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unlimited odds and ends

Started by Woolly Bugger, September 13, 2020, 08:28:51 AM

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Woolly Bugger

Scientists reveal how many ants there are across the entire planet: 20,000,000,000,000,000!

https://studyfinds.org/how-many-ants-on-earth/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

trout-r-us

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Onslow

Dave's annual open house is the first two Saturdays of November.  I've been buying trees apple trees from Dave off an on since 2004.

https://www.centuryfarmorchards.com/

Woolly Bugger

Ancient eel migration mystery unravelled

Scientists have unravelled a mystery surrounding one of nature's most incredible journeys.

Every year, eels leave European rivers to travel in an epic migration to the Sargasso Sea in the North Atlantic to breed for a single time, then die.

Although this final destination has long been suspected, until now there has been no direct evidence.

By fitting eels with satellite tags, researchers have tracked the creatures on the final leg of the route.

And they say the information will help in the conservation of the critically endangered species.


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https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-63259738

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Onslow

Quote from: trout-r-us on October 03, 2022, 14:59:09 PMYou cannot view this attachment.

I've only been to starbucks once.  Highly evolved peeps don't go there :P


Woolly Bugger

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — It was a crisp fall day when biologist Bernie Kuhajda drove to a nondescript trickle of water running through a Middle Tennessee cow pasture to try to keep a small, brightly colored fish from becoming extinct.

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https://nypost.com/2022/10/21/tiny-tennessee-fish-protected-but-us-has-yet-to-say-where/?utm_campaign=iphone_nyp&utm_source=pasteboard_app

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

What the World Will Lose if Ancient Trees Die Out

Old trees are in big trouble.

Whole forests with fire-resistant giant sequoias up to 3,000 years in age have recently gone up in flames. Whole stands of drought-resistant Great Basin bristlecone pine, a species that can reach 5,000 years in age, have been sucked dry by bark beetles. Monumental baobabs, the longest-living flowering plants, buckle under the stress of drought in southern Africa. The iconic cedars of Mount Lebanon, ancient symbols of longevity, struggle in warmer, drier conditions. Millennial kauris in New Zealand and centenarian olive trees in Italy succumb to invasive diseases.

Cumulatively, this is more than a cyclical turnover. This is a great diminution: fewer megaflora (massive trees), fewer elderflora (ancient trees), fewer old-growth forests, fewer ancient species, fewer species overall.

Although Earth's "tree cover" — three trillion plants covering roughly 30 percent of all land — has expanded of late, the canopy increasingly consists of trees planted for timber, paper pulp and cooking oil and for services such as protecting soil from wind erosion and offsetting carbon emissions. It's young stuff. Old-growth communities are scarce and getting scarcer.



https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/20/opinion/environment/ancient-trees-sequoia-climate-change.html



Old trees have much to teach us

An expansive global history explores humanity's vexed relationship with venerable plants.


Elderflora: A Modern History of Ancient Trees Jared Farmer Basic (2022)


About 45 million years ago, when the Arctic was ice-free, the world's earliest known mummified trees flourished on what is now Axel Heiberg Island in Canada's Qikiqtaaluk Region. In 1986, palaeobotanists identified the megaflora as members of Metasequoia occidentalis, an extinct redwood species. They had been buried in silt, then frozen, their wood preserved.

The lead palaeontologist "celebrated his eureka by kindling a fire with 45-million-year-old twigs and boiling water for tea time," writes historian Jared Farmer in Elderflora, his expansive global history of grand and venerable trees. Granted, these plants had been dead since the Eocene epoch. Nevertheless, as the author describes, the incident is part of a troubling pattern in which scientists rejoice at their discovery of the 'oldest' tree of their time — and then destroy it.


https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-022-03393-1
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

#322
Climate change threatening 'things Americans value most,' U.S. report says

>>>Climate change is unleashing "far-reaching and worsening" calamities in every region of the United States, and the economic and human toll will only increase unless humans move faster to slow the planet's warming, according to a sprawling new federal report released Monday.

>>>"Over the past 50 years, the U.S. has warmed 68 percent faster than the planet as a whole," the report finds, noting that the change reflects a broader global pattern in which land areas warm faster than the ocean, and higher latitudes warm more rapidly than lower latitudes.

Since 1970, the authors state, the continental United States has experienced 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit of warming, well above the average for the planet.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/climate-environment/2022/11/07/cop27-climate-change-report-us/

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ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Phil

I can't hit "like" on that. We're screwed with a capital "F."  :o  b';

Woolly Bugger

#324

Runway Rubber Removal


ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Washington Post - Interactive story of the population growth of the world

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/interactive/2022/world-population-8-billion/?itid=hp-top-table-main_p001_f003


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ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

trout-r-us

Sad situation. 🙁

"Absent any meaningful water quality improvements in the short term, feeding manatees this winter is the right thing to do, according to Pat Rose, an aquatic biologist and executive director of the Maitland-based Save the Manatee Club. But remember: It's illegal for the public to feed wild manatees."

"There is no excuse for this die-off to get to where it is. It was well-understood for years that this system was undergoing serious changes with one algal bloom after another," Rose said in an interview. But as overly thin manatees continue to succumb to a lack of forage, feeding is a smart decision — so long as other efforts, like ecosystem restoration, continue at the same time, Rose said."

"We are so far behind the eight-ball that it's going to take so much more to help these animals," Rose said. "But we can't just allow hundreds more manatees to go through this agonizing death like others before them."

https://www.tampabay.com/news/florida/2022/11/16/florida-manatees-feeding-program-indian-river-lagoon/
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