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Nymphing

Started by Larry, January 28, 2007, 11:06:12 AM

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Larry

I've been fly fishing for a while, but have only gotton serious about nymphing in the last year. I just read some information in "Pocket Guide to Nymph Fishing" that  talks about the movements  of nymphs under water. As I have only  utilized the dead drift, I wonder if I am completely  missing something. Should some type of movement be imparted to nymphs when you are fishing them and, if so, what type of movement should be utilized?

Any thoughts or suggestions that any one  this about this would be appreciated.

Larry


Woolly Bugger

January 28, 2007, 11:37:11 AM #1 Last Edit: January 28, 2007, 11:41:40 AM by Woolly Bugger

At then end of a drift let the fly line drift downstream until it straightens in the current the nymph will rise up at the end of the drift and you will be surprised how many hits you'll get right at the very last moment as the fish follow the nymph up through the water column. This rise is named after somebody who's name starts with "L" like Lessering rise.

http://www.orvis.com/intro.asp?subject=566&bhcp=1

http://www.flyfishinggear.info/how_to/nymph-fishing-basic-methods.shtm

Here's a like to a pretty cool video of the Bounce Technique....

http://www.fliesandfinswest.com/article603.html

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

troutphisher

I used the technique described above, but also add to it depending on the type of water fished. I fish pocket water and seams in the faster sections as well as riffles. In these type of waters I use a small strip, (more like a twitch).
This imparts a fluttering motion in the current, as if the insect was swimming to the surface.

I used this method at the end of the drift, through the seams and pockets if no strikes were triggered from the natural drift rise from the line tightening.

The added movement some times triggers a strike, while moving up stream.
And these strikes are usually hard hits!

Also think about depth, in faster currents, fish are close to the bottom, so getting your nymph in the feeding depth is important. I usually use a split shot to get the nymph down, but you can also add weight while tyeing the pattern with wire or lead free material now available.

Hope this helps.

TP

The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.

Larry

I will certainly try both of the tips that you guys listed. I have actually caught a couple at the end of the drift when I was starting to pull the nymph out of the water. Thanks for the help.

Larry


Psycho_Fisher

Quote from: Larry on January 28, 2007, 11:06:12 AM

I've been fly fishing for a while, but have only gotton serious about nymphing in the last year. I just read some information in "Pocket Guide to Nymph Fishing" that  talks about the movements  of nymphs under water. As I have only  utilized the dead drift, I wonder if I am completely  missing something. Should some type of movement be imparted to nymphs when you are fishing them and, if so, what type of movement should be utilized?

Any thoughts or suggestions that any one  this about this would be appreciated.

Larry

Hey... bunch of great advise.

Where are you fishing, Larry?  Free-stone?  Tailwater?  Wild?  Stocked?

Tight Lines & Put-Em-Back!

streamer

Quote from: Woolly Bugger on January 28, 2007, 11:37:11 AM

At then end of a drift let the fly line drift downstream until it straightens in the current the nymph will rise up at the end of the drift and you will be surprised how many hits you'll get right at the very last moment as the fish follow the nymph up through the water column. This rise is named after somebody who's name starts with "L" like Lessering rise.

http://www.orvis.com/intro.asp?subject=566&bhcp=1

http://www.flyfishinggear.info/how_to/nymph-fishing-basic-methods.shtm

Here's a like to a pretty cool video of the Bounce Technique....

http://www.fliesandfinswest.com/article603.html

Leisenring Lift. Learn it. Love it. Live it.
Streamer
Remember...We all live downstream.

Larry

Psychofisher,

All of the above. I just retired and am trying to catch up on all the fishing I missed because of work and family . Since it became obvious that I was not going to catch much at sometimes of the year without learning to nymph fish, that is what I am currently  working  on.

Larry


Bluetick1955

A Dumb Question :P

Do wade downstream or upstream when nymphing?


phg

I do both, actually.  It depends on a lot of things.  I generally have my best luck when casting across and quartering downstream, but there have also been times when I did very  well casting upstream and letting it come back to me on the dead drift.  Generally, if I am nymphing upstream, I use a strike indicator.  If I am working across and down stream, I work without an indicator. 


Trout Maharishi

Sight fishing with nymphs is almost as much fun as fishing dry flies. If you can actually see the fish try using the Leisenring Lift as your fly gets in front of the fish. I follow the drift of the nymph with my rod tip as the fly drifts down stream. If I want the fly to rise up in the water column, I just stop my rod and let the current pull the slack out and make the fly rise in front of the fish. Put on a very large or colorful nymph you can see and practice making it rise and fall in the current. What I call the "sudden inch" method is deadly 8)

There's more B.S. in fly fishing than there is in a Kansas feedlot.

Lefty Kreh

troutphisher

Quote

A Dumb Question :P

Do wade downstream or upstream when nymphing?

Both, but by far, nymphing upstream is the most difficult, especially with out an indicator. I had some good advice given to me by AL (absales). I used to try and fish directly up stream, straight line up. This proved to be very difficult in keeping the line tension tight. Al suggested casting at an angle and this helped.

Up stream nymphing is very challenging, but also very satisfying when you hook up! The fish is facing into the current, so getting into position to cast to it, is not as difficult, the fish can't see you as well. Placing the fly in the feeding lane is the most difficult part, with out spooking the fish with leader or line.

The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.

trout_boy_II

I think I mentioned this before and I'm beginning to think I should formally become his agent or something, but check out the articles "Lee Dawg" posted at another, seldom followed board:

http://www.flyfishsouth.com/forum/showfaq.asp?fldAuto=4

Some real good stuff in there that has helped me in the past.  Add that to what you've already been told above and you should have a good start.

Regards.

TB


Bluetick1955

Thanks guys. I don't get to go often and am fairly new to the sport. At my old age hard to learn new tricks ;D


troutphisher

February 05, 2007, 21:53:20 PM #13 Last Edit: February 05, 2007, 21:56:06 PM by troutphisher
Quote

Never so much B.S. on the BRFFF, how bout indicator color and a lill prayer session. Even bradDICK tried to be normal.

Merciful Jesus, pardon me while I puke.

And It only took you 8 days to drum up your words of wisdom in retort!
Although I find some truths in your observations, even if the reply was late in coming, it is forthright.
The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.


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