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Misc Fishing News

Started by Onslow, May 07, 2022, 18:08:00 PM

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Onslow

In 2018, the first Kentucky Spotted or Alabama bass was caught in the New River watershed in NC.  The fish was caught on the Middle Fork New in Boone of all places. This from the NCDEQ.  I just hope the browns in said stream will eat them.


streamereater_101691

Ken, the Kentucky spotted bass and Alabama spotted bass are different. Yes, they are closely related in looks and genetic, but Alabama's are much more aggressive and will hybridize with smallies. Kentucky spotted bass have slower growth cycles and are less aggressive. Alabama bass are native to the coosa river.


Onslow

#2
Quote from: streamereater_101691 on May 07, 2022, 20:08:15 PM

Ken, the Kentucky spotted bass and Alabama spotted bass are different. Yes, they are closely related in looks and genetic, but Alabama's are much more aggressive and will hybridize with smallies. Kentucky spotted bass have slower growth cycles and are less aggressive. Alabama bass are native to the coosa river.

Yes, the NCDEQ did not take the fish to the lab to confirm genetics.

Kentucky spots are very aggressive as well, and spread like wildfire.  I don't recall exactly when they were stocked in the Yadkin basin near Kerr Scott, maybe 1984, but by 2010, they had spread to down to the South Yadkin, then migrated/established up Hunting creek to Eagle Mill.  That is quite a feat, probably more than 150 stream miles. A 15" spot is a solid fish for the Yadkin whereas 18 inch smallmouth used to be common in the Yadkin. Spots in the Roaring and Mitchell river rarely get over 10".

Kentucky spots were stocked in the Avents and Parker Creek (Cape Fear tribs), and now largemouth are almost non existent in that part of the watershed. The worst aspect of Kentucky spots is their small size.  All they do is infest, and displace, but do not attain much size. Imo, they are a worse scourge than the Alabama bass.   The Cape Fear used to produce lots of largemouth up to 7 pounds.  This is around Lillington and Erwin.  This is a beautiful rocky river with flyfishing potential, and now is a bag of shit.

Roanoke bass were stocked in the Deep River watershed in Buffalo Creek, Fall Creek, Richland Creek, and to this day, they have not really moved far away from Coleridge and High Falls.  At least the Roanokes in the Deep river reach beast size.


Mudwall Gatewood 3.0

Fretting over introduced species in our waters, or anywhere, will drive one looney.  Heck, I have no idea of the smallmouth original range.  I'm pretty sure the smallmouth in nearby Back Creek are not native, and now we have rainbows all the way to headwaters of Little Back, a brookie stream.  We have transformed and renovated the entire planet.  Slowing the process may be our only option; reversing or undoing our mistakes seems impossible.

Nonnative browns eating nonnative bass, rich.  There must be a word for nonnatives regulating and manipulating nonnatives.  If not, there should be.

"Enjoy every sandwich."  Warren Zevon

Woolly Bugger

#4
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on May 08, 2022, 09:31:11 AM

We have transformed and renovated the entire planet.  Slowing the process may be our only option; reversing or undoing our mistakes seems impossible.

'Plant out of hell' invading south Alabama, feds weigh using Asian insects to fight back

>>>In the battle against an invasive tree that's taking over the Mobile-Tensaw Delta, federal authorities are considering a new weapon: invasive insects.

State and federal wildlife agencies have tried blasting the invasive Chinese tallow tree with herbicide dropped from the air, in addition to using controlled burns, U.S. Marines with machetes, and brigades of volunteers to fight back the invasion.

But the proposal has drawn waves of opposition from a somewhat unlikely source: beekeepers.

More than 900 public comments were filed in response to the proposal in the U.S. Federal Register, including comments in opposition from the American Beekeepers Association, the American Farm Bureau Federation, state and local beekeepers groups and hundreds of individual beekeepers who value the tallow tree because it is attractive to bees.

None of those controls seem to be working, and they're all very expensive, so the U.S. Department of Agriculture is currently evaluating a proposal to release two insects from Asia – a moth and a beetle -- that are natural predators for the tallow tree.

https://www.al.com/news/2022/05/plant-out-of-hell-invading-south-alabama-feds-weigh-using-asian-insects-to-fight-back.html
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