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Simms offering bootfoot G3 waders for 2014.

Started by The Dude, November 25, 2013, 13:49:35 pm

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The Dude

Seems odd to me.



http://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/waders/g3-guide-bootfoot-waders-felt.html

Also, they have upgraded their rubber soles on some of their new 2014 boots to make them lighter and a bit more soft in the sole to increase feel.

http://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/footwear.html

Ultimate Blueliner?


http://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/footwear/vapor-boot.html
I was born by the river in a little tent,
And just like the river I've been running ever since,
It's been a long, long time coming,
But I know change is gonna come.

benben reincarnated

Those bootfoots seem to be good for people that stand in one place all day and don't move, a la The Douche, otherwise they definitely are not something I'd wear on a blueline...or waders for that matter.  Maybe they work well if you are in a crab boat in Alaska all day too.

I'm liking the sole upgrades on the boots though...

The Dude

I just wonder if Simms is going to get more than they bargained for wrt their warranty.  The way I figure, a good pair of waders can last through multiple pairs of boots.  Now, when the boots wear out, are people going to be turning in their waders under warranty?  Or will the warranty for the waders not cover boots getting worn out?  If I still wore waders, I'd still prefer to keep my boots and waders separate.  Bootfoot waders only seem to make sense to me for cheap waders that are not meant to last and that do not have a liberal return policy.  At $699 a pair, color me confused.
I was born by the river in a little tent,
And just like the river I've been running ever since,
It's been a long, long time coming,
But I know change is gonna come.

Transylwader


snagaluffaguss

The boot foots are for winter fishing Dude.  Like real winter. Not what we have here.

Aka

November 25, 2013, 19:54:11 pm #5 Last Edit: November 25, 2013, 20:09:06 pm by AK Aaron
Quote from: benben on November 25, 2013, 14:26:18 pm
Those bootfoots seem to be good for people that stand in one place all day and don't move, a la The Douche, otherwise they definitely are not something I'd wear on a blueline...or waders for that matter.  Maybe they work well if you are in a crab boat in Alaska all day too.



Small chance that crab (or any other fisherman) will be wearing the new simms anytime soon.

For warmth & comfort the market is about 99% locked down by Grundens & Xtratuf.


[attach=1]

[attach=2]

Oh yes, and this.

[attach=3]



benben reincarnated

Yeah Aaron, but the real question is do they help you catch halibut?

The Dude

FIFY

Quote from: benben on November 25, 2013, 20:03:17 pm
Yeah Aaron, but the real question is do they help you catch and kill world record halibut?
I was born by the river in a little tent,
And just like the river I've been running ever since,
It's been a long, long time coming,
But I know change is gonna come.

Al

Bootfoot's suck. If you walk any distance they will soon chafe the hell out of your leg where the boot and wader come together.

Peddler

I have a pair of Simms Guide bootfoots. Whoever said bootfoots are nice in real cold weather is spot on.
I used them for steelheading simply because you can load them up with insulating layers and still wiggle your toes.There are no laces to freeze up either. That's huge when fishing is done and it's time to scoot.
I also used them for quick fishing jaunts between calls. They are easy off and on and slip on over suit pants easily.
Another use is cold water 'tooning. Screw ankle support and looking 'guidish' when you're just wearing them to keep dry and warm and as a place to hang your flippers on.
And then there's ice fishing! You sometimes have to walk a good way on the ice to get to where your going. With heavy snowmpbile suits you stay warm or more typically get hot walking to your spot then you get to sit outside in the cold and wind while drenched in sweat. That was real suckish. Insulating layers to suit the temperature under a  breathable, wind blocking outer shell with Gore Tex made things a Hell of a lot more comfortable. The biggest downside to those waders is how the felt soles picked up snow in layers with each step.
Just saying... I used the heck out of those waders and got well  over my moneys worth out of them but then when I got them the list price was nowhere near the $700.00 Simms wishes to get now.
I've used them in drift boats too but the felt on the bottoms can make for some serious slipping and sliding.


It's all about having the right tool for the job at hand. Still, in all of the times I used them not once did I get nabbed by the flyfishing fashion police. They were probably inside somewhere thawing out their frozen feets!
The early bird may get the worm,
but the second mouse gets the cheese.

Trout Maharishi


RiverbumCO

Abdomen surgery or just all-around weird belly button there, bud.
My real name is Chad Farthouse.

Woolly Bugger


Quote from: Trout Maharishi on December 02, 2013, 19:10:06 pm
I much prefer hip boots, much more manly ;D


I thought you weren't allowed to wear those in public snymore
ex - I'm not going to live with you through one more fishing season!

me -There's a season?

Pastor explains icons to my son: you know like the fish symbol on the back of cars.

My son: My dad has two fish on his car and they're both trout!

The Dude

Quote from: The Dude on November 25, 2013, 13:49:35 pm
Ultimate Blueliner?


http://www.simmsfishing.com/shop/footwear/vapor-boot.html


I have a review on these boots from a recent fishing trip, if anybody cares.  I took them out of the box, laced them up, put in the studs and the first time I put them on my feet was in the parking lot before a 5 mile hike-in fishing trip.  I have to say they performed admirably.  I was replacing a pair of Rivershed boots that had been the closest thing I could find to a durable boot that could handle a lot of hiking and abuse, as well as trips with the weight of a backpack.  The Riversheds did a great job for me, but were a tad on the heavy side, but I was willing to take on the weight as a tradeoff for the stability when used as a hiking boot.
So, out come the Vapor Boots and I decide to give them a try.  They were several ounces lighter than the Riversheds and they were marketed as removing weight in the sole so as to allow for a softer sole and therefore more a better connection ("feel") between your foot and the stream to aid in wading (they call it prioperception).  The weight was certainly removed, but there was no increase of "feel" transmitted to my feet over the previous rubber sole technology.  You still need felt soles for that.  However, as a hybrid hiker, soft soles would make my feet tired, so I didn't really want that anyway.  In the water (provided I use the studs/cleats), I had no problems and they were no different than the Riversheds (my feet may have been a tad bit colder, but that is hard to say).  On the trail they were much improved with better grip/traction which led to a faster pace.  I could really notice the difference on the ball of my foot when I pushed off before taking the next step.  That is where the old boots (and felt soles, especially) tend to slip and would require more effort than these.  After 10 miles, I got back to the car and my feet had no blisters, hot spots, cramps, sore spots, etc.  That is pretty crazy for a pair of hiking boots right out of the box and never broken in - and unheard of for wading boots.
All in all, I am a fan, but they aren't any different as far as wading goes - all of the benefit is in the trail aspect.  Most boots would only last me one year.  The Riversheds were the first to last 2 years.  I am hoping that the Vapors have the same kind of durability.  If so, then they will be my boot of choice (and they are $10 cheaper), but anything less than two years out of them and I will not be getting them for my next pair.
But, as far as the new Simms boots offering the "Prioperception", it is just a marketing ploy and does not exist in real life.  Still, it isn't any worse than the other rubber sole boots, but they are lighter, FWIW.
I was born by the river in a little tent,
And just like the river I've been running ever since,
It's been a long, long time coming,
But I know change is gonna come.

Dougfish

Good review dude.
And you reminded me that I need to fish my rubber soled boots more.
I picked up a pair of Cabelas boots that were a good deal w/some new waders this spring. It was my first foray into rubber soles. I have the good Orvis studs in them. I bought them for the same use as you. I did not want to hike in felt. I'm still not comfy with the stream grip. But you are the rock hopping stud, and I'm not.  ;D

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