• Welcome to Pretentious Snobby Bastard Fly Fishing!. Please login or sign up.
+-+-

+-User

Welcome, Guest.
Please login or register.
 
 
 
Forgot your password?

+-Stats

Members
Total Members: 2305
Latest: gpierce18
New This Month: 0
New This Week: 0
New Today: 0
Stats
Total Posts: 145053
Total Topics: 14013
Most Online Today: 679
Most Online Ever: 832
(March 08, 2019, 15:41:24 pm)
Users Online
Members: 35
Guests: 639
Total: 674

Unlimited confederate (or any other) war memorial

Started by Woolly Bugger, July 07, 2015, 12:05:51 pm

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 3 Guests are viewing this topic.

Woolly Bugger

A walk through an Appalachian graveyard

QuoteWest Virginia will forever be connected to the Civil War. It was created when it became the first and only state to secede from the Confederacy on June 20, 1863, after years of neglect by the plantation-owning aristocracy in greater Virginia that was determined to continue slavery instead of paying their southern brethren a living wage. That is how some would view the conflict anyway, as others fought for the South and what they viewed as their besieged homeland.

West Virginia was also the perfect example of brother fighting brother and cousin fighting cousin during the War Between the States. The truth is that Union sympathizers and soldiers could be found in every Confederate state except for South Carolina. The Free State of Jones existed in Mississippi, the thousands-strong Hill Country Militia was located in Texas, the Mountain Feds were based in Arkansas, the Jayhawker fighters fought in Louisiana, the Winston County soldiers came out of Alabama, the Independent Rangers held court in Florida, the Pickens County brethren were from Georgia, and thousands of Eastern Tennessee fighters fought with the Union forces.

Western North Carolina was no different, and that history includes the true story of Sarah Malinda "Sam" Blalock. "Sam" Blalock was one of only two female soldiers who disguised themselves as men and fought during the Civil War. Her story is well-documented throughout history.

https://www.herald-dispatch.com/features_entertainment/a-walk-through-an-appalachian-graveyard/article_ce1cb7f3-e7c6-5601-8b15-9f3ebf6acac8.html

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

Group calls for 'Dixie' to be taken out of Dixie Classic Fair over associations with slavery
http://via.wghp.com/DXMfr
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Al

Quote from: Woolly Bugger on April 10, 2019, 15:43:39 pmGroup calls for 'Dixie' to be taken out of Dixie Classic Fair over associations with slavery
http://via.wghp.com/DXMfr


I saw the same thing in our local newspaper. My immediate thought was "Well I guess the Dixie Deer Classic will be next"

Woolly Bugger

PC craziness if you ask me!


QuoteNike's latest ad campaign was online for just a few hours before historians on Twitter noticed a problem: The slogan, "The Lost Cause," was intended to promote the brand's new Trail Running collection, but it also called up a phrase with disturbing significance dating back to the years following the Civil War.

https://footwearnews.com/2019/business/retail/nike-lost-cause-ad-campaign-confederate-history-1202770716/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

PHOTOS: Wilmington's hidden Civil War history

In a 1917 StarNews article, a Confederate veteran described the defensive earthworks that surrounded Willmington during the Civil War. Many of these remnants still exist, though often now part of the area's hidden history.

Photos show Dr. Chris Fonvielle, an expert on Wilmington's Civil War history, on part of the earthworks of the Sugar Loaf defenses in a remote area of Carolina Beach State Park.


https://www.starnewsonline.com/photogallery/NC/20190418/OPINION/418009982/PH/1


ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

April 24, 2019, 17:25:04 pm #337 Last Edit: April 24, 2019, 18:03:19 pm by Woolly Bugger
Lacking anything better to do, the Winston Salem City Council voted to rename the 131 year old Dixie Classic Fair!

the snowflake gubment capitulated to the whiny agitator's demands without any public imput.


https://www.wfmynews2.com/article/news/local/no-more-dixie-classic-fair-winston-salem-starts-process-to-change-name-of-the-citys-annual-fair-second-largest-in-nc/83-3415f41a-9606-4ed2-ad4b-f82447f7f237 

you can enter you own new fair name https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DCFNameInput?fbclid=IwAR0f22LWNFsCp2-bjelvofX_cnOz7unTLJXLvElDbSWt__hm4qcoQ6rdTm4

Twitter Storm https://twitter.com/cityofws/status/1121076727931863040?s=21
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

QuoteArlington County is one step closer to renaming Jefferson Davis Highway.

The Arlington County Board voted 5-0 late Thursday night to formally request the name change to Richmond Highway.
Virginia's Commonwealth Transportation Board will make the final decision in the coming months. If approved, the name would be changed no later than October.


https://wamu.org/story/19/04/26/arlington-county-votes-to-remove-confederate-presidents-name-from-highway/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?


Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

April 30, 2019, 07:11:34 am #342 Last Edit: April 30, 2019, 11:24:05 am by Woolly Bugger
 Virginia judge rules Charlottesville confederate statues are war monuments protected by state law
http://via.wghp.com/uhJyP


QuoteIn his nine page ruling, Moore cites the fact that both Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson are depicted in their military uniforms and on horses associated with their time in the Civil War.
"I believe that defendants have confused or conflated 1) what the statues are with 2) the intentions or motivations of some involved in erecting them, or the impact that they might have on some people and how they might make some people feel," Moore writes. "But that does not change what they are."

http://www.nbc12.com/2019/04/29/judges-rules-confederate-statues-are-war-monuments/
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?

Woolly Bugger


A New Civil War Museum Speaks Truths in the Former Capital of the Confederacy


QuoteAt the terminus of five railroads, Richmond, Virginia was more than just the nominal capital of the Confederate States of America. The city's factories supplied the Confederacy with food, munitions, and cannons. After the war, its historians, writers, and sculptors manufactured "heroes" of the Confederacy as men who treated enslaved people with paternalistic affection, fighting for just causes and states' rights.

Richmond, once the second-largest market for enslaved people and the capital of a state where more than half of all Civil War battles were fought, would, in peacetime, metamorphose into the site of a prolonged, contested engagement for the very memory of the war. The myths garlanding Confederate figures like Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee, who made Richmond their home for relatively brief spells of time, have long outshone the stories of generations of Richmonders who have lived in the contradictions of the city of the Lost Cause.

It's with some fitting justice, then, that a museum opening this weekend in what was once the industrial heart of Richmond sits at the center of the nation's modern-day struggles to understand the impact and devastation wrought by the Civil War.

Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/civil-war-museum-speaks-truths-former-capital-of-confederacy-180972085/#jW3sHpqBwcq7gZQo.99


ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!”

me -There's a season?


+-Recent Topics

Powered by EzPortal