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Unlimited Fly Fishing News and Articles...

Started by Woolly Bugger, July 01, 2019, 12:09:51 PM

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Woolly Bugger

Meet the Penn State deans: Richard Roush talks fishing, ice cream — and immortality


>>As part of a collaborative effort with Penn State, which is releasing a monthly video on school deans and their perspectives and passions, the Centre Daily Times is continuing a lighthearted Q&A series that highlights a different dean every month in the hopes the local community gets to know them outside of the classroom. Up next: Richard Roush, dean of Penn State College of Agricultural Sciences. Roush, who holds a doctorate from Cal Berkeley, joined Penn State in 2014. He is internationally recognized for research into insect pests and weeds, and his most recent published work came on the spotted laternfly. He previously served as the University of Melbourne's dean of the School of Land and Environment, and he's currently focused on key issues such as water quality and job development. He also loves fishing, whether it's fly-fishing in local waterways, deep-sea fishing on the West Coast or wherever else.

Read more at: https://www.centredaily.com/news/local/education/penn-state/article260306825.html#storylink=cpy


ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Dougfish

I feel much better about my casting after watching that.  :laugh:
"Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change? " -Oddball, 1970

"I don't wanna go to hell,
But if I do,
It'll be 'cause of you..."
Strange Desire, The Black Keys, 2006

Woolly Bugger

Quote from: Woolly Bugger on April 05, 2022, 08:56:13 AMFor 76 years, this man made a living as a fishing guide in an iconic Canadian park

Frank Kuiack is the last traditional fishing guide in Ontario's Algonquin Park.

Kuiack is a time capsule of a bygone era, carrying a wealth of stories behind each wrinkle on his face. He generously shares his knowledge with anyone who journeys into the park.

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https://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/short-docs/for-76-years-this-man-made-a-living-as-a-fishing-guide-in-an-iconic-canadian-park-1.6391994

Great short video but you'll need a VPN (canada server) to watch...

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Dee-Vo

Quote from: Woolly Bugger on May 04, 2022, 23:16:17 PM
Quote from: Woolly Bugger on April 05, 2022, 08:56:13 AMFor 76 years, this man made a living as a fishing guide in an iconic Canadian park

Frank Kuiack is the last traditional fishing guide in Ontario's Algonquin Park.

Kuiack is a time capsule of a bygone era, carrying a wealth of stories behind each wrinkle on his face. He generously shares his knowledge with anyone who journeys into the park.

Guests are not allowed to view images in posts, please Register or Login

https://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/short-docs/for-76-years-this-man-made-a-living-as-a-fishing-guide-in-an-iconic-canadian-park-1.6391994

Great short video but you'll need a VPN (canada server) to watch...



Thanks for posting this. Seen it somewhere the other day and forgot to go back to it to watch.

Dee-Vo


Phil

Good morning watch. Thanks, Dee-Vo!  :cheers

Phil

#141
The long-haired Swedish (or wherever he was from)dude in the video was a very well-equipped "trout bum." Lotso money worth of gear he was a-carrying....  :o

Woolly Bugger

Murray's Fly Shop celebrates six decades in Edinburg


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>>>Harry Murray remembers tying fishing flies in the back of his drugstore in Edinburg between filling prescriptions back in 1962.

Fresh out of college, Murray kept both business and pleasure close by. Most of his business space was for the pharmacy, but he maintained a small portion of the shop for fly-fishing equipment.

Six decades later, the drugstore is no more. But Murray's Fly Shop is still going strong.

https://www.nvdaily.com/nvdaily/murrays-fly-shop-celebrates-six-decades-in-edinburg/article_a3b4fe80-754d-5ec9-b6aa-8366875c8edf.html
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

#143
Shock on the South Fork: Rainbow eradication stirs controversy


>>>As anglers take to the water this year, they will again share the South Fork of the Snake River with Idaho Department of Fish and Game crews electroshocking fish in an effort to boost native cutthroat trout numbers.

Fish and Game began removing non-native rainbow and rainbow/cutthroat hybrids called "cutbows" in the spring of 2018 as part of a new management strategy based, in part, on 2017 angler surveys. According to Fish and Game Regional Fisheries Biologist Patrick Kennedy, the state surveys anglers every five years to determine what management strategies the public wants to see. And protecting native cutthroat topped the list.

In the early 2000s the department documented declining cutthroat numbers, while rainbow and cutbow populations showed steady growth. The agency changed rules on the South Fork to try to motivate anglers to harvest the non-native species, opening the river to a year-round season and offering anglers no limit on the non-natives.


>>>"These aggressive shocking tactics are a result of the widespread belief that efforts to date have not been successful enough, and the battle to protect native cutthroat is being lost. It's a desperate attempt by biologists and IDFG to stop a non-native species from stealing the soul of our mighty South Fork."

https://www.jhnewsandguide.com/sports/features/shock-on-the-south-fork-rainbow-eradication-divides-anglers/article_c1dba4db-8051-5180-a0be-de41c5edeb7d.html
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

The lure of fishing

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>>>A few years back two of Tom More Smith's children gave him a piece of paper with five words on it: "I'll go fishing with you." It was the best birthday present ever," he recalls. "I don't need a thing but fishing with my kids is special. My grandson, Will, is my fishing buddy. He and I are thick as thieves. We'll play hooky and go fishing. It's a very special bond."

Growing up in Illinois, Smith's junior high school friends fished and he was curious. Not surprisingly, for someone who grew up to be a finance professor at Emory Goizueta Business School, he went to his town's library, studied Field and Stream magazines and then asked his dad to take him fishing.


https://www.ajc.com/things-to-do/the-lure-of-fishing/ROYIKNAGXNFOPEJKBT24EHOKBU/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

The Tale of the Trojan Trout
Can the introduction of a modified invader save the West's native fish?

>>>On a golden morning in early October, two graduate students from New Mexico State University plunge into the icy current of Leandro Creek. The small waterway flows through the 550,000-acre Vermejo Park Ranch, a reserve in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico. Today, the crew will trace the stream's course toward its headwaters on the flanks of a volcanic cone called Ash Mountain, in search of an unusual fish.

Kelsie Field, 25, a graduate student in the Department of Wildlife and Conservation Ecology wears a pair of worn gray waders and totes two 8-gallon buckets, one full of water, the other, of scientific gear—test tubes, an electronic scanner, surgical implements. Michael Miller, 30, a fellow graduate student in the same department, also clad in waders, shoulders a large, waterproof backpack containing a battery attached to an electrode that resembles a metal detector like those used by treasure hunters.

This, Miller dips into the creek, squeezing the handle to send some 300 volts through the water. While the crew's rubber boots insulate them from the shock, the resident fish are exposed to the electrical current. Stunned, they drift to the surface just long enough for Miller to net them and deposit them in Field's bucket. Most measure around 10 inches. Some are no larger than a pinky. Occasionally, though, Miller's handle bends sharply as he nets a hunchbacked specimen of 16 inches or more—apex predators gorged on smaller fish, in this waterway scarcely wider than a city sidewalk.

There are just two species here. One is an embattled native, the Rio Grande cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki virginalis), distinguished by its cream-colored skin, mottling of black spots and a vibrant orange slash under the jaw. Once widely distributed in rivers and streams across northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, the Rio Grande cutthroat is now found across a mere 10 percent of its historical range. And like others among the dozen or so subspecies of cutthroat trout in the western United States, today it's reeling under the pressures of climate change, habitat loss, and—in the case of Leandro Creek—a hardy intruder.


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>>>That's because many are a lab-produced variety known as "Trojan" brook trout. They are unique in that they carry not one, but two copies of the Y chromosome that codes maleness; they have no X chromosome to pass on. Unlike many creatures, including humans, fish can survive without an X, and seem unimpaired by the lack. And since 2018, Miller, the lead researcher on the project, and his predecessors have been carrying out a bold new experiment, stocking various streams across the Vermejo reserve with this strain in an attempt to tilt the brook trout sex ratio so far male that eventually the population will stop breeding and blink out on its own. Similar efforts are also underway in a handful of creeks in Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, and Nevada plans to embark on its own stocking program this summer.






https://www.biographic.com/the-tale-of-the-trojan-trout/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

#146
Williamsburg Elementary students raised trout and released them

Ruth Robertson, a fourth grade teacher at Williamsburg Elementary, admits that most of her students do not particularly like to write, but she found an activity that not only piqued their interest but got them excited about putting pen to paper.

Since 2015, Robertson and her students have participated in the "Trout in the Classroom," a program sponsored by the Dan River Basin Association and Trout Unlimited.

Students raise baby trout, care for them in their classroom and then release them into the Smith River. While parenting their fish, they not only learn about science but other subjects as well.

"I do this project with my students because it motivates them to become involved and teaches them responsibility," Robertson said. "Students that don't like to write love to write about their baby trout."uth Robertson, a fourth grade teacher at Williamsburg Elementary, admits that most of her students do not particularly like to write, but she found an activity that not only piqued their interest but got them excited about putting pen to paper.

Since 2015, Robertson and her students have participated in the "Trout in the Classroom," a program sponsored by the Dan River Basin Association and Trout Unlimited.

Students raise baby trout, care for them in their classroom and then release them into the Smith River. While parenting their fish, they not only learn about science but other subjects as well.

"I do this project with my students because it motivates them to become involved and teaches them responsibility," Robertson said. "Students that don't like to write love to write about their baby trout."


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https://greensboro.com/community/rockingham_now/williamsburg-elementary-students-raised-trout-and-released-them/article_e1acb58a-d7e8-11ec-9668-bfc9f566b8b7.html
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Searching for Trout

>>>Anthropologists and biologists are combing the rivers on four continents in their search for a fish which has its origins in British imperialism.

Trout are not easy to catch. Maybe that is why this colourful creature had spread to all corners of the world by the end of the 19th century. Officers and settlers in British colonies were willing to move heaven and earth in order to cultivate their favourite hobby, fly fishing.

Today, brown trout and rainbow trout are found in more than a hundred different countries and on every single continent except Antarctica. These species are featured on the list of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) of the 100 worst invasive alien species in the world and they are known to have a major adverse impact on local fauna.

In many countries it has become official policy to eradicate brown trout and rainbow trout. As in South Africa.

"The South African environmental authorities and white, conservative environmentalists want trout to be removed from the country's rivers and lakes, because they are an alien species," says Knut Nustad.


>>>Flikke says that much of the revenue from the fly fishing industry goes to companies with foreign ownership stakes.

"I stayed with one of the landowners. He is now financially secure. But when I asked him how developments have affected his relationship with the place where he was born and raised, he did not reply. And then he told me that he felt like a stranger," Flikke says.

"He said that when the European and North American anglers arrived he felt like he was being put on display: 'There's the trout and there's a gaucho.' He has become a tourist attraction in his own home."


https://www.miragenews.com/searching-for-trout-791282/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger


Few options to help struggling brown trout populations in SW Montana


>>>Options are limited to prevent brown trout population declines in nine rivers spread across southwestern Montana, a Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife & Parks' official told an interim legislative committee on Tuesday.

"We have few tools to respond quickly to low flow conditions," said Eileen Ryce, Fisheries Bureau chief for the agency. "However, we can adjust fishing regulations to reduce stress during critical time periods."

So far, however, FWP has implemented regulations on only two of the hardest hit rivers: the Big Hole and Beaverhead. There, restrictions on fishing in the fall to protect brown trout spawning beds were implemented last year. On the seven other rivers, similar action doesn't seem warranted, FWP decided.


https://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/few-options-to-help-struggling-brown-trout-populations-in-sw-montana/article_cb198fc2-dc7b-11ec-8162-174ac40eee2a.html
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!
me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.
My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

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