• Welcome to Pretentious Snobby Bastard Fly Fishing!. Please login or sign up.
July 15, 2019, 14:48:33 pm

News:

NC Delayed Harvest Trout Waters Open to Harvest June 1, 2019


+-+-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats

Members
Total Members: 2308
Latest: pizzamaker
New This Month: 3
New This Week: 1
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 145422
Total Topics: 14054
Most Online Today: 669
Most Online Ever: 832
(March 08, 2019, 15:41:24 pm)
Users Online
Members: 37
Guests: 611
Total: 648

Spinning rods are the future fam

Started by wildmttwalleye, July 15, 2017, 00:14:49 am

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Yallerhammer

Quote from: Phil on July 27, 2017, 19:41:47 pm
That sounds like a lot of work, Hammer. I've never eaten gar or turtle. Boy, I used to eat lots of rattlesnake, alligator, squirrel, bass, and crappie (we called 'em speckled perch, though-- never heard 'em called crappie till I was grown). Only tried possum once. It sucked big time.

Not as much work as it sounds like.  A couple minutes per fish. And yeah, possum is nasty.
Women want me, doughbellies fear me.<br /><br />Little Debbie Prostaff

Yallerhammer

Quote from: DAYUMson on July 27, 2017, 19:54:43 pm


Quote from: itieuglyflies on July 27, 2017, 17:36:08 pm
To join the wide ranging discussion. First, walleye.....just got back Sat. from annual(20th)  trip to Quebec where our group of ten catches a little over one thousand each year on the six day trip. I eat a lot of fish and I must say a fresh caught walleye sautéed in butter with salt and pepper with a little lemon juice is about as good as it gets when it comes to eating fish. Since we are so far back in the sticks we have walleye with everything.....walleye with blueberries, fried eggs, spaghetti yep tried it!
Yes you can catch them on a fly and I have done it, but a good ole spinning rod with a jig is far superior.



I have always dreamed of two major sportsman trips:

1. Upland pheasant/chukkar hunt over a solid German Shorthair in the Dakotas

2. Fly in Canadian Shield Lake trip for walleye, smallies, pike, and musky.


Tell me more about your walleye trip.


Sounds good to me. I would add a caribou or moose hunt with primitive archery equipment. And catching some of those 2' long brook trout up in Canada on flies that look like a big wharf rat. Or colored-up Arctic char.
 
Women want me, doughbellies fear me.<br /><br />Little Debbie Prostaff

The Dude

July 28, 2017, 07:31:52 am #77 Last Edit: July 28, 2017, 11:12:42 am by The Dude
Quote from: Yallerhammer on July 27, 2017, 15:05:22 pm

I do not consume carp. I am not one to believe what everybody says, so I tried one once to see for myself. It was nasty. Very, very strong and fishy. The whole fish was like that nasty red streak that you cut out of stripers, big catfish, or white bass fillets.

I have no guilt in shooting them, as they are a non-native, invasive scourge. But I don't waste them. I either give them to a black guy or a Ukranian guy I know, both of whom love carp; or use them for fertilizer.


Being of Slovak (Rusyn) & Ukrainian (Lemko) descent, I have eaten and enjoy a lot of the ethnic dishes at family gatherings - pirohi, halupki, bobalki, halushki, kolachi, hrutka, etc. Christmas Eve supper is a particularly traditional meal (meatless as is the Byzantine Catholic policy).  The main dish is typically smoked carp, but that was one part of the old world palate that we never incorporated (maybe because it was too hard to come by on Christmas Eve) - instead we always just had shrimp. To this day I've never eaten carp.
I did eat possum once. I was a fresh 2LT in the Army and one of my soldiers died in a horrific car accident while home on leave in Magnolia, Arkansas. I attended his funeral, and funerals in the rural south black community are like a party with lots of potluck food. Someone brought a possum dish and the family dared me to eat it. It wasn't particularly good, but I didn't think it was as nasty as people usually say. It was bland in taste and the texture was a little mushy, but mostly I just remember it being really greasy, almost like a petrol based grease like Vaseline or something like that. I still finished my plate so it couldn't have been that bad, although I passed when offered seconds.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I was born by the river in a little tent,
And just like the river I've been running ever since,
It's been a long, long time coming,
But I know change is gonna come.

troutfanatic

Turtle soup is a big thing in southwest Pennsylvania. Although it seems to be declining (generation thing?) I used to eat it frequently. There is a bar near my MiL's house that is well known for it. Closest thing I can describe it as, is similar to Manhattan style clam chowder. So a tomato broth with potatoes, veggies and, uh, turtle.

Agree with Ken about keeping a carp for a bit before eating. One of my Dad's friends used to ask me to put a couple on a stringer. He'd come get them in a cooler with an aerator. He had a small pond behind his house where he kept them. He'd brine them and smoke them. I ate it a few times, and it wasn't bad.

If we wanna discuss odd table fare, I once ate rover while in Korea. I didn't know until afterwards but it wasn't horrible. I also had horse and camel on various Mideast visits.

itieuglyflies

Beaver has always been a favorite of mine.....

The Dude

Quote from: itieuglyflies on July 28, 2017, 12:21:48 pm
Beaver has always been a favorite of mine.....


You like it served with a side of spicy red clam sauce?
I was born by the river in a little tent,
And just like the river I've been running ever since,
It's been a long, long time coming,
But I know change is gonna come.

troutfanatic


Aka

I had hawksbill turtle soup in Nicaragua. It was prepared simply with local tubers and chayote. The meat had a pleasant flavor but was very greasy.
The tiny "restaurant" that had it on that days menu had two other turtles behind the shop that were awaiting a similar fate as the one in my soup bowl. A couple of eco-warriors slipped behind the restaurant later that night under a cloak of darkness to liberate them and then returned them to the sea from whence they came.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Onslow

Quote from: DAYUMson on July 16, 2017, 13:36:51 pm
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 16, 2017, 11:18:43 am
Quote from: DAYUMson on July 15, 2017, 23:00:52 pm
Quote from: Onslow on July 15, 2017, 12:18:30 pm


Fuk a walleye tho. 

Damn low performing yankee pop eyed prairie perch.  Whatever you do, don't start talking like yer from Iowa, or some shit.

New River natives bro

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk


You might be mistaken on the "native" New Walleye.  Native to the Clinch, Big Sandy, etc. drainage perhaps, but I don't think the Walleye is native to the New River.  Ken also may be smoking his socks when he lumps them as "yankee pop eyed prairie perch".

Best fish I ever tasted were MN Walleye, all you could eat at a mom-and-pop joint in northern MN.

Rock on!



https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251574039_Movements_of_Walleyes_in_Claytor_Lake_and_the_Upper_New_River_Virginia_Indicate_Distinct_Lake_and_River_Populations


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://theses.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-121499-151909/unrestricted/etd.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwjiqp3sqo7VAhVDOj4KHaHiDFMQFggdMAA&usg=AFQjCNHj1pHwBHkUy1Qj5-ZymxNkEI-yOA

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Brian_Murphy10/publication/251573420_Genetic_marker-assisted_restoration_of_the_presumptive_native_walleye_fishery_in_the_New_River_Virginia_and_West_Virginia/links/0046351f137feb9e8d000000/Genetic-marker-assisted-restoration-of-the-presumptive-native-walleye-fishery-in-the-New-River-Virginia-and-West-Virginia.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwjiqp3sqo7VAhVDOj4KHaHiDFMQFggiMAE&usg=AFQjCNEA8eI1UvX0_uGMHpLJlM2J5Ob5pA

George Palmer did his graduate work on the New River walleye and found there exists two genetically distinct stocks: one lotic and one lentic. The lotic stock (or strain) spawns in the river is always bigger.

The genetics of the river strain is more similar to a strain of walleye found in the Rockcastle River in KY than any lake strain known. It is unique in that it has never been found anywhere else except the New. They are restocking New River strain walleyes by testing large female and males via fin clips and protein analysis prior to spawning them at the Buller fish hatchery.

Also, the old timers will tell you about them. They called them "pike".

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk


Thread of the year.

So the USGS data suggests that Muskies, Redbreasts, Rock Bass, Walleyes, Smallmouth Bass are all upper New interlopers.  Flathead cats, and brook trout are native brethren.  Lets discuss. 

While this is possible due to features such as Brooks Falls, and Sandstone, I simply cannot wrap my head around what is currently regarded as facts.

Stone-Man

I've eaten a few muskrats -- Delicious  !!

Back to Cave

wildmttwalleye

Quote from: Onslow on August 26, 2017, 09:04:16 am
Quote from: DAYUMson on July 16, 2017, 13:36:51 pm
Quote from: Mudwall Gatewood 3.0 on July 16, 2017, 11:18:43 am
Quote from: DAYUMson on July 15, 2017, 23:00:52 pm
Quote from: Onslow on July 15, 2017, 12:18:30 pm


Fuk a walleye tho. 

Damn low performing yankee pop eyed prairie perch.  Whatever you do, don't start talking like yer from Iowa, or some shit.

New River natives bro

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk


You might be mistaken on the "native" New Walleye.  Native to the Clinch, Big Sandy, etc. drainage perhaps, but I don't think the Walleye is native to the New River.  Ken also may be smoking his socks when he lumps them as "yankee pop eyed prairie perch".

Best fish I ever tasted were MN Walleye, all you could eat at a mom-and-pop joint in northern MN.

Rock on!



https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251574039_Movements_of_Walleyes_in_Claytor_Lake_and_the_Upper_New_River_Virginia_Indicate_Distinct_Lake_and_River_Populations


https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://theses.lib.vt.edu/theses/available/etd-121499-151909/unrestricted/etd.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwjiqp3sqo7VAhVDOj4KHaHiDFMQFggdMAA&usg=AFQjCNHj1pHwBHkUy1Qj5-ZymxNkEI-yOA

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Brian_Murphy10/publication/251573420_Genetic_marker-assisted_restoration_of_the_presumptive_native_walleye_fishery_in_the_New_River_Virginia_and_West_Virginia/links/0046351f137feb9e8d000000/Genetic-marker-assisted-restoration-of-the-presumptive-native-walleye-fishery-in-the-New-River-Virginia-and-West-Virginia.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwjiqp3sqo7VAhVDOj4KHaHiDFMQFggiMAE&usg=AFQjCNEA8eI1UvX0_uGMHpLJlM2J5Ob5pA

George Palmer did his graduate work on the New River walleye and found there exists two genetically distinct stocks: one lotic and one lentic. The lotic stock (or strain) spawns in the river is always bigger.

The genetics of the river strain is more similar to a strain of walleye found in the Rockcastle River in KY than any lake strain known. It is unique in that it has never been found anywhere else except the New. They are restocking New River strain walleyes by testing large female and males via fin clips and protein analysis prior to spawning them at the Buller fish hatchery.

Also, the old timers will tell you about them. They called them "pike".

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk


Thread of the year.

So the USGS data suggests that Muskies, Redbreasts, Rock Bass, Walleyes, Smallmouth Bass are all upper New interlopers.  Flathead cats, and brook trout are native brethren.  Lets discuss. 

While this is possible due to features such as Brooks Falls, and Sandstone, I simply cannot wrap my head around what is currently regarded as facts.
All I can really discuss is brookies and walleye. I could be wrong, happens more often than not, but both of them are viewed as Native by to the New Basin by VDGIF.

I'm fairly well versed in the papers which establish this notion for both species. I can post em up if you want to read them.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk


Onslow

I'm interested in methods used to arrive at conclusions. 

troutfanatic

QuoteI can post em up if you want to read them.


Please do.

Unrelated, but if you have anything that provides an idea of temperature tolerances for crayfish and common aquatic insects, I'll buy you a beer or six.

RiverbumCO

My extended family had a barrel of turtle but somehow we couldn't get enough to justify a satisfactory cooking. I am sorry To my friend Spork, who acquired one turtle, but the cookout never happened
My real name is Chad Farthouse.

+-Recent Topics

shoulda used a rainbow midge.... by Woolly Bugger
Today at 13:45:21

Short Excursion by Woolly Bugger
Today at 12:05:27

PRICE DROP: Simms Headwaters Chest pack and Backpacks by pizzamaker
July 14, 2019, 15:36:08 pm

Native Tree/Plant Plight by Woolly Bugger
July 13, 2019, 18:40:12 pm

Carp unlimited by Dougfish
July 12, 2019, 20:48:43 pm

Nawleans by Pansyman
July 12, 2019, 16:17:08 pm

Mossy Creek Article by Phil
July 12, 2019, 09:22:05 am

Unlimited Fly Fishing News and Articles... by Woolly Bugger
July 11, 2019, 12:08:08 pm

Video of the day... by Woolly Bugger
July 11, 2019, 11:21:12 am

TG-6 on the stream... by Woolly Bugger
July 11, 2019, 10:44:43 am

Powered by EzPortal