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Historic Trails

Started by Onslow, June 20, 2021, 08:31:58 AM

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Onslow

June 20, 2021, 08:31:58 AM Last Edit: June 20, 2021, 09:04:15 AM by Onslow

This thread is intended to benefit those who try to make sense of the world we inhabit, and desire to learn from history. I is also for those who love the land we walk upon.

I'll post up some stuff this August. Wife and I will be studying Native American removal efforts at the hands of the US.  Most of the time will be spent at the designated Indian lands in western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma, but visiting certain points along the Trail of Tears will be visited as well.  All Americans should take our grown children on this journey.

If you have taken the Oregon Trail, Lewis & Clark, hiked Donner Pass, Overmountain Victory, Butterfield, Underground Railroad, and have experiences you don't mind sharing, please do so. If you've camped in the shadows of Scotts Bluff, and witnessed both the sunrise and sunset, post some pics!


Mudwall Gatewood 3.0

Interesting idea; I like it!

I have traveled hundreds of times a very small segment of Simon Kenton's historical journey --- from Warm Springs where he assumed the name of Simon Butler, across Deer River (now the Jackson River), across Backaway Creek (now Back Creek), across the Allegheny front to the Greenbrier River.

The historical game and indigenous trails of the Appalachians are captivating.

I don't know if the trails will help us make sense of the world we currently inhabit, but it will be darned fun to imagine and daydream.

"Enjoy every sandwich."  Warren Zevon

Onslow

August 08, 2021, 06:38:23 AM #2 Last Edit: August 08, 2021, 09:01:08 AM by Onslow

Walking in the Footsteps

Dinosaur Valley State Park, Glen Rose Texas.

Glenn Rose is a small town about an hour south of Fort Worth.  The Hico-Glenn Rose area is a neat area with much to offer for those wanting to get away from the sprawl of Austin and Dallas-Fort Worth.  Cool stores, good eats, and a completely disconnected-from-world vibe. The downside is peeps here really don't care covid exists.

Local swim hole at Glenn Rose

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State park

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Chill turtle

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So all of the track sites are easily accessed.  There are parking areas near all except one. Many of the tracks have also been removed to be studied years ago, but there are plenty left.

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Wild oats

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Some of the trails are not suited for people with mobility issues

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Redbreast on a bed next to a track.

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Native Texas prairie grass

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The scenic Paluxy River.  Streams in this part of the world are inhabited by Largemouth, Guadeloupe Bass, Catfish, Green Sunfish, Redbreast.  Many of the larger streams and rivers hold white bass in good numbers. Most of the streams in the Foothills which extend from south of Fort Worth, down to Austin and San Antonio are rocky in many areas, and punctuated by large pools.  Even small creeks like Bennetts (Lampassas trib near Evant) hold bass over two pounds.

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I had intended to fish some water here, and on Cowhouse Creek, and the Lampassas, but my time was needed elsewhere.


Woolly Bugger

August 08, 2021, 07:18:36 AM #3 Last Edit: August 08, 2021, 07:21:27 AM by Woolly Bugger

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pretty cool there Ken... did you fish any?

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Onslow

Keith, I did not.  I brought a rod, but after my sis showed a vid of her nephew fishing Bennetts Creek near Evant, and not catching any 'loupes, apathy settled in. In hindsight, I should've went back to the park to fish the Paluxy.  I'm pretty sure I saw a Guadeloupe bass in one of the holes.

I spent most of my time with my mom.  She is currently afflicted with dementia.


Trout Maharishi

August 08, 2021, 22:51:13 PM #5 Last Edit: August 08, 2021, 22:55:40 PM by Trout Maharishi

Pretty cool stuff, I've seen similar footprints and stuff in WY. As important as fishing is in our lives it's not even close when it comes to your friends and family. Keep spending time with your Mom. You won't regret it in the end. I went through it with my dad and it became uncomfortable to visit him when he didn't even know my name most days, so I stopped going to see him as often as I once did. I regret I did that, it was a big mistake.

There's more B.S. in fly fishing than there is in a Kansas feedlot.

Lefty Kreh

troutrus

Have come across many sites designated with Lewis and Clark labels. In many of the areas we used to fish out west, Lewis and Clark are mentioned with a voracity similar to that of the "George Washington Slept Here" claims of the northeast.

The spot pictured is on the Beaverhead River tailwater below a lake system that now covers Camp Fortunate, a notorious hangout of those explorers, where they were said to be working out deals with Native American tribes.

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troutrus

August 11, 2021, 07:11:23 AM #7 Last Edit: August 11, 2021, 07:18:30 AM by troutrus

I've spent hours walking along Riverside Park in Tulsa and observing the fishermen on and around the pedestrian bridge up around 30th st. There were some well hidden historical markers in the area referring to the relocation of Creek People from one side of the river to the other after oil was discovered on the land where they had been originally relocated. Many moons later the city kissed and made up by permitting a Creek Casino up around 83rd and Riverside. 🤔


troutrus

Quote from: Onslow on June 20, 2021, 08:31:58 AM

This thread is intended to benefit those who try to make sense of the world we inhabit, and desire to learn from history. I is also for those who love the land we walk upon.

I'll post up some stuff this August. Wife and I will be studying Native American removal efforts at the hands of the US.  Most of the time will be spent at the designated Indian lands in western Arkansas and eastern Oklahoma, but visiting certain points along the Trail of Tears will be visited as well.

* All Americans should take our grown children on this journey.

Darn shame the public school systems don't do a better job of teaching American History (good and bad) so that our grown children might be better prepared for such a journey.



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