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unlimited odds and ends

Started by Woolly Bugger, September 13, 2020, 08:28:51 AM

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Onslow

A new apple called Ludicrisp developed by a consortium of growers who prefer to sell apples not necessarily suited for grocery store chains, but more for farmers market and u pick operations. It may be a while before we see these in NC.  The flavor description seems to be more in line with a Royal Limbertwig or something perhaps even more unusual.

https://www.freshforwardfarms.com/ludacrisp-apples-fast-facts-about-the-latest-apple-variety/

https://youtu.be/mZQl5rr6xpI?feature=shared

FYI, all of the Wilson Orchard vids are interesting.

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Quail Hill Farm
178 Acres Protected along the Mitchell River

These days, farmers see many high value offers to buy their land – to develop residential neighborhoods, to install utility scale solar farms, and lots more. While these are not bad things on their own, these immense pressures to sell are part of why we are losing farmland and open space at the largest scale and fastest pace yet. According to a 2016 report done by American Farmland Trust, North Carolina "will convert 11.6% of its agricultural land—nearly 1.2 million acres—to subdivisions, strip malls, and scattered rural housing" by 2040. This is the second fastest farmland loss in the nation after Texas.

Tracy Hayes has seen many of these offers, but always refused. He had something different in mind. As of October 2023, 178 acres of Quail Hill Farm are now permanently protected by a conservation agreement with Piedmont Land Conservancy. That means this land can never be developed or subdivided.

Tracy first protected 9.5 acres in 2001 and 11 acres in 2005 as part of the early Mitchell River Coalition efforts, both of which were buffers along the Mitchell River. This year he expanded that protection extensively.

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https://www.piedmontland.org/2023/11/17/quailhillfarmprotected/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Opinion: How a few days in the wild can expose our wasteful habits
It's amazing to realize how fragile our luxuries are.

Guides in the outdoor industry inevitably come up with collective nicknames for customers. On horseback they're "dudes," on the river they're "mers" — short for customers — and they're "sticks" if you're trying to trick a trout. Sometimes the terms trend a little negative — "flatlander" comes to mind, and there's another name I've come to use but need to explain it.

It comes out of what I do: For the last decade, I've guided multi-day whitewater fly-fishing trips through western Colorado's Gunnison Gorge during the summer. Then I spend the fall guiding horseback hunting outfits in wilderness. It adds up to around 100 nights a year sleeping rough.

I've met a lot of people from all over the country, and, sad to say, too many seem oblivious to how scarce clean water is in the outback and also how much work it takes to make water safe for drinking. That's why I sometimes call them "water poopers."

https://www.sltrib.com/opinion/commentary/2023/11/25/opinion-how-few-days-wild-can/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

It's furry, it's fierce — and in much of the U.S., it's now protected
Wolverines in the Lower 48 are set to be protected under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Wednesday


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It's furry, it's fierce — and it's served as inspiration for sports mascots in Michigan and beyond.

But now in much of the United States, the wolverine is at risk of disappearing as the climate warms, prompting federal wildlife officials to protect the animal under the Endangered Species Act.

https://wapo.st/3sMj64l
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Three American Climbers Solve the 'Last Great Problem in the Himalayas'
Scaling Mount Jannu's north face without fixed ropes or oxygen was "the greatest climb ever," one expert said, far more difficult than reaching the summit of Everest.

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Three American climbers lay in the dark, sharing a custom-made sleeping bag on a portable ledge dangling from a massive cliff high in the Himalayas. They were anchored to the north face of Mount Jannu, one of the world's biggest, sheerest rock walls.

The void below them was 10,000 feet of thin black air. Above them, within reach, was something most people can only imagine.

"I know we still have a lot to do," Alan Rousseau said to his two fellow climbers. "But I feel like we just did something cool."

The next day, Rousseau, Matt Cornell and Jackson Marvell — little known outside of climbing circles, for the moment — stood at Jannu's summit. Before them were the white tips of other major peaks, including Everest and Kangchenjunga.


Continue Reading at the NY Times https://www.nytimes.com/2023/12/01/us/climbing-jannu-north-face.html?unlocked_article_code=1.DU0.LqFR.fQlkgBdFSIo2&hpgrp=k-abar&smid=url-share
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Onslow

Just when I thought I could bust for fishing today, this letter is hand delivered by town management Sunday.

You cannot view this attachment.

 :laugh:

Now we're guilted into entertaining peeps from the hinterlands riding on haybuggies.

trout-r-us

Quote from: Onslow on December 04, 2023, 09:30:45 AMJust when I thought I could bust for fishing today, this letter is hand delivered by town management Sunday.

 :laugh:

Now we're guilted into entertaining peeps from the hinterlands riding on haybuggies.

Enjoy!
The joy of small town living.
Any minor inconvenience is more than offset by not having to contend with the masses of asses in the big city.
"No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man."
― Heraclitus

trout-r-us

To those who light the hanukkiah, happy holidays.
"No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man."
― Heraclitus

Onslow

This person is spot on.  Greta is not. Reducing CO2 will do nothing for humanity if deforestation and soil depletion persists at the current rate.



QuoteThe save the soil movement Bringing humanity together to keep magic of soil alive says Sadhguru
Documentary film being played at the Save Soil press conference at The Claridges hotel in New Delhi, on Sunday. F
Stakeholders of both private and government sectors have come in support of the Save Soil campaign.

After the two documentaries, Sadhguru took the questions of the press.


When asked about the challenges he had to face during his journey, he said everyone was walking with him in the journey as nobody can really argue on soil being the source of human life.

When asked about the response he garnered from the nations that he visited, the Isha Foundation founder told about the many MOUs that he signed with governments of various nations. He also said that the United Nations has also come in support of the Save Soil movement.

One of the journalists asked Sadhguru why he chose to ride a bike and not any other vehicle, Sadhguru responded by saying that there was no better way than riding a motorcycle to maintain social distancing in view of the COVID-19 pandemic.

He added, "If I flew my city to city by an airline, do you think it would excite anybody's interest if I drive a car then no. If I walked then it may be... I would kill myself probably. If I ride a bicycle, maybe a sure death. The motorcycle is near death but not death. If you make a mistake, you could die. There are many dangerous moments out there."

When asked if he enjoy riding a bike, the 64-year-old said, "I don't enjoy anything in my life. I am just joyful."

As per Sadhguru, agriculture, deforestation, and other factors have degraded and eroded topsoil at alarming rates. Globally, 52% of agricultural land is already degraded. The planet is in crisis, if current rates of soil degradation continue, this would be the end of life as we know it, he added.

Almost every major ecological crisis is, to some degree or form, a consequence or symptom of the degradation of soil. Similarly, almost every environmental or environment-related pain point can be addressed by creating healthy soil.

Highlighting the importance of enhancing the organic content of soil, he said, "As the soil becomes rich, the usage of pesticides, chemicals, and fertilizers will start sliding down. That is how it should happen. Not the other way round, because we do not like chemicals, we say remove them. If you do that, you cannot provide food to 8 billion people. Without fertilizers, you cannot do it right now. We are not in that condition. Soil is not in that condition anywhere. If you raise your organic content to 12 to 15 per cent, then maybe it is possible to think of raising food output without chemical fertilizer."

"But I am not such a stickler against chemical fertilizer at all. If you have to use it a little bit, use it. It just has to be used in a doctored manner. Right now, it is being used extensively because the soil is so poor. It is like if you are eating good food and you are healthy, maybe you take one Vitamin pill. But now you are seriously ill, now all sorts of stuff are being pumped into you all the time. That is the state of a sick person and sick soil right now," he stated.

Woolly Bugger

Quote from: Onslow on December 10, 2023, 09:30:27 AMThis person is spot on.  Greta is not. Reducing CO2 will do nothing for humanity if deforestation and soil depletion persists at the current rate.


Carbon removal technology: How far have we come and what does the future hold?

Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd and Chris Bentley visited locations across the U.S. to understand how carbon removal technology is working to reverse some effects of climate change. They unpack the promising future of this technology and the limitations of it.

And, O'Dowd reports on carbon capture technology that sucks CO2 directly from the air and stores it in concrete used to make buildings, roads and more. While it's certainly helpful in the fight against climate change, critics say it doesn't go far enough.

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Don Walsh, Navy officer who reached ocean's deepest spot, dies at 92
The mission in January 1960 reached the seabed more than 6.7 miles down and opened frontiers in deep-sea exploration.

The depth gauge counted off the descent through the inky ocean darkness: 29,000 feet, 30,000 feet, 31,000 feet.

At nearly 32,400 feet into the Pacific's Mariana Trench, a muffled bang jolted the bathyscaph Trieste. The two men on board froze in dread. The water pressure at this depth was nearing eight tons per square inch. Any breach in the structure would be the end. Another moment passed. Nothing more.

What they didn't know at the time was that one layer of acrylic glass in a viewing port had cracked because of a shifting metal fixture. The rest held. "We decided to proceed," recalled Don Walsh, then a Navy lieutenant, who joined Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard on the mission.

Deeper still: 33,000 feet, 35,000 feet. Nearly five hours after leaving the surface on Jan. 23, 1960, the Trieste sensors detected the seabed: the deepest point in all the oceans, known as the Challenger Deep. The descent stopped at about 35,800 feet. The craft's lights lit up the silty flats at more than 6.7 miles down. They were the first humans to set eyes on it.

https://wapo.st/46UT8t4
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Onslow

Everyone in NC should become familiar with ch. 113A article 4 of the General Statutes.

You cannot view this attachment.

Woolly Bugger

The WW1 Christmas Truce: 'The war, for that moment, came to a standstill'

During the bleak winter of 1914, amid the mud, blood and chaos of World War One, an extraordinary series of ceasefires spontaneously occurred along the Western Front. In the 1960s the BBC spoke to some of the men who, over that exceptional Christmas period, decided to lay down their arms.
On Christmas Eve 1914, Rifleman Graham Williams, of the 5th London Rifle Brigade, stood out on sentry duty staring out anxiously across the wasteland of no man's land to the German trenches. He had already endured months of the brutal violence, bloodshed and destruction that would come to characterise World War One, when something remarkable happened.
"All of a sudden, lights appeared along the German trench. And I thought this is a funny thing. And then the Germans started singing 'Stille Nacht, heilige Nacht'. And I woke up, and all the sentries did the same thing, all woke up the other people to come along and see this and what the Earth is going on," he recalled, in the BBC radio show Witness History


https://bbc.com/culture/article/20231219-the-ww1-christmas-truce-the-war-for-that-moment-came-to-a-standstill
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

He spent his life building a $1 million stereo. The real cost was unfathomable.
Ken Fritz turned his home into an audiophile's dream — the world's greatest hi-fi. What would it mean in the end?

Ken Fritz was years into his quest to build the world's greatest stereo when he realized it would take more than just gear.

It would take more than the Krell amplifiers and the Ampex reel-to-reel. More than the trio of 10-foot speakers he envisioned crafting by hand.

And it would take more than what would come to be the crown jewel of his entire system: the $50,000 custom record player, his "Frankentable," nestled in a 1,500-pound base designed to thwart any needle-jarring vibrations and equipped with three different tone arms, each calibrated to coax a different sound from the same slab of vinyl.







https://wapo.st/47ErwZI
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!