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Warm Blooded Fish

Started by ptfranze, May 15, 2015, 11:20:26 AM

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ptfranze

Well it is nearing the end of the school year and now teacher's attitude and work ethic are starting to match the students,  non existent.  So as a result I spend a lot of time reading random articles.  Stumbled across this and found it pretty interesting so I thought I would share.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/05/14/warm-blooded-fish-discovered/27318727/


Big J

If nothing like that trait has been seen before in a fish, what do you think it evolved from?

Is that the fish humans evolved from?

8)


Transylwader

Pat, you are bored as fuck. Im gonna come scoop you up to piss some carps off. Tell Marissa she can watch. /'/


ptfranze

Quote from: Transylwader on May 15, 2015, 12:51:18 PM

Pat, you are bored as fuck. Im gonna come scoop you up to piss some carps off. Tell Marissa she can watch. /'/

This is no lie Mike.  Work is slow as hell today.  Going out down town for a friends birthday right after though, so its going to get better.  Just 2 more hours until the beer starts flowing  0:0


Michael Toris

May 16, 2015, 03:50:01 AM #4 Last Edit: May 16, 2015, 03:52:35 AM by wildmttrout
Quote from: Big J on May 15, 2015, 12:14:07 PM

If nothing like that trait has been seen before in a fish, what do you think it evolved from?

Is that the fish humans evolved from?

8)

The article is very misleading. Fatty pelagic fishes (tuna) have a very similar ability. They employ capillaries around muscle tissue to absorb heat from friction produced my mussel movement into the bloodstream, thus warming the blood.

The fish all terrestrial vertebrates evolved from is the ancestor to Tiktaalik roseae[\i] who is thought to be the first tetrapod. This creature had a bone structure common to all land vertebrates (tetrapods), one bone (humorous), two bones (radis and ulna), and a wrist. This structure would allow a creature to maintain its body weight on its limbs. It also had a lung, evolved from a physoclistous swim bladder (seen in tarpon and gar), which allowed it to breathe atmospheric oxygen. See Neil Shubin's work.

Come at me bro

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Big J

On what little time I had on the toliet, using my phone i read this article.

http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-new-fossils-tiktaalik-roseae-01686.html

I must make two points.

1) that sure is a lot of "answers" to a big question using so little info on an amphibian/fish thing.

2) I do see a lot of resemblance to some of our bored members. 


Michael Toris

Quote from: Big J on May 16, 2015, 08:23:24 AM

On what little time I had on the toliet, using my phone i read this article.

http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-new-fossils-tiktaalik-roseae-01686.html

I must make two points.

1) that sure is a lot of "answers" to a big question using so little info on an amphibian/fish thing.

2) I do see a lot of resemblance to some of our bored members.

My response:

1. That is what you get for using non-primary sources. Find his original paper, published in "Nature", for more info. Or read/watch "Your Inner Fish" by Dr. Shubin.  Additionally, this creature really does answer so many questions; it is beyond belief how it was found and what it has meant to science. One of the greatest achievements in our lifetime for sure.

2. Most of these guys, myself included, are now where near that evolved. Giving us way too much credit.



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