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unlimited it's the water, stupid

Started by Woolly Bugger, March 04, 2019, 11:37:47 AM

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Onslow

Quote from: Dougfish on December 15, 2020, 11:43:52 AMI have not had that issue. Must be shitty interwebs in the country.  :P

Are you using MS Edge, or chrome?

I'm blaming google.

I can open a private browsing window, and not experience delays.  Only experience issues when logged on. I've been shut out of threads for up to six hours. 

Dougfish

"Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change? " -Oddball, 1970

"I don't wanna go to hell,
But if I do,
It'll be 'cause of you..."
Strange Desire, The Black Keys, 2006

troutrus

Internet service is priced so high in the US you would think they have ties to the healthcare industry.

Woolly Bugger

Drought-Stricken Colorado River Basin Could See Additional 20% Drop in Water Flow by 2050

>>>"I always say climate change is water change," says Udall, whose father was Arizona congressman Morris (Mo) Udall, an iconic environmental activist. "It means too much water, not enough water, water at the wrong time. It means reduced water quality. You get all of these things together as the earth warms up."

In Colorado it's all pretty much coming true. The drought is the second worst 20-year period in the past 1,200 years, according to Udall. This summer/fall alone had some of the hottest spells on record and the worst wildfire season ever. On the other hand, 2013 brought catastrophic floods to the Front Range. "I got 17 inches of water in my house here in four days. It's all part of the same change," Udall says.


>>>"I think some of the predictions about reduced flows in the Colorado River based on global warming are so dire it's difficult to wrap your brain around them. We have no operating rules for that kind of reduction in supply," says Anne Castle, a senior fellow at the Getches-Wilkinson Center for Natural Resources at the University of Colorado. "Even with these discussions that will be taking place over the next five years for the Colorado River system, I'm not sure that they will be able to get to an agreement about what would happen if flow is reduced by 50%."

The critical climate change impacts seem to act in a loop: heat causes more evaporation of surface water. The resulting lower water level means water will warm more easily, and in turn evaporates more readily.

Global warming is also changing the dynamics of snowpacks. They melt faster and earlier and don't regularly continue to slowly dissipate, creating a gradual runoff that is more beneficial and sustaining to the water supply. Udall notes that on April 1, 2020, there was 100% of normal snowpack above Lake Powell, which with Lake Mead are the two enormous reservoirs in the system. In a normal year that would provide 90-110% of runoff. But it provided only 52% in 2020 as a result of dry warm weather through fall.

https://www.ecowatch.com/colorado-river-basin-water-drought-2649916894.html?rebelltitem=1#rebelltitem1
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Record low Lake Powell and forecast for coming year sets stage for water cuts, drought planning
The Bureau of Reclamation's dire projections for Colorado River Basin reservoirs for the first time triggers drought contingency planning across seven basin states.

>>>The dry 2020 and the lack of snow this season has water managers in seven states preparing for the first time for cutbacks outlined in drought contingency plans drafted two years ago.

A sobering forecast released this week by the Bureau of Reclamation shows the federally owned Lake Mead and Lake Powell — the nation's two largest reservoirs and critical storage for Colorado River water and its 40 million users — dipping near-record-low levels. If those levels continue dropping as expected, long-negotiated agreements reached by the seven Colorado River Basin states in 2019 will go into effect, with water deliveries curtailed to prevent the federal government from stepping in and making hard water cuts.

The Bureau of Reclamation's quarterly report was dire, showing Lake Powell at 42% of capacity and downriver's Lake Mead at 40% capacity. And there's not much water coming.

"Right now inflows across the basin are well below average. In fact we are setting records for what is in the stream today," said Dave Kanzer, deputy chief engineer with the Colorado River Water Conservation District, presenting the bureau's latest forecasts to the district's board last week.

>>>If the reservoir falls below that 3,525-foot elevation level, the Glen Canyon Dam will be unable to  deliver hydro-electricity to more than 3 million customers and the federal government could lose as much as $150 million a year in revenue from selling that electricity.  Any projection that the reservoir is headed toward that critical threshold gets water managers in all seven basin states ready for drought-response operations that spread the pain of water cuts across every region of the Colorado River Basin.

https://coloradosun.com/2021/01/25/reclamation-lake-powell-forecast-water-cuts-drought-planning/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Dougfish

Way too many manmade pressures on that river. Hard to say which state is the greediest.
Plan on crossing over it in Kremmling, CO in June. Will not attempt to fish it. The amount of water they send east to Denver is obscene.
"Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change? " -Oddball, 1970

"I don't wanna go to hell,
But if I do,
It'll be 'cause of you..."
Strange Desire, The Black Keys, 2006

Onslow

Yes, and Vegas needs to wither on the vine, literally.

More folks need to eat seasonal/local produce.  I reckon most people don't know where their food comes from :embarassed:

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

A $5-billion water project could drill through Anza-Borrego park. Is it a pipe dream?

>>>It would be arguably the most ambitious public works project in San Diego history.

The envisioned pipeline would carry Colorado River water more than 130 miles from the Imperial Valley — through the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, tunneling under the Cuyamaca Mountains, and passing through the Cleveland National Forest — to eventually connect with a water-treatment plant in San Marcos.

An alternative route would run through the desert to the south, boring under Mt. Laguna before emptying into the San Vicente Reservoir in Lakeside.

Estimated cost: roughly $5 billion. New water delivered: None.



https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-02-05/water-pipeline-anza-borrego-desert-state-park
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Utah to stake claims to Colorado River water

>>>Water is becoming a bigger issues as Utah continues to grow. Now, the Utah State Legislature is wading into the issue with a new bill that asserts the state's claims on the Colorado River.

"Water can be a pretty contentious issue and we just want to make sure we're really well prepared," House Speaker Brad Wilson, R-Kaysville, said in an interview with FOX 13.

House Bill 297 creates an authority to represent Utah's interests when it comes to the river, which supplies water to Utah and six surrounding states.

"It's designed protect our share of the water we negotiated 100 years ago," said Speaker Wilson.

Utah is only using 54% of the Colorado River water it is able to, he said. That is expected to change as the state continues to grow.

"As we grow, we would probably like to use more of that. But the other thing that's happening, which is here in the state we're doing much better on conservation. So the amount we're using isn't growing as the same rate of our population. That's a good thing. But we do need to protect the water rights we have," he told FOX 13.


>>>Zach Frankel with the Utah Rivers Council blasted the bill and said it was more about advancing the Lake Powell Pipeline project.

"This bill is not about water. This bill is about money. This bill is about special-interest politicking. It's about climate change denial. It's about limiting public government," he told the House Natural Resources committee.

https://www.fox13now.com/news/local-news/utah-to-stake-claims-to-colorado-river-water
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Dougfish

"Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change? " -Oddball, 1970

"I don't wanna go to hell,
But if I do,
It'll be 'cause of you..."
Strange Desire, The Black Keys, 2006

Woolly Bugger

Colorado River outlook darkens dramatically in new study


>>>In the gloomiest long-term forecast yet for the drought-stricken Colorado River, a new study warns that lower river basin states including Arizona may have to slash their take from the river up to 40% by the 2050s to keep reservoirs from falling too low.

Such a cut would amount to about twice as much as the three Lower Basin states — Arizona, California and Nevada — agreed to absorb under the drought contingency plan they approved in early 2019.

Overall, the study warned that managing the river sustainably will require substantially larger cuts in use by Lower Basin states than currently envisioned, along with curbs on future diversions by Upper Basin states.

While climate change's impacts on the river have been repeatedly studied, this is the first study that seeks to pinpoint how warming temperatures would translate into reductions in water that river basin states could take over the long term.

Carrying out the study's recommendations, under the most likely conditions of climate change, almost certainly would mean more  supply curbs for the $4 billion Central Arizona Project.

The CAP is already slated to lose nearly half its total allocation under the worst case, shorter-term scenarios envisioned under the 2019 drought plan.

Tucson and Phoenix-area cities and tribes, along with Central Arizona farmers, all depend on the CAP for water for drinking or irrigation.


https://tucson.com/news/local/colorado-river-outlook-darkens-dramatically-in-new-study/article_15e0185d-60d7-597d-ba7f-366b8e69920e.html
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

February 07, 2021, 10:28:53 AM #88 Last Edit: February 07, 2021, 10:33:08 AM by Woolly Bugger
New report confronts tough choices for the future of the Colorado River
It's time for hard conversations about what kind of future we want for the Colorado River and all who depend upon it.

>>>The Center for Colorado River Studies at Utah State University recently published a preprint edition of their new white paper titled, "Alternative Management Paradigms for the Future of the Colorado and Green Rivers." The authors of the paper include Kevin Wheeler, Jack Schmidt, Brad Udall, and former Colorado River District General Manager, Eric Kuhn, among a few notable others in the climate modeling and Colorado River management space (Disclosure: Jack Schmidt and Eric Kuhn both serve voluntarily on American Rivers' Science and Technical Advisory Committee.) The new publication builds upon a 2020 white paper, "Strategies for Managing the Colorado River in an Uncertain Future." Wheeler et. al ran scenarios for various planning strategies on one of the most managed rivers in the world, the Colorado, to better understand the implications of those decisions in a hotter and drier future. Using the same computer modeling tools used by basin managers (the Bureau of Reclamation CRSS model), they integrated new climate and river flow data and looked out decades into the future to explore and predict water supply conditions under various scenarios.


>>>The outcome of the study, in short: we've got to be more creative, and we need to have some hard conversations about what kind of future we want for the Colorado River and all who depend upon it.  American Rivers has been engaged with the authors of the study, and we're coming up to speed with its prescient findings. But even more important than that, our desire is to spark a conversation with you about what kind of future lies before us, what this new science tell us about various realities on the river, and how can we design solutions for the river, together.

John Fleck, author of a pair of recent books on western water, recently posted his take on the study, including some of the key highlights. He underscored that "Under a relatively optimistic scenario (things don't get any drier than they've been in the first two decades of the 21st century), stabilizing the system would require:

The Upper Basin to not increase its uses beyond its current ~4-million-acre feet per year of water use.
The Lower Basin to adjust to routinely only getting ~6-million-acre feet of water."

Basically, that means adapting to living in a 10-12 million-acre-foot (MAF) river, rather than a 17 MAF river as the Colorado River Compact assumes. Obviously, this stuck out to us too. While the Law of the River (the Colorado River Compact) essentially promised 7.5 MAF for the Upper Basin and 8.5 MAF for the Lower Basin (then added in Mexico's allocation later), the Alternative Management Paradigms study makes clear that this is now an unattainable, and unwise, ambition.

https://www.americanrivers.org/2021/02/new-report-confronts-tough-choices-for-the-future-of-the-colorado-river/?fbclid=IwAR2257RuyeTL1sLH21ARg7GQVXN8PEpzqbaqaqz03DYQ8vQCgLM3dMYGKXg

Unrealistic future depletion projections for the Upper Basin confound planning. There simply isn't enough water to meet the aspirations for growth of the Upper Basin. "Unreasonable and unjustified estimations create the impression that compact delivery violations...are inevitable. Such distortions mislead the public about the magnitude of the impending water supply crisis and make identifying solutions to an already difficult problem even harder."
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Woolly Bugger

Utah is a leader in cloud seeding. Is it working?
As drought deepens in the Colorado River Basin, the state's program could serve as a model for boosting West's water supplies.

>>>Utah's winter sports industry may claim the greatest snow on Earth, but for skiers and water watchers alike, there is hardly ever enough powder.

For nearly 50 years, the second-driest state in the nation has been giving natural winter storms an engineered boost to help deepen its snowpack through a program largely funded by state taxpayers, local governments and water conservancy districts. More recently, the states that rely on water from the lower Colorado River — California, Arizona and Nevada — have been paying for additional cloud seeding in Utah.

Thanks to the steady funding stream, Utah's program has developed into one of the most comprehensive weather modification efforts in the West, and, after decades of expansion, every major mountain range in the state now sees extensive cloud seeding.

But that doesn't mean aircraft are buzzing overhead, creating precipitation. Seeding — which in Utah is done mostly by stationary, propane-powered generators on the ground — is possible only under a narrow range of conditions, usually when snow is already in the forecast, explained Jake Serago, an engineer with the Utah Division of Water Resources.

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2021/03/28/utah-is-leader-cloud/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!


#CommissionsEarned