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If they call it a brook trout...

Started by shanktrout, March 30, 2006, 18:52:43 PM

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shanktrout

Up here in Yankeville we call the little streams brooks. Down in Cacalaki (sp) etc... they're commonly reffered to as creeks... So I'm curious to know if anyone ever calls them creek trout.... or creekies..... I guess it would be pronounced "crick-ees" or something? Afterall, the Southern Appalachins do hold some of the oldest brook trout strains don't they?


Shane


teachrtec

specks here in this part of WNC

Brad  8)

Brad  8)

Grumpy


9ft4wt2


FT

Quote

"Brookies" is a derogatory yankee term

Guess I need to remove that word for my vocabulary.   ;D

Regardless of what you call them, I'm going to see if I can't catch a few of them tomorrow.

Charter Member Shenandoah Valley Irregulars

shanktrout

Quote

"Brookies" is a derogatory yankee term that has crept into our language due largely to the influence of the mass media and the inherent need of flatlanders to just get along. The latter being the main reason we lost the war.

absales...that's what surprised me the most...? Does anyone remember the whole back the brookie thing before chick went off the deep end and moved to California to do freebase? Why wasn't it back the crickies?


troutphisher

March 31, 2006, 20:20:54 PM #7 Last Edit: March 31, 2006, 20:27:48 PM by troutphisher

Not in my part of VA; THEY ARE SPECKLED TROUT. The educated young folks (past 6th grade and under 50) sometimes refer to them as brook trout, but never "brookies". "Brookies" is a derogatory yankee term that has crept into our language due largely to the influence of the mass media and the inherent need of flatlanders to just get along. The latter being the main reason we lost the war.

fatal
[/quote]

Rhetorical nonsense, bordering on slander. Yankees (educated) refer to them as  Salvelinus fontinalis.

The war, perhaps was lost due to lack of industry in the south and no allies in Europe willing to help.
The whole of the souths GNP (gross national product) during 1861 through 1865 was only about 1/4 that of New York, It could not afford to sustain fighting from both a monetary and manpower depletion.

I doubt the south would have entered into such an endeavor, if it had been know prior to secession, that no help would come from England or France.

The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.

Al

Old Yankee stirring the pot.

Shank - how do you explain "Splakes", which were a cross between Speckled Trout or Brookies, depending on you point of view and Lake Trout. Not sure if they still cross them, but at one time NH used to stock several of their "reclaimed ponds" which are bigger then most "lakes" here in the south, with "Splakes". They grew a little bigger and faster then Brook Trout - their distinguishing feature was a very pronounced forked tail.

80 degrees today and I have my garden just about all in - how about up your way Jessie? ;D


shanktrout

Al,

The Splake is alive and well and as far as the name goes.... must be half speck.

Didn't catch any Eastern Brook Trout today but did manage 4 Landlocked Salmon up in Alton Bay...largest being being 23" and fat. Weather is just now starting to turn... long way off still from the 80's. Still some ice on the lake but one of the earliest ice outs ever.


Woolly Bugger

bump from the past... what's in a Common Name?

ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

Mudwall Gatewood 3.0

Quote from: Woolly Bugger on October 03, 2020, 19:58:10 PM

bump from the past... what's in a Common Name?

Confusion and misunderstanding. 

"Enjoy every sandwich."  Warren Zevon

troutrus

Regardless of local name, wherever I've been they've always been highly regarded for their native status, even where that designation was questionable. It is even considered "state fish" for a number of states.

I'll bet the native people would have appreciated similar consideration.


Yallerhammer

Around here, we call the natives specks or mountain trout, and those washed out stocked northern strain ones brook trout. And most little creeks they live in here would be called a branch instead of a brook. :laugh:

Muddy, Salvelinus fontinalis just doesn't roll off the tongue quite like "speck" in normal conversation.

Women want me, doughbellies fear me.<br /><br />Little Debbie Prostaff

Mudwall Gatewood 3.0

Quote from: Yallerhammer on October 04, 2020, 08:52:36 AM

Muddy, Salvelinus fontinalis just doesn't roll off the tongue quite like "speck" in normal conversation.

I did not say to use the scientific name.

Page 87 in the pdf.  Accepted common names of fishes from the American Fisheries Society (Common and Scientific Names of Fishes from the United States, Canada, and Mexico, 7th edition).

https://fisheries.org/docs/pub_fish_names.pdf

https://fisheries.org/bookstore/all-titles/special-publications/51034c/

No mention of "specks", "speckled trout", "mountain trout", "brookies", "natives", or any of the other localized names assigned.

Herein lies the problem with so many 'local' common names; it used to bother me.  Really little or no confusion with brook trout, but you can imagine the potential confusion when the same common name is assigned to a half dozen or more critters, like sulphur or sulfur.  Communication across regions, or even from one watershed to the next, is lost, when it comes to 'hatches', if an angler is interested in such stuff.

Look at the accepted names for insects.  Obviously, there are many more species of insects than fish, but I could not find 'sulphur or sulfur' as an example.  My eyes grew weary, so if someone makes a discovery, let me know.

https://www.entsoc.org/sites/default/files/files/common_name.pdf

As I think I said in the other thread, my youthful passion was to legitimize the common names of important angling hatches, by using the first common name assigned in the surplus of fly angling literature.  It really was an easy research project.  Would these common names have been accepted by professionals like the Entomological Society of America?  I do not know, but it might have been accepted in the angling community.

Peace out.

"Enjoy every sandwich."  Warren Zevon


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