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Didymo

Started by 9ft4wt, May 19, 2010, 14:03:17 PM

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9ft4wt

Does anyone remember when didymo was first found on the Smith River. Seems like I recall seeing it in 2005, and i certainly was not the first one to notice it. Maybe Shane, Al, Ralph or Ben have a better idea.

Also seems like it was on the Smith before the SoHo. is that correct or is old age addling my memory?

9ft4wt


outdoorguy3

Dan,  I first saw the didymo on the Smith in 04 or 05.  did some searching to find out what it was.  I remember asking the stae guys abut it at a Smith River TU meeting and they didn't have a clue.  I gave them web sites that they could go to and find out more about the stuff.

I do remember seeing it on the SoHo in isolated patches abut the same time.

I'm thinking that it has spread on these rivers because of all the generation and the cold water being released help the spread.  I'm hoping that with warmer water temps as summer approaches the areas covered will decline.

I notices less in areas where I fished on the SoHo three weeks ago compared to last weekend.  Thinking warmer water temps will not support the didy  because of it's requirement of cold water to sustain itself.

The  Smith has blooms and then declines, so I'm sure it will be some of the same on the SoHo.

Didymo is naturally found in high mountain streams with cold clear water.

Ralph   0--0

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Beetle

From Wikipedia.........the unholiest of online sources....

Tennessee: Didymo was found in the tailwaters of the Norris, Cherokee, Wilbur and South Holston hydroelectric dams in 2005. It is the first U.S. finding east of the Mississippi River.[6]

Virginia: Didymo was identified in western Virginia in the summer of 2006 in the Smith River, the Jackson River, and the Pound River.[7]


OldDominionAngler

Quote from: outdoorguy3 on May 19, 2010, 15:02:40 PM

Dan,  I first saw the didymo on the Smith in 04 or 05.  did some searching to find out what it was.  I remember asking the stae guys abut it at a Smith River TU meeting and they didn't have a clue.  I gave them web sites that they could go to and find out more about the stuff.

I do remember seeing it on the SoHo in isolated patches abut the same time.

I'm thinking that it has spread on these rivers because of all the generation and the cold water being released help the spread.  I'm hoping that with warmer water temps as summer approaches the areas covered will decline.

I notices less in areas where I fished on the SoHo three weeks ago compared to last weekend.  Thinking warmer water temps will not support the didy  because of it's requirement of cold water to sustain itself.

The  Smith has blooms and then declines, so I'm sure it will be some of the same on the SoHo.

Didymo is naturally found in high mountain streams with cold clear water.

Ralph   0--0

Ralph, any idea why didymo hasn't showed up in area mountain streams?  I'd thought warm temps in the summer time, but I didn't realize it's naturally found in high mountain streams. Seems like it would have had plenty of chances to track around in five years yet its still limited to tailwaters.

Woolly Bugger

Quote from: Beetle on May 19, 2010, 15:11:11 PM

From Wikipedia.........the unholiest of online sources....

Tennessee: Didymo was found in the tailwaters of the Norris, Cherokee, Wilbur and South Holston hydroelectric dams in 2005. It is the first U.S. finding east of the Mississippi River.[6]

Virginia: Didymo was identified in western Virginia in the summer of 2006 in the Smith River, the Jackson River, and the Pound River.[7]

if wiki says so it must be true?
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flatlander

Quote from: OldDominionAngler on May 19, 2010, 15:43:16 PM

Ralph, any idea why didymo hasn't showed up in area mountain streams?  I'd thought warm temps in the summer time, but I didn't realize it's naturally found in high mountain streams. Seems like it would have had plenty of chances to track around in five years yet its still limited to tailwaters.
I suspect the colder temps in the tailwaters are the main reason it thrives there, but I've wondered if the tree canopies of mountain streams protect them from it.  Does it thrive in direct sun?  Seems like it doesn't grow as heavily on the tailwaters in areas that are well shaded, so maybe the tree canopies of mountain streams deter it? 

troutphisher

Flat,
That makes a lot of sense, I usually see heavy didymo on the wide open "full sun" areas of the soho, and the shaded areas have less.

From what I have read about it, it thrives in cold temperature, those less than 50 F.
When it gets above 50, it starts to die off, but the spores remain behind to bloom again when the temps fall.

The spores can go dormant, and remain "live" even when they are semi dried. Test results have shown it can be transfered to other bodies of water through wild life, and or fisher's.

It is definitely some wicked shit to wade through, especially on round boulders.
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Fire-Fly

I have been fishing the Smith since about 1991 and i can remember seeing very small patches of the stuff i want to say in late 90's early 2000. But no where near what it is now. But no one knew what diddymo was back then so i'm not sure if people just didnt recognize it till later. I will say this though, it dosent seem right now to affect the stream much. I have spent hours turning over rocks covered in the stuff and find as many bugs there as in the clean water.


outdoorguy3

Quote from: OldDominionAngler on May 19, 2010, 15:43:16 PM

Quote from: outdoorguy3 on May 19, 2010, 15:02:40 PM

Dan,  I first saw the didymo on the Smith in 04 or 05.  did some searching to find out what it was.  I remember asking the stae guys abut it at a Smith River TU meeting and they didn't have a clue.  I gave them web sites that they could go to and find out more about the stuff.

I do remember seeing it on the SoHo in isolated patches abut the same time.

I'm thinking that it has spread on these rivers because of all the generation and the cold water being released help the spread.  I'm hoping that with warmer water temps as summer approaches the areas covered will decline.

I notices less in areas where I fished on the SoHo three weeks ago compared to last weekend.  Thinking warmer water temps will not support the didy  because of it's requirement of cold water to sustain itself.

The  Smith has blooms and then declines, so I'm sure it will be some of the same on the SoHo.

Didymo is naturally found in high mountain streams with cold clear water.

Ralph   0--0

Ralph, any idea why didymo hasn't showed up in area mountain streams?  I'd thought warm temps in the summer time, but I didn't realize it's naturally found in high mountain streams. Seems like it would have had plenty of chances to track around in five years yet its still limited to tailwaters.
Water may not be cold enough in NC mountain streams.  Originally found in Northern Rocky streams in Canada.
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