientific study challenges that assumption – and may have implications in how fisheries agencies manage Sacramento Valley waterways to protect the critically endangered fish.

In a paper published online last week in the journal Biological Conservation, a team of California researchers revealed a surprising finding: Juvenile winter-run Chinook aren’t just using the Sacramento River as rearing habitat; after hatching, they also venture in large numbers into the river’s tributaries, including creeks that feed into it below Redding, as well the Feather and the American rivers.

Winter-run Chinook are a distinct species of salmon that return each year to spawn and die in the Sacramento River near Redding. As recently as the 1960s, tens of thousands of adult fish used to make the one-way journey.

http://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/water-and-drought/article187861334.html


Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #136 on: December 05, 2017, 15:50:03 PM »
iver-watchers saw a small uptick in the number of Atlantic salmon that returned to the Penobscot River this year, but the total — 840 — still meant that for a sixth consecutive year, fewer than 1,000 salmon were counted, according to data compiled by the Maine Department of Marine Resources Division of Sea Run Fisheries and Habitat.

Since salmon returns began at the Veazie Dam in 1978 (now counts are done at Milford), that’s the longest string of sub-1,000 years recorded. Another four-year string of sub-1,000-fish years occurred from 1999 through 2002.


http://outthere.bangordailynews.com/2017/12/04/fishing/840-atlantic-salmon-counted-on-the-penobscot-this-year/

Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #137 on: December 08, 2017, 13:48:06 PM »
The Hope Island Fish Farm floats in the middle of Puget Sound, about a 15-minute boat ride from Whidbey Island’s Deception Pass. Narrow metal walkways surround giant nets anchored to the bottom of the sound. Those nets hold thousands of Atlantic salmon--though it’s difficult to see them until they jump.

Tom Glaspie is the site manager. As he talks, rotating metal tubes spray fish food out over the water.

Glaspie said he dives in with the fish about once a month to check that the nets are still properly anchored.

“It’s very dark down there,” Glaspie said. "Swim right through them, and you won’t see a single fish.”

Atlantic salmon have been farmed in the Sound for more than 30 years. That’s in part because Atlantic salmon are domesticated: They grow faster than Pacific salmon and don’t get into fights in the pens. It’s like the difference between raising cattle and raising bison.

There are environmental reasons as well. When Atlantic salmon escape, they can’t breed with native salmon. But, if Pacific salmon were to be domesticated and to escape, they could breed with wild fish and dilute their genetic stock.

Part 1
http://nwpr.org/post/does-atlantic-salmon-fish-farming-puget-sound-have-future

Part 2
http://nwpr.org/post/future-northwest-fish-farming-may-be-all-land






Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #138 on: December 12, 2017, 11:31:03 AM »
More than three months after about 100,000 Atlantic salmon escaped a net pen in Puget Sound, they are still turning up strong and lively in the Skagit River.

Strong, silvery and feisty, the Atlantic salmon hit the boat deck, thrashing and thumping. It was the sixth one the Upper Skagit Indian fishing crew caught that day.

More than three months after a massive escape of Atlantic salmon from Cooke Aquaculture’s net pen at Cypress Island, Atlantics are still turning up very much alive in the Skagit River, one of Washington’s premier Pacific salmon strongholds.


Out to collect chum for broodstock for the tribe’s hatchery, the crew drifted a quarter-mile stretch of the river, putting in at Hamilton, Skagit County. They caught more Atlantics than anything else: more than coho, more than chum, more than Dolly Varden trout, more even than suckers.

Caught more than 42 miles up the Skagit in a brief fishery in just a short stretch of river, those Atlantics were surely not the only ones in the river or the region, said Scott Schuyler, natural-resources director for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe, based in Sedro-Woolley.


https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/escaped-atlantic-salmon-found-42-miles-up-skagit-river/

Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #139 on: December 18, 2017, 11:26:39 AM »
State cancels Atlantic salmon farm lease at Port Angeles


Cooke Aquaculture Pacific has lost the lease for its Atlantic salmon net-pen farm in Port Angeles and must shut down and remove it, said Hilary Franz, state commissioner of public lands, who terminated the lease.
[/size]
The farm, operated by a series of owners since 1984, holds nearly 700,000 Atlantic salmon. Franz said the state Department of Natural Resources will work with other state agencies to enforce an orderly shutdown and removal of the farm.[/font]
[/size]Franz said her decision is final.
[/size]
[/size]http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/article190249289.html

 -0-   -0-   -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- [/font]

Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #140 on: December 22, 2017, 10:39:13 AM »
http://www.cnn.com/2017/12/21/homepage2/alaska-mine-pebble-epa-invs/index.html

See Video in Link!


A mining company announced on Thursday that it is proceeding with plans to build an Alaskan gold and copper mine, which critics say threatens to pollute the home of the world's largest wild sockeye salmon population.

Northern Dynasty Minerals said it would file on Friday to begin the permit process to develop the controversial project, known as Pebble Mine.
The move was made possible after Environmental Protection Agency director Scott Pruitt removed special protections that were placed on the Bristol Bay watershed during the Obama administration. Canadian-based Northern Dynasty, parent company of Pebble Limited Partnership, acknowledged it was the withdrawal of the EPA's protection under the Clean Water Act that has allowed the mine permit process to move forward.

Initial plans for the gold and copper mine to be built in the Bristol Bay watershed were extremely controversial, resulting in a yearslong environmental study by the EPA.

Offline BRFFF

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #141 on: September 01, 2018, 08:30:13 AM »

Offline BRFFF

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #142 on: September 01, 2018, 08:33:56 AM »
https://www.thedailyworld.com/news/rising-yakima-river-temperatures-pose-threat-to-salmon/

Global warming and drought are causing higher water temperatures on the  Yakima threatening salmon populations 


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Offline BRFFF

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #143 on: September 01, 2018, 08:36:38 AM »
http://amp.thenewstribune.com/latest-news/article217577900.html

Nearly 1 million more Atlantic salmon are headed to Puget Sound, a year after a catastrophic fish escape caused by the same company that now is stocking more pens.


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Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #144 on: October 26, 2018, 10:43:17 AM »
Coho salmon come home to Lostine River after 40-year absence
Two fish return, with perhaps thousands close behind

After a nearly 40-year absence, the first adult coho salmon entered the mouth of the Lostine River Sunday night. The silvery female is returning to the river where she was released as hatchery smolt in 2017.
According to Rick Zollman, production supervisor at the Nez Perce Tribe’s Lostine River weir, the female was 57 centimeters long, healthy and ripe with eggs. Just a day later, a 71 centimeter male coho found his way into the fish trap at the mouth of the river.
In an email Tuesday morning announcing the return of the first two fish from the 2017 release, Jim Harbeck, manager of the Nez Perce Tribe’s Joseph Fisheries office, joked, “Now they’re a couple.”
What isn’t a joke are the odds these fish overcame to get to the Lostine. Part of a reintroduction project sponsored by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tribe, this first couple of adult coho were some of 500,000 smolt, juvenile salmon ready to migrate to the ocean, released during a ceremony March 9, 2017.


https://www.lagrandeobserver.com/home/6624935-151/coho-salmon-come-home-to-lostine-river-after

Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #145 on: October 26, 2018, 10:45:00 AM »
Tossing salmon for science
A decades-long experiment demonstrates how the iconic fish help trees grow.


Every year thousands of sockeye salmon meet their end in Hansen Creek, a pebble-strewn tributary of Lake Aleknagik in southwestern Alaska, whether from old age or at the paws and jaws of a brown bear. Either way, they’re almost certainly destined to rot away on the north-facing bank of the stream.That’s because professors, researchers and students have been systematically tossing their carcasses to that side of the creek for the last 20 years. The scientists count and measure the carcasses and then toss them out of the streambed and up into the forest using wooden poles with metal hooks on the end, called gaffs. In total, they tossed about 295 tons of salmon onto Hansen Creek’s north-facing bank to avoid double counting surveyed fish. In doing so, they have created a unique opportunity to study exactly how salmon fertilize the forest.

Over the past 20 years, researchers across the Northwest have shown that salmon play an essential role in forests: Trees next to salmon-bearing streams appear to grow better than their salmon-deprived counterparts, and the nutrients salmon bring from the ocean make their way into the needles and wood of trees. But this experiment, https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ecy.2453 described in a recently published paper, led by Tom Quinn, a professor in the School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences at the University of Washington, proves a basic fact: More salmon means faster growing trees.

https://www.hcn.org/articles/scientific-research-tossing-salmon-for-science
« Last Edit: October 26, 2018, 10:47:13 AM by Woolly Bugger »

Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #146 on: November 04, 2018, 11:21:53 AM »
LEWISTON – Three adult coho salmon, the first from an effort by the Nez Perce Tribe to re-establish an extinct run, have returned to the Lostine River.

The fish, which were among the more than 500,000 smolts released into the river in March 2017, were trapped at a weir near the town of Lostine this week. More fish are on their way.

Before the smolts were released last year, about 5,000 were implanted with tiny electronic tags that allow them to be detected as they pass dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers. According to the latest information available, an estimated 2,100 of the fish have climbed fish ladders at Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and about 300 have crossed Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River.

Becky Johnson, production manager for the tribe’s fisheries division, said there haven’t been two adult coho in the Lostine River since 1966. The run was officially declared extinct in the 1980s.


http://www.spokesman.com/stories/2018/nov/03/three-adult-coho-salmon-have-returned-to-lostine-r/


Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #147 on: November 09, 2018, 16:05:04 PM »
https://www.adn.com/politics/2018/11/06/stand-for-salmon-measure-losing-as-early-results-stream-in/


Ballot measure meant to boost salmon protections loses decisively

A ballot measure designed to boost protections for salmon and other fish failed by a large margin Tuesday night amid an onslaught of heavy opposition spending by powerful oil and mining interests.
With 98 percent of precincts reporting by 1:30 a.m. Wednesday, Ballot Measure 1 received 145,997 votes against, and 83,479 votes in favor, a 64-to-36 margin.

Offline Woolly Bugger

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #148 on: November 09, 2018, 16:08:00 PM »
With salmon ballot measure’s defeat, Pebble celebrates

https://www.alaskapublic.org/2018/11/08/with-salmon-ballot-measures-defeat-pebble-celebrates/

By a significant margin, Alaska voters defeated Ballot Measure 1, commonly known as the Stand for Salmon initiative.
The controversial measure was aimed at increasing protections for Alaska’s most iconic fish. It would have significantly toughened the environmental permitting process for large developments impacting salmon habitat.
The outcome was celebrated by a key figure pressing ahead on another controversial issue: the CEO of the Pebble Limited Partnership.
Pebble CEO Tom Collier said even though his company’s mine proposal wasn’t always at the forefront of the debate, the salmon habitat initiative was, in some ways, all about Pebble.
“It was clear that this initiative was aimed at trying to stop Pebble and to stop any other major significant resource development project in Alaska,” Collier said in an interview Wednesday.


Offline Aka

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Re: Unlimited Salmon/Steelhead News Update...
« Reply #149 on: November 12, 2018, 09:56:46 AM »
With salmon ballot measure’s defeat, Pebble celebrates

https://www.alaskapublic.org/2018/11/08/with-salmon-ballot-measures-defeat-pebble-celebrates/

By a significant margin, Alaska voters defeated Ballot Measure 1, commonly known as the Stand for Salmon initiative.
The controversial measure was aimed at increasing protections for Alaska’s most iconic fish. It would have significantly toughened the environmental permitting process for large developments impacting salmon habitat.
The outcome was celebrated by a key figure pressing ahead on another controversial issue: the CEO of the Pebble Limited Partnership.
Pebble CEO Tom Collier said even though his company’s mine proposal wasn’t always at the forefront of the debate, the salmon habitat initiative was, in some ways, all about Pebble.
“It was clear that this initiative was aimed at trying to stop Pebble and to stop any other major significant resource development project in Alaska,” Collier said in an interview Wednesday.

A bunch of fucking dipshits live in Alaska.